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Physician Wages in States with Expanded APRN Scope of Practice.

Pittman P, Williams B - Nurs Res Pract (2012)

Bottom Line: We also compared surgeons' earnings as a control group.Lastly, we compared the rate of growth in the earnings of primary care physicians and surgeons over the last ten years.This preliminary analysis revealed no evidence of differences in earnings across the two groups of states.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Policy, School of Public Health and Health Services, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, states have looked to reforms in advanced practice nursing scope of practice (SOP) barriers as a potential means to increase access to primary care while reducing costs. Currently, 16 states and the District of Columbia permit advanced practice registered nurses to practice independently of physicians, allowing them to perform functions such as diagnosing and prescribing under their own authority within the primary care setting. Given the resistance of many physician associations to these reforms, we asked whether the economic interests of primary care physicians might be affected by reforms. Using the Bureau of Labor Statistics data on earnings, we compared primary care physicians' earnings in states that have instituted SOP reforms to those that maintain these practice barriers. We also compared surgeons' earnings as a control group. Lastly, we compared the rate of growth in the earnings of primary care physicians and surgeons over the last ten years. This preliminary analysis revealed no evidence of differences in earnings across the two groups of states.

No MeSH data available.


Family and general physician earnings, 2009 (with national average and standard deviation). Source: [16].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3306917&req=5

fig1: Family and general physician earnings, 2009 (with national average and standard deviation). Source: [16].

Mentions: Figures 1, 2, and 3 present our principle findings, with average earnings and one standard deviation displayed by specialist type for each category of states in 2009. For family and general physicians (Figure 1), average earnings in states without SOP barriers (full SOP) were $79.36 per hour, and earnings in states with restrictive SOP laws were $81.15. For general pediatricians (Figure 2), earnings in full SOP states were $83.94 per hour, and earnings in restrictive SOP states were $78.43 per hour. For surgeons (Figure 3), earnings in full SOP states were $107.23 per hour, and earnings in restrictive SOP states were $103.85. In all three practitioner groups, average earnings in full and restrictive SOP states fell within one standard deviation of one another, confirming that, for each group, the variation in earnings between the two types of states is not statistically significant.


Physician Wages in States with Expanded APRN Scope of Practice.

Pittman P, Williams B - Nurs Res Pract (2012)

Family and general physician earnings, 2009 (with national average and standard deviation). Source: [16].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3306917&req=5

fig1: Family and general physician earnings, 2009 (with national average and standard deviation). Source: [16].
Mentions: Figures 1, 2, and 3 present our principle findings, with average earnings and one standard deviation displayed by specialist type for each category of states in 2009. For family and general physicians (Figure 1), average earnings in states without SOP barriers (full SOP) were $79.36 per hour, and earnings in states with restrictive SOP laws were $81.15. For general pediatricians (Figure 2), earnings in full SOP states were $83.94 per hour, and earnings in restrictive SOP states were $78.43 per hour. For surgeons (Figure 3), earnings in full SOP states were $107.23 per hour, and earnings in restrictive SOP states were $103.85. In all three practitioner groups, average earnings in full and restrictive SOP states fell within one standard deviation of one another, confirming that, for each group, the variation in earnings between the two types of states is not statistically significant.

Bottom Line: We also compared surgeons' earnings as a control group.Lastly, we compared the rate of growth in the earnings of primary care physicians and surgeons over the last ten years.This preliminary analysis revealed no evidence of differences in earnings across the two groups of states.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Policy, School of Public Health and Health Services, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, states have looked to reforms in advanced practice nursing scope of practice (SOP) barriers as a potential means to increase access to primary care while reducing costs. Currently, 16 states and the District of Columbia permit advanced practice registered nurses to practice independently of physicians, allowing them to perform functions such as diagnosing and prescribing under their own authority within the primary care setting. Given the resistance of many physician associations to these reforms, we asked whether the economic interests of primary care physicians might be affected by reforms. Using the Bureau of Labor Statistics data on earnings, we compared primary care physicians' earnings in states that have instituted SOP reforms to those that maintain these practice barriers. We also compared surgeons' earnings as a control group. Lastly, we compared the rate of growth in the earnings of primary care physicians and surgeons over the last ten years. This preliminary analysis revealed no evidence of differences in earnings across the two groups of states.

No MeSH data available.