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The effect of antihypertensive drugs on endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation in hypertensive patients.

Miyamoto M, Kotani K, Ishibashi S, Taniguchi N - Int J Vasc Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Endothelial dysfunction is found in hypertensive patients and may serve as a prognostic marker of future cardiovascular events.Endothelial function can be assessed noninvasively by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Antihypertensive treatment can improve endothelial dysfunction when assessed by FMD, although there are conflicting data that require further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke-City, Tochigi 329-0498, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Endothelial dysfunction is found in hypertensive patients and may serve as a prognostic marker of future cardiovascular events. Endothelial function can be assessed noninvasively by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). The goal of this paper is to summarize comprehensively the clinical trials that investigated the effects of antihypertensive drugs on endothelial function assessed by FMD in hypertensive patients. A PubMed-based search found 38 clinical trial papers published from January 1999 to June 2011. Significant improvement of FMD after antihypertensive treatment was shown in 43 of 71 interventions (among 38 clinical trial papers). Angiotensin II receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors appeared to improve FMD more than other drug types. Antihypertensive treatment can improve endothelial dysfunction when assessed by FMD, although there are conflicting data that require further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Columns indicate the number of clinical trials that showed the presence or the absence of significant improvement of flow-mediated vasodilation from baseline due to the intervention. FMD: flow-mediated vasodilation; ARBs: Angiotensin II receptor blockers; ACEIs: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; CCBs: Calcium channel blockers.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Columns indicate the number of clinical trials that showed the presence or the absence of significant improvement of flow-mediated vasodilation from baseline due to the intervention. FMD: flow-mediated vasodilation; ARBs: Angiotensin II receptor blockers; ACEIs: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; CCBs: Calcium channel blockers.

Mentions: Given the overall data, antihypertensive treatment can improve endothelial dysfunction when assessed by FMD. The results of clinical trials showing the effects of different drug types on change in FMD are summarized in Figure 1. More interventions that showed significant improvement of FMD appeared to be found in patients treated with ARBs and ACEIs than those treated with other drug types. However, this is not conclusive, because there has been no single RCT that compared the effects of all drug types on FMD.


The effect of antihypertensive drugs on endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation in hypertensive patients.

Miyamoto M, Kotani K, Ishibashi S, Taniguchi N - Int J Vasc Med (2012)

Columns indicate the number of clinical trials that showed the presence or the absence of significant improvement of flow-mediated vasodilation from baseline due to the intervention. FMD: flow-mediated vasodilation; ARBs: Angiotensin II receptor blockers; ACEIs: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; CCBs: Calcium channel blockers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303797&req=5

fig1: Columns indicate the number of clinical trials that showed the presence or the absence of significant improvement of flow-mediated vasodilation from baseline due to the intervention. FMD: flow-mediated vasodilation; ARBs: Angiotensin II receptor blockers; ACEIs: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; CCBs: Calcium channel blockers.
Mentions: Given the overall data, antihypertensive treatment can improve endothelial dysfunction when assessed by FMD. The results of clinical trials showing the effects of different drug types on change in FMD are summarized in Figure 1. More interventions that showed significant improvement of FMD appeared to be found in patients treated with ARBs and ACEIs than those treated with other drug types. However, this is not conclusive, because there has been no single RCT that compared the effects of all drug types on FMD.

Bottom Line: Endothelial dysfunction is found in hypertensive patients and may serve as a prognostic marker of future cardiovascular events.Endothelial function can be assessed noninvasively by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Antihypertensive treatment can improve endothelial dysfunction when assessed by FMD, although there are conflicting data that require further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke-City, Tochigi 329-0498, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Endothelial dysfunction is found in hypertensive patients and may serve as a prognostic marker of future cardiovascular events. Endothelial function can be assessed noninvasively by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). The goal of this paper is to summarize comprehensively the clinical trials that investigated the effects of antihypertensive drugs on endothelial function assessed by FMD in hypertensive patients. A PubMed-based search found 38 clinical trial papers published from January 1999 to June 2011. Significant improvement of FMD after antihypertensive treatment was shown in 43 of 71 interventions (among 38 clinical trial papers). Angiotensin II receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors appeared to improve FMD more than other drug types. Antihypertensive treatment can improve endothelial dysfunction when assessed by FMD, although there are conflicting data that require further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus