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Extensive range persistence in peripheral and interior refugia characterizes Pleistocene range dynamics in a widespread Alpine plant species (Senecio carniolicus, Asteraceae).

Escobar García P, Winkler M, Flatscher R, Sonnleitner M, Krejčíková J, Suda J, Hülber K, Schneeweiss GM, Schönswetter P - Mol. Ecol. (2012)

Bottom Line: DNA sequences have been deposited in GenBank under accession nos.FR796701–FR797793 and nos.HE614296–HE614583.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, Vienna, Austria.

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Patterns of plastid DNA variation in diploid Senecio carniolicus. (a) Statistical parsimony network of plastid haplotypes (blue, green and yellow to red colours correspond to haplotype groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively, identified by beast), a circle’s size being proportional to the square-root transformed frequency of the respective haplotype; haplotypes found in other species of the Incani clade are indicated by grey circles (b, S. boissieri; h, S. halleri; i, S. incanus; l, S. leucophyllus; p, S. persoonii) without indication of these haplotypes’ frequencies; unsampled haplotypes are represented by black dots. (b) Geographic distribution of plastid haplotypes; colours as in (a), haplotypes occurring in fewer than four individuals are marked with their number. (c) Within-population plastid haplotype diversity calculated as the mean number of pairwise differences (π), its magnitude being proportional to dot size (invariable populations indicated as white dots). Hatched areas in (b) and (c) as in Fig. 1.
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fig02: Patterns of plastid DNA variation in diploid Senecio carniolicus. (a) Statistical parsimony network of plastid haplotypes (blue, green and yellow to red colours correspond to haplotype groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively, identified by beast), a circle’s size being proportional to the square-root transformed frequency of the respective haplotype; haplotypes found in other species of the Incani clade are indicated by grey circles (b, S. boissieri; h, S. halleri; i, S. incanus; l, S. leucophyllus; p, S. persoonii) without indication of these haplotypes’ frequencies; unsampled haplotypes are represented by black dots. (b) Geographic distribution of plastid haplotypes; colours as in (a), haplotypes occurring in fewer than four individuals are marked with their number. (c) Within-population plastid haplotype diversity calculated as the mean number of pairwise differences (π), its magnitude being proportional to dot size (invariable populations indicated as white dots). Hatched areas in (b) and (c) as in Fig. 1.

Mentions: A statistical parsimony network constituted of 35 plastid DNA haplotypes, and their geographic distribution are presented in Fig. 2a,b. The parsimony network of plastid DNA haplotypes revealed strong reciprocal differentiation among haplotypes pertaining to haplotype groups 1 and 3. The mean number of pairwise differences (π) calculated for sets of haplotypes of haplotype groups 1 and 3 amounted to 5.99 and 1.23, respectively (haplotype group 2 contains a single haplotype). The most frequent haplotype was H35 found in 53% of the investigated individuals throughout the distribution range except for its western third (Fig. 2b). Twelve further haplotypes (H17, H20, H21, H23, H25, H26, H28–H33) differed only in a single mutational step from H35 (together with H35 encompassing 71% of the investigated individuals). Most divergent were H1–H11, which were separated by at least 10 mutational steps from the other haplotypes. These haplotypes were present in 11% of the sampled individuals (Fig. 2b). Most outgroup haplotypes were similar to haplotypes H1–H11, but three haplotypes present in S. incanus and S. halleri were close to haplotypes H14 and H17 of haplotype group 3. No outgroup haplotypes were shared with the ingroup (Fig. 2a).


Extensive range persistence in peripheral and interior refugia characterizes Pleistocene range dynamics in a widespread Alpine plant species (Senecio carniolicus, Asteraceae).

Escobar García P, Winkler M, Flatscher R, Sonnleitner M, Krejčíková J, Suda J, Hülber K, Schneeweiss GM, Schönswetter P - Mol. Ecol. (2012)

Patterns of plastid DNA variation in diploid Senecio carniolicus. (a) Statistical parsimony network of plastid haplotypes (blue, green and yellow to red colours correspond to haplotype groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively, identified by beast), a circle’s size being proportional to the square-root transformed frequency of the respective haplotype; haplotypes found in other species of the Incani clade are indicated by grey circles (b, S. boissieri; h, S. halleri; i, S. incanus; l, S. leucophyllus; p, S. persoonii) without indication of these haplotypes’ frequencies; unsampled haplotypes are represented by black dots. (b) Geographic distribution of plastid haplotypes; colours as in (a), haplotypes occurring in fewer than four individuals are marked with their number. (c) Within-population plastid haplotype diversity calculated as the mean number of pairwise differences (π), its magnitude being proportional to dot size (invariable populations indicated as white dots). Hatched areas in (b) and (c) as in Fig. 1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3306793&req=5

fig02: Patterns of plastid DNA variation in diploid Senecio carniolicus. (a) Statistical parsimony network of plastid haplotypes (blue, green and yellow to red colours correspond to haplotype groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively, identified by beast), a circle’s size being proportional to the square-root transformed frequency of the respective haplotype; haplotypes found in other species of the Incani clade are indicated by grey circles (b, S. boissieri; h, S. halleri; i, S. incanus; l, S. leucophyllus; p, S. persoonii) without indication of these haplotypes’ frequencies; unsampled haplotypes are represented by black dots. (b) Geographic distribution of plastid haplotypes; colours as in (a), haplotypes occurring in fewer than four individuals are marked with their number. (c) Within-population plastid haplotype diversity calculated as the mean number of pairwise differences (π), its magnitude being proportional to dot size (invariable populations indicated as white dots). Hatched areas in (b) and (c) as in Fig. 1.
Mentions: A statistical parsimony network constituted of 35 plastid DNA haplotypes, and their geographic distribution are presented in Fig. 2a,b. The parsimony network of plastid DNA haplotypes revealed strong reciprocal differentiation among haplotypes pertaining to haplotype groups 1 and 3. The mean number of pairwise differences (π) calculated for sets of haplotypes of haplotype groups 1 and 3 amounted to 5.99 and 1.23, respectively (haplotype group 2 contains a single haplotype). The most frequent haplotype was H35 found in 53% of the investigated individuals throughout the distribution range except for its western third (Fig. 2b). Twelve further haplotypes (H17, H20, H21, H23, H25, H26, H28–H33) differed only in a single mutational step from H35 (together with H35 encompassing 71% of the investigated individuals). Most divergent were H1–H11, which were separated by at least 10 mutational steps from the other haplotypes. These haplotypes were present in 11% of the sampled individuals (Fig. 2b). Most outgroup haplotypes were similar to haplotypes H1–H11, but three haplotypes present in S. incanus and S. halleri were close to haplotypes H14 and H17 of haplotype group 3. No outgroup haplotypes were shared with the ingroup (Fig. 2a).

Bottom Line: DNA sequences have been deposited in GenBank under accession nos.FR796701–FR797793 and nos.HE614296–HE614583.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, Vienna, Austria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus