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Tribal casinos in California: the last vestige of indoor smoking.

Timberlake DS, Wu J, Al-Delaimy WK - BMC Public Health (2012)

Bottom Line: Ethnic minorities, older individuals, current smokers and residents of sparsely populated regions of California were more likely than other demographic groups to visit a tribal casino.The never smokers versus current smokers disproportionately expressed a willingness to extend their stay and visit again if smoking were prohibited.If casinos became smoke free, then it is anticipated that they would be visited by a significantly larger number of Californians, including both patrons and those who otherwise would not have visited a casino.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Anteater Instruction & Research Building, Irvine, CA 92697-3957, USA. dtimberl@uci.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: High levels of airborne particles from secondhand smoke have been reported in California Indian casinos. Yet, little is known regarding the smoking status of casino patrons, their avoidance of secondhand smoke while visiting, and their views on a hypothetical smoking ban.

Methods: Predictors of visiting an Indian casino were assessed among participants of the 2008 California Tobacco Survey (n = 10,397). Exposure to and avoidance of secondhand smoke were subsequently analyzed among a subset of participants who had visited a casino in the year prior to the survey (n = 3,361).

Results: Ethnic minorities, older individuals, current smokers and residents of sparsely populated regions of California were more likely than other demographic groups to visit a tribal casino. Avoidance of secondhand smoke was more frequent among the never smokers than former and current smokers, particularly those who last visited a casino lacking physical separation between non-smoking and smoking sections. The never smokers versus current smokers disproportionately expressed a willingness to extend their stay and visit again if smoking were prohibited.

Conclusions: If casinos became smoke free, then it is anticipated that they would be visited by a significantly larger number of Californians, including both patrons and those who otherwise would not have visited a casino.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Avoidance of secondhand smoke by the nearest casino's non-smoking section and probability (quartile) of visiting a casino with an enclosed non-smoking section.
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Figure 3: Avoidance of secondhand smoke by the nearest casino's non-smoking section and probability (quartile) of visiting a casino with an enclosed non-smoking section.

Mentions: Among the 58 California casinos, 21 were identified as being closest in proximity in miles to the centroids of zip codes where past-year patrons resided; the median distance was 36.1 miles. Three of the 59 centroids had only a single casino within a 100 mile distance, whereas, five centroids had 19 casinos within a 100 mile distance. As illustrated in Figure 3, a negative association, although not statistically significant (χ(3 d.f.)2 = 5.8, p = .12), was observed between never-smokers' avoidance of secondhand smoke and their nearest casinos' type of non-smoking section. This trend was apparent neither for the former nor current smokers.


Tribal casinos in California: the last vestige of indoor smoking.

Timberlake DS, Wu J, Al-Delaimy WK - BMC Public Health (2012)

Avoidance of secondhand smoke by the nearest casino's non-smoking section and probability (quartile) of visiting a casino with an enclosed non-smoking section.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3306736&req=5

Figure 3: Avoidance of secondhand smoke by the nearest casino's non-smoking section and probability (quartile) of visiting a casino with an enclosed non-smoking section.
Mentions: Among the 58 California casinos, 21 were identified as being closest in proximity in miles to the centroids of zip codes where past-year patrons resided; the median distance was 36.1 miles. Three of the 59 centroids had only a single casino within a 100 mile distance, whereas, five centroids had 19 casinos within a 100 mile distance. As illustrated in Figure 3, a negative association, although not statistically significant (χ(3 d.f.)2 = 5.8, p = .12), was observed between never-smokers' avoidance of secondhand smoke and their nearest casinos' type of non-smoking section. This trend was apparent neither for the former nor current smokers.

Bottom Line: Ethnic minorities, older individuals, current smokers and residents of sparsely populated regions of California were more likely than other demographic groups to visit a tribal casino.The never smokers versus current smokers disproportionately expressed a willingness to extend their stay and visit again if smoking were prohibited.If casinos became smoke free, then it is anticipated that they would be visited by a significantly larger number of Californians, including both patrons and those who otherwise would not have visited a casino.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Anteater Instruction & Research Building, Irvine, CA 92697-3957, USA. dtimberl@uci.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: High levels of airborne particles from secondhand smoke have been reported in California Indian casinos. Yet, little is known regarding the smoking status of casino patrons, their avoidance of secondhand smoke while visiting, and their views on a hypothetical smoking ban.

Methods: Predictors of visiting an Indian casino were assessed among participants of the 2008 California Tobacco Survey (n = 10,397). Exposure to and avoidance of secondhand smoke were subsequently analyzed among a subset of participants who had visited a casino in the year prior to the survey (n = 3,361).

Results: Ethnic minorities, older individuals, current smokers and residents of sparsely populated regions of California were more likely than other demographic groups to visit a tribal casino. Avoidance of secondhand smoke was more frequent among the never smokers than former and current smokers, particularly those who last visited a casino lacking physical separation between non-smoking and smoking sections. The never smokers versus current smokers disproportionately expressed a willingness to extend their stay and visit again if smoking were prohibited.

Conclusions: If casinos became smoke free, then it is anticipated that they would be visited by a significantly larger number of Californians, including both patrons and those who otherwise would not have visited a casino.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus