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Handling cervical myomas.

Patel P, Banker M, Munshi S, Bhalla A - J Gynecol Endosc Surg (2011)

Bottom Line: Compared to myomas that occur in the uterine corpus, cervical myomas are closer to other organs such as the bladder, ureter, and rectum, and the approach needs to be modified, as the organs that have to be considered differ depending on the location of the myoma.Surgical difficulties associated with these cases are, poor access to the operative field, difficulty in suturing the repairs, increased blood loss, and distortion of the anatomy of the vital neighboring structures in the pelvic cavity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pulse Women's Hospital, Ahmedabad, India.

ABSTRACT
Compared to myomas that occur in the uterine corpus, cervical myomas are closer to other organs such as the bladder, ureter, and rectum, and the approach needs to be modified, as the organs that have to be considered differ depending on the location of the myoma. Surgical difficulties associated with these cases are, poor access to the operative field, difficulty in suturing the repairs, increased blood loss, and distortion of the anatomy of the vital neighboring structures in the pelvic cavity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Saturing of resultant defect
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Figure 2: Saturing of resultant defect

Mentions: The most difficult part of cervical myomectomy is suturing the base of the wound following enucleation. Complete dissection of the surrounding organs such as the bladder and ureter, near the base of the wound, is difficult. Bleeding makes it difficult to maintain the visual field, thereby increasing the possibility of damage during suturing. A bottom-up procedure makes it possible to perform suturing safely by providing a complete visual field [Figure 2].


Handling cervical myomas.

Patel P, Banker M, Munshi S, Bhalla A - J Gynecol Endosc Surg (2011)

Saturing of resultant defect
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3304290&req=5

Figure 2: Saturing of resultant defect
Mentions: The most difficult part of cervical myomectomy is suturing the base of the wound following enucleation. Complete dissection of the surrounding organs such as the bladder and ureter, near the base of the wound, is difficult. Bleeding makes it difficult to maintain the visual field, thereby increasing the possibility of damage during suturing. A bottom-up procedure makes it possible to perform suturing safely by providing a complete visual field [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: Compared to myomas that occur in the uterine corpus, cervical myomas are closer to other organs such as the bladder, ureter, and rectum, and the approach needs to be modified, as the organs that have to be considered differ depending on the location of the myoma.Surgical difficulties associated with these cases are, poor access to the operative field, difficulty in suturing the repairs, increased blood loss, and distortion of the anatomy of the vital neighboring structures in the pelvic cavity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pulse Women's Hospital, Ahmedabad, India.

ABSTRACT
Compared to myomas that occur in the uterine corpus, cervical myomas are closer to other organs such as the bladder, ureter, and rectum, and the approach needs to be modified, as the organs that have to be considered differ depending on the location of the myoma. Surgical difficulties associated with these cases are, poor access to the operative field, difficulty in suturing the repairs, increased blood loss, and distortion of the anatomy of the vital neighboring structures in the pelvic cavity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus