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The associations between body and knee height measurements and knee joint structure in an asymptomatic cohort.

Teichtahl AJ, Wluka AE, Strauss BJ, Wang Y, Berry P, Davies-Tuck M, Cicuttini FM - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2012)

Bottom Line: All anthropometric height measures were associated with increasing compartmental tibial bone area (p ≤ 0.05).Although knee height was associated with tibial cartilage volume (e.g. β = 27 mm³ 95% CI 7- 48; p = 0.009 for the medial compartment), these relationship no longer remained significant when knee height as a percentage of body height was analysed.Knee height as a percentage of body height was associated with a reduced risk of medial tibial cartilage defects (odds ratio 0.6; 95% confidence interval 0.4 - 1.0; p = 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been suggested that knee height is a determinant of knee joint load. Nonetheless, no study has directly examined the relationship between anthropometric measures of height and knee joint structures, such as cartilage.

Methods: 89 asymptomatic community-based adults aged 25-62 with no diagnosed history of knee arthropathy were recruited. Anthropometric data (knee height and body height) were obtained by standard protocol, while tibial cartilage volume and defects, as well as bone area were determined from magnetic resonance imaging. Static knee alignment was measured from the joint radiograph.

Results: All anthropometric height measures were associated with increasing compartmental tibial bone area (p ≤ 0.05). Although knee height was associated with tibial cartilage volume (e.g. β = 27 mm³ 95% CI 7- 48; p = 0.009 for the medial compartment), these relationship no longer remained significant when knee height as a percentage of body height was analysed. Knee height as a percentage of body height was associated with a reduced risk of medial tibial cartilage defects (odds ratio 0.6; 95% confidence interval 0.4 - 1.0; p = 0.05).

Conclusion: The association between increased anthropometric height measures and increased tibial bone area may reflect inherently larger bony structures. However the beneficial associations demonstrated with cartilage morphology suggest that an increased knee height may confer a beneficial biomechanical environment to the chondrocyte of asymptomatic adults.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Knee height measurement, Knee height was defined as the distance from the sole of the foot to the most anterior surface of the femoral condyles of the thigh (medial being more anterior), with the ankle and knee each flexed to a 90° angle.
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Figure 1: Knee height measurement, Knee height was defined as the distance from the sole of the foot to the most anterior surface of the femoral condyles of the thigh (medial being more anterior), with the ankle and knee each flexed to a 90° angle.

Mentions: Knee height was measured by a single trained observer using the standardized procedures as described by Zhang [6]. Knee height was defined as the distance from the sole of the foot to the anterior surface of the femoral condyle of the thigh, with the ankle and knee each flexed to a 90° angle (see Figure 1). It was measured on each of the participants while supine on the examination table using a sliding caliper on the leg that had undergone MRI to the nearest 0.1cm. The coefficient of variation (CV) for the measure of knee height was 3.9%. Knee height as a percentage of totally body height was then calculated by dividing the knee height (cm) by the body height (cm), and multiplying by 100.


The associations between body and knee height measurements and knee joint structure in an asymptomatic cohort.

Teichtahl AJ, Wluka AE, Strauss BJ, Wang Y, Berry P, Davies-Tuck M, Cicuttini FM - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2012)

Knee height measurement, Knee height was defined as the distance from the sole of the foot to the most anterior surface of the femoral condyles of the thigh (medial being more anterior), with the ankle and knee each flexed to a 90° angle.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3306748&req=5

Figure 1: Knee height measurement, Knee height was defined as the distance from the sole of the foot to the most anterior surface of the femoral condyles of the thigh (medial being more anterior), with the ankle and knee each flexed to a 90° angle.
Mentions: Knee height was measured by a single trained observer using the standardized procedures as described by Zhang [6]. Knee height was defined as the distance from the sole of the foot to the anterior surface of the femoral condyle of the thigh, with the ankle and knee each flexed to a 90° angle (see Figure 1). It was measured on each of the participants while supine on the examination table using a sliding caliper on the leg that had undergone MRI to the nearest 0.1cm. The coefficient of variation (CV) for the measure of knee height was 3.9%. Knee height as a percentage of totally body height was then calculated by dividing the knee height (cm) by the body height (cm), and multiplying by 100.

Bottom Line: All anthropometric height measures were associated with increasing compartmental tibial bone area (p ≤ 0.05).Although knee height was associated with tibial cartilage volume (e.g. β = 27 mm³ 95% CI 7- 48; p = 0.009 for the medial compartment), these relationship no longer remained significant when knee height as a percentage of body height was analysed.Knee height as a percentage of body height was associated with a reduced risk of medial tibial cartilage defects (odds ratio 0.6; 95% confidence interval 0.4 - 1.0; p = 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been suggested that knee height is a determinant of knee joint load. Nonetheless, no study has directly examined the relationship between anthropometric measures of height and knee joint structures, such as cartilage.

Methods: 89 asymptomatic community-based adults aged 25-62 with no diagnosed history of knee arthropathy were recruited. Anthropometric data (knee height and body height) were obtained by standard protocol, while tibial cartilage volume and defects, as well as bone area were determined from magnetic resonance imaging. Static knee alignment was measured from the joint radiograph.

Results: All anthropometric height measures were associated with increasing compartmental tibial bone area (p ≤ 0.05). Although knee height was associated with tibial cartilage volume (e.g. β = 27 mm³ 95% CI 7- 48; p = 0.009 for the medial compartment), these relationship no longer remained significant when knee height as a percentage of body height was analysed. Knee height as a percentage of body height was associated with a reduced risk of medial tibial cartilage defects (odds ratio 0.6; 95% confidence interval 0.4 - 1.0; p = 0.05).

Conclusion: The association between increased anthropometric height measures and increased tibial bone area may reflect inherently larger bony structures. However the beneficial associations demonstrated with cartilage morphology suggest that an increased knee height may confer a beneficial biomechanical environment to the chondrocyte of asymptomatic adults.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus