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Are verbal fluency and nonliteral language comprehension deficits related to depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease?

Tremblay C, Monchi O, Hudon C, Macoir J, Monetta L - Parkinsons Dis (2012)

Bottom Line: Depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently associated with executive deficits, which can influence nonliteral comprehension and lexical access.For the indirect speech act comprehension task, no difference was observed between the groups.However, the PDDS group had difficulty answering direct speech act questions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Département de Réadaptation, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval, QC, Canada G1V 0A6.

ABSTRACT
Depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently associated with executive deficits, which can influence nonliteral comprehension and lexical access. This study explores whether depressive symptoms in PD modulate verbal fluency and nonliteral language comprehension. Twelve individuals with PD without depressive symptoms, 13 with PD and depressive symptoms (PDDSs), and 13 healthy controls completed a semantic and phonemic verbal fluency task and an indirect speech acts comprehension task. All groups had the same performance in the phonemic fluency task while the PDDS group was impaired in the semantic task. For the indirect speech act comprehension task, no difference was observed between the groups. However, the PDDS group had difficulty answering direct speech act questions. As some language impairments in PD become apparent when depressive symptoms are associated with the disease, it would appear to be important to take the presence of depressive symptoms into account when evaluating language abilities in PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phonemic and semantic verbal fluency mean results (±SEM) for participants with Parkinson's disease with (white column) and without (grey column) depressive symptoms and healthy controls (black column).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Phonemic and semantic verbal fluency mean results (±SEM) for participants with Parkinson's disease with (white column) and without (grey column) depressive symptoms and healthy controls (black column).

Mentions: Figure 1 presents the mean numbers of words produced in the phonemic and semantic verbal fluency tasks for the HC group and both PD groups. The ANOVA revealed a significant difference between the three groups (PD, PDDS, HC) for semantic verbal fluency (F(2,34) = 3.64, P = 0.04). Interestingly, the scores of PDDS in this task were significantly different than those of the HC group (P = 0.03) whilst there was no significant difference in the number of words produced by HC and PD participants (P = 0.28) as indicated by post hoc comparisons using Tukey test. In the phonemic verbal fluency task, there was no significant difference between the HC and the two PD groups (F(2,34) = 98.23, P = 0.15).


Are verbal fluency and nonliteral language comprehension deficits related to depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease?

Tremblay C, Monchi O, Hudon C, Macoir J, Monetta L - Parkinsons Dis (2012)

Phonemic and semantic verbal fluency mean results (±SEM) for participants with Parkinson's disease with (white column) and without (grey column) depressive symptoms and healthy controls (black column).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3306925&req=5

fig1: Phonemic and semantic verbal fluency mean results (±SEM) for participants with Parkinson's disease with (white column) and without (grey column) depressive symptoms and healthy controls (black column).
Mentions: Figure 1 presents the mean numbers of words produced in the phonemic and semantic verbal fluency tasks for the HC group and both PD groups. The ANOVA revealed a significant difference between the three groups (PD, PDDS, HC) for semantic verbal fluency (F(2,34) = 3.64, P = 0.04). Interestingly, the scores of PDDS in this task were significantly different than those of the HC group (P = 0.03) whilst there was no significant difference in the number of words produced by HC and PD participants (P = 0.28) as indicated by post hoc comparisons using Tukey test. In the phonemic verbal fluency task, there was no significant difference between the HC and the two PD groups (F(2,34) = 98.23, P = 0.15).

Bottom Line: Depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently associated with executive deficits, which can influence nonliteral comprehension and lexical access.For the indirect speech act comprehension task, no difference was observed between the groups.However, the PDDS group had difficulty answering direct speech act questions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Département de Réadaptation, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval, QC, Canada G1V 0A6.

ABSTRACT
Depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently associated with executive deficits, which can influence nonliteral comprehension and lexical access. This study explores whether depressive symptoms in PD modulate verbal fluency and nonliteral language comprehension. Twelve individuals with PD without depressive symptoms, 13 with PD and depressive symptoms (PDDSs), and 13 healthy controls completed a semantic and phonemic verbal fluency task and an indirect speech acts comprehension task. All groups had the same performance in the phonemic fluency task while the PDDS group was impaired in the semantic task. For the indirect speech act comprehension task, no difference was observed between the groups. However, the PDDS group had difficulty answering direct speech act questions. As some language impairments in PD become apparent when depressive symptoms are associated with the disease, it would appear to be important to take the presence of depressive symptoms into account when evaluating language abilities in PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus