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Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue in pediatric patients.

Fabbri R, Vicenti R, Macciocca M, Pasquinelli G, Lima M, Parazza I, Magnani V, Venturoli S - Obstet Gynecol Int (2012)

Bottom Line: Cancer treatments improve the survival rate of children and adolescents; however chemo- and radiotherapy result in gonadal damage leading to acute ovarian failure and sterility.A strong negative correlation was found between age and follicular density in patients both prior to and after chemotherapy (P < 0.0001).Damage in follicular quality, that is, increased oocyte vacuolization and detachment of the oocyte from granulosa cells, was found after chemotherapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna 40138, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Cancer treatments improve the survival rate of children and adolescents; however chemo- and radiotherapy result in gonadal damage leading to acute ovarian failure and sterility. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation allows long-term storage of primordial follicles and represents the only possibility of preserving the potential fertility in prepubertal girls. The aim of the present study is to describe our experience in ovarian tissue cryopreservation in 45 pediatric patients. The number of follicles per square millimeter of the overall section area and follicle quality were evaluated histologically. A strong negative correlation was found between age and follicular density in patients both prior to and after chemotherapy (P < 0.0001). Damage in follicular quality, that is, increased oocyte vacuolization and detachment of the oocyte from granulosa cells, was found after chemotherapy. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation, preferably performed before initiation of chemotherapy, should be offered to pediatric patients, including prepubertal girls, at risk of sterility.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of follicular densities between premenarcheal and postmenarcheal patients in pre- and post-chemotherapy groups. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.001.
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fig2: Comparison of follicular densities between premenarcheal and postmenarcheal patients in pre- and post-chemotherapy groups. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.001.

Mentions: In agreement with literature [10, 26], we found an age-dependent decline in follicular density in pediatric patients. In the pre-chemotherapy group as well as in the post-chemotherapy group, the follicular density showed a statistically negative correlation dependent on patient age (y = −0.378x + 87.124, R2 = 0.354, P < 0.0001; y = −0.637x + 126.63, R2 = 0.776; P < 0.0001) (Figure 1). Follicular density results were higher in premenarcheal patients than in the postmenarcheal in the pre-chemotherapy group (53.4 ± 10.3 versus 18.2 ± 5.6, P < 0.05; mean ± SE) as well as in the post-chemotherapy group (66.1 ± 22 versus 12.4 ± 2.1, P < 0.001; mean ± SE) (Figure 2).


Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue in pediatric patients.

Fabbri R, Vicenti R, Macciocca M, Pasquinelli G, Lima M, Parazza I, Magnani V, Venturoli S - Obstet Gynecol Int (2012)

Comparison of follicular densities between premenarcheal and postmenarcheal patients in pre- and post-chemotherapy groups. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3306942&req=5

fig2: Comparison of follicular densities between premenarcheal and postmenarcheal patients in pre- and post-chemotherapy groups. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.001.
Mentions: In agreement with literature [10, 26], we found an age-dependent decline in follicular density in pediatric patients. In the pre-chemotherapy group as well as in the post-chemotherapy group, the follicular density showed a statistically negative correlation dependent on patient age (y = −0.378x + 87.124, R2 = 0.354, P < 0.0001; y = −0.637x + 126.63, R2 = 0.776; P < 0.0001) (Figure 1). Follicular density results were higher in premenarcheal patients than in the postmenarcheal in the pre-chemotherapy group (53.4 ± 10.3 versus 18.2 ± 5.6, P < 0.05; mean ± SE) as well as in the post-chemotherapy group (66.1 ± 22 versus 12.4 ± 2.1, P < 0.001; mean ± SE) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Cancer treatments improve the survival rate of children and adolescents; however chemo- and radiotherapy result in gonadal damage leading to acute ovarian failure and sterility.A strong negative correlation was found between age and follicular density in patients both prior to and after chemotherapy (P < 0.0001).Damage in follicular quality, that is, increased oocyte vacuolization and detachment of the oocyte from granulosa cells, was found after chemotherapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna 40138, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Cancer treatments improve the survival rate of children and adolescents; however chemo- and radiotherapy result in gonadal damage leading to acute ovarian failure and sterility. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation allows long-term storage of primordial follicles and represents the only possibility of preserving the potential fertility in prepubertal girls. The aim of the present study is to describe our experience in ovarian tissue cryopreservation in 45 pediatric patients. The number of follicles per square millimeter of the overall section area and follicle quality were evaluated histologically. A strong negative correlation was found between age and follicular density in patients both prior to and after chemotherapy (P < 0.0001). Damage in follicular quality, that is, increased oocyte vacuolization and detachment of the oocyte from granulosa cells, was found after chemotherapy. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation, preferably performed before initiation of chemotherapy, should be offered to pediatric patients, including prepubertal girls, at risk of sterility.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus