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Visual-gustatory interaction: orbitofrontal and insular cortices mediate the effect of high-calorie visual food cues on taste pleasantness.

Ohla K, Toepel U, le Coutre J, Hudry J - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: A similar pattern evolved in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) around 180 ms, as well as, in the right insula, around 360 ms.Later activation differences in the right insula likely indicate revaluation of interoceptive taste awareness.Our findings reveal previously unknown mechanisms of cross-modal, visual-gustatory, sensory interactions underlying food evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Perception Physiology, Nestlé Research Center, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, Lausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Vision provides a primary sensory input for food perception. It raises expectations on taste and nutritional value and drives acceptance or rejection. So far, the impact of visual food cues varying in energy content on subsequent taste integration remains unexplored. Using electrical neuroimaging, we assessed whether high- and low-calorie food cues differentially influence the brain processing and perception of a subsequent neutral electric taste. When viewing high-calorie food images, participants reported the subsequent taste to be more pleasant than when low-calorie food images preceded the identical taste. Moreover, the taste-evoked neural activity was stronger in the bilateral insula and the adjacent frontal operculum (FOP) within 100 ms after taste onset when preceded by high- versus low-calorie cues. A similar pattern evolved in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) around 180 ms, as well as, in the right insula, around 360 ms. The activation differences in the OFC correlated positively with changes in taste pleasantness, a finding that is an accord with the role of the OFC in the hedonic evaluation of taste. Later activation differences in the right insula likely indicate revaluation of interoceptive taste awareness. Our findings reveal previously unknown mechanisms of cross-modal, visual-gustatory, sensory interactions underlying food evaluation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlations between changes in source strength and taste pleasantness ratings.Correlations were determined between changes in brain activation (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie) in the OFC and right anterior insula and changes in participant's taste ratings (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie). The source strength was determined at the voxel exhibiting the maximum activity within the region of interest for each participant during the 176–236 ms period for the OFC and during the 357–500 ms period for the right insula.
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pone-0032434-g004: Correlations between changes in source strength and taste pleasantness ratings.Correlations were determined between changes in brain activation (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie) in the OFC and right anterior insula and changes in participant's taste ratings (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie). The source strength was determined at the voxel exhibiting the maximum activity within the region of interest for each participant during the 176–236 ms period for the OFC and during the 357–500 ms period for the right insula.

Mentions: Associations between activation differences to taste preceded by high- vs. low-calorie food cues in regions of interest (insula/FOP and medial OFC) and respective alterations in taste pleasantness ratings were determined over the 92–174 ms (bilateral insula/FOP), the 176–236 ms (medial OFC), and the 357–500 ms (right insula/FOP) time intervals. Initial food cue-induced activation differences in the right and left insula (92–174 ms) were not significantly correlated with the differences in taste pleasantness. However, the activation differences observed in the medial OFC over the successive time period from 176–236 ms correlated positively with changes in taste pleasantness (Figure 4; r = 0.52, p = 0.05). The activation maxima converged across participants at the Talairach coordinates x = +/−3, y = 33, z = −12. Moreover, over the 357–500 ms interval, the source strength differences derived from individuals' activation maxima within the right insula/FOP correlated negatively with changes in taste pleasantness (r = −0.55, p = 0.04).


Visual-gustatory interaction: orbitofrontal and insular cortices mediate the effect of high-calorie visual food cues on taste pleasantness.

Ohla K, Toepel U, le Coutre J, Hudry J - PLoS ONE (2012)

Correlations between changes in source strength and taste pleasantness ratings.Correlations were determined between changes in brain activation (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie) in the OFC and right anterior insula and changes in participant's taste ratings (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie). The source strength was determined at the voxel exhibiting the maximum activity within the region of interest for each participant during the 176–236 ms period for the OFC and during the 357–500 ms period for the right insula.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303800&req=5

pone-0032434-g004: Correlations between changes in source strength and taste pleasantness ratings.Correlations were determined between changes in brain activation (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie) in the OFC and right anterior insula and changes in participant's taste ratings (i.e. high-calorie minus low-calorie). The source strength was determined at the voxel exhibiting the maximum activity within the region of interest for each participant during the 176–236 ms period for the OFC and during the 357–500 ms period for the right insula.
Mentions: Associations between activation differences to taste preceded by high- vs. low-calorie food cues in regions of interest (insula/FOP and medial OFC) and respective alterations in taste pleasantness ratings were determined over the 92–174 ms (bilateral insula/FOP), the 176–236 ms (medial OFC), and the 357–500 ms (right insula/FOP) time intervals. Initial food cue-induced activation differences in the right and left insula (92–174 ms) were not significantly correlated with the differences in taste pleasantness. However, the activation differences observed in the medial OFC over the successive time period from 176–236 ms correlated positively with changes in taste pleasantness (Figure 4; r = 0.52, p = 0.05). The activation maxima converged across participants at the Talairach coordinates x = +/−3, y = 33, z = −12. Moreover, over the 357–500 ms interval, the source strength differences derived from individuals' activation maxima within the right insula/FOP correlated negatively with changes in taste pleasantness (r = −0.55, p = 0.04).

Bottom Line: A similar pattern evolved in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) around 180 ms, as well as, in the right insula, around 360 ms.Later activation differences in the right insula likely indicate revaluation of interoceptive taste awareness.Our findings reveal previously unknown mechanisms of cross-modal, visual-gustatory, sensory interactions underlying food evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Perception Physiology, Nestlé Research Center, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, Lausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Vision provides a primary sensory input for food perception. It raises expectations on taste and nutritional value and drives acceptance or rejection. So far, the impact of visual food cues varying in energy content on subsequent taste integration remains unexplored. Using electrical neuroimaging, we assessed whether high- and low-calorie food cues differentially influence the brain processing and perception of a subsequent neutral electric taste. When viewing high-calorie food images, participants reported the subsequent taste to be more pleasant than when low-calorie food images preceded the identical taste. Moreover, the taste-evoked neural activity was stronger in the bilateral insula and the adjacent frontal operculum (FOP) within 100 ms after taste onset when preceded by high- versus low-calorie cues. A similar pattern evolved in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) around 180 ms, as well as, in the right insula, around 360 ms. The activation differences in the OFC correlated positively with changes in taste pleasantness, a finding that is an accord with the role of the OFC in the hedonic evaluation of taste. Later activation differences in the right insula likely indicate revaluation of interoceptive taste awareness. Our findings reveal previously unknown mechanisms of cross-modal, visual-gustatory, sensory interactions underlying food evaluation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus