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Acid-base disorders in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pathophysiological review.

Bruno CM, Valenti M - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Bottom Line: The authors describe the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to development of acidosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its deleterious effects on outcome and mortality rate.Renal compensatory adjustments consequent to acidosis are also described in detail with emphasis on differences between acute and chronic respiratory acidosis.Mixed acid-base disturbances due to comorbidity and side effects of some drugs in these patients are also examined, and practical considerations for a correct diagnosis are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine and Systemic Diseases, University of Catania, 95100 Catania, Italy. cmbruno@unict.it

ABSTRACT
The authors describe the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to development of acidosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its deleterious effects on outcome and mortality rate. Renal compensatory adjustments consequent to acidosis are also described in detail with emphasis on differences between acute and chronic respiratory acidosis. Mixed acid-base disturbances due to comorbidity and side effects of some drugs in these patients are also examined, and practical considerations for a correct diagnosis are provided.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Titration of nonvolatile acids. H+ secreted into the tubular fluid combines with phosphate (urinary buffer), and a new −HCO3 is generated within the cell.
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fig3: Titration of nonvolatile acids. H+ secreted into the tubular fluid combines with phosphate (urinary buffer), and a new −HCO3 is generated within the cell.

Mentions: H+ derived from the breakdown of carbonic acid are excreted into the tubular lumen where they are buffered by phosphates (2−HPO4 + H+  ⇒  −H2PO4), while −HCO3 crosses the basolateral membrane via an anion exchange (AE) Cl−/−HCO3 antiporter (Figure 3).


Acid-base disorders in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pathophysiological review.

Bruno CM, Valenti M - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Titration of nonvolatile acids. H+ secreted into the tubular fluid combines with phosphate (urinary buffer), and a new −HCO3 is generated within the cell.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303884&req=5

fig3: Titration of nonvolatile acids. H+ secreted into the tubular fluid combines with phosphate (urinary buffer), and a new −HCO3 is generated within the cell.
Mentions: H+ derived from the breakdown of carbonic acid are excreted into the tubular lumen where they are buffered by phosphates (2−HPO4 + H+  ⇒  −H2PO4), while −HCO3 crosses the basolateral membrane via an anion exchange (AE) Cl−/−HCO3 antiporter (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: The authors describe the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to development of acidosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its deleterious effects on outcome and mortality rate.Renal compensatory adjustments consequent to acidosis are also described in detail with emphasis on differences between acute and chronic respiratory acidosis.Mixed acid-base disturbances due to comorbidity and side effects of some drugs in these patients are also examined, and practical considerations for a correct diagnosis are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine and Systemic Diseases, University of Catania, 95100 Catania, Italy. cmbruno@unict.it

ABSTRACT
The authors describe the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to development of acidosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its deleterious effects on outcome and mortality rate. Renal compensatory adjustments consequent to acidosis are also described in detail with emphasis on differences between acute and chronic respiratory acidosis. Mixed acid-base disturbances due to comorbidity and side effects of some drugs in these patients are also examined, and practical considerations for a correct diagnosis are provided.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus