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Training programmes can change behaviour and encourage the cultivation of over-harvested plant species.

Williams SJ, Jones JP, Clubbe C, Gibbons JM - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Cultivation of wild-harvested plant species has been proposed as a way of reducing over-exploitation of wild populations but lack of technical knowledge is thought to be a barrier preventing people from cultivating a new species.We suggest that training programmes can have a long lasting effect on individuals and can change behaviour.However, in many situations other barriers to cultivation, such as access to seeds or appropriate markets, will need to be addressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University, Gwynedd, United Kingdom. S.Williams@kew.org

ABSTRACT
Cultivation of wild-harvested plant species has been proposed as a way of reducing over-exploitation of wild populations but lack of technical knowledge is thought to be a barrier preventing people from cultivating a new species. Training programmes are therefore used to increase technical knowledge to encourage people to adopt cultivation. We assessed the impact of a training programme aiming to encourage cultivation of xaté (Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti), an over-harvested palm from Central America. Five years after the training programme ended, we surveyed untrained and trained individuals focusing on four potential predictors of behaviour: technical knowledge, attitudes (what individuals think about a behaviour), subjective norms (what individuals perceive others to think of a behaviour) and perceived behavioural control (self assessment of whether individuals can enact the behaviour successfully). Whilst accounting for socioeconomic variables, we investigate the influence of training upon these behavioural predictors and examine the factors that determine whether people adopt cultivation of a novel species. Those who had been trained had higher levels of technical knowledge about xaté cultivation and higher belief in their ability to cultivate it while training was not associated with differences in attitudes or subjective norms. Technical knowledge and perceived behavioural control (along with socio-economic variables such as forest ownership and age) were predictors of whether individuals cultivate xaté. We suggest that training programmes can have a long lasting effect on individuals and can change behaviour. However, in many situations other barriers to cultivation, such as access to seeds or appropriate markets, will need to be addressed.

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The location of study villages in Belize.
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pone-0033012-g002: The location of study villages in Belize.

Mentions: Belize is a small country on the Caribbean coast of Central America with a population of approximately 300,000 [29]. This work was carried out in the district of Cayo from December 2010 to February 2011 (figure 2). Small scale farming is the main occupation for the majority of the villagers and the inhabitants primarily speak Yucatec Mayan, but most people are also fluent in English and Spanish [29]. As part of a Darwin Initiative Project (UK government funding), Belize Botanic Garden prepared a xaté cultivation training programme which was delivered to 50 farmers from four villages in 2005 and provided participants with xaté seedlings to encourage cultivation. The botanic garden also planted a demonstration plot to promote xaté cultivation. Our study was carried out in these four villages (not named to preserve respondents' anonymity). The training programme aimed to teach people in Belize how to cultivate the xaté, as a method of increasing the supply from cultivated sources and improving local farmers' livelihoods. Creating a xaté market is a relatively new initiative in Belize, whereas Guatemala has a long established system and infrastructure for sorting, packing and exporting xaté leaf [28]. Wild harvesting of xaté is uncommon among Belizeans, and it is suggested that wild harvesting in Belize is carried out illegally by Guatemalans crossing the border [28].


Training programmes can change behaviour and encourage the cultivation of over-harvested plant species.

Williams SJ, Jones JP, Clubbe C, Gibbons JM - PLoS ONE (2012)

The location of study villages in Belize.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303790&req=5

pone-0033012-g002: The location of study villages in Belize.
Mentions: Belize is a small country on the Caribbean coast of Central America with a population of approximately 300,000 [29]. This work was carried out in the district of Cayo from December 2010 to February 2011 (figure 2). Small scale farming is the main occupation for the majority of the villagers and the inhabitants primarily speak Yucatec Mayan, but most people are also fluent in English and Spanish [29]. As part of a Darwin Initiative Project (UK government funding), Belize Botanic Garden prepared a xaté cultivation training programme which was delivered to 50 farmers from four villages in 2005 and provided participants with xaté seedlings to encourage cultivation. The botanic garden also planted a demonstration plot to promote xaté cultivation. Our study was carried out in these four villages (not named to preserve respondents' anonymity). The training programme aimed to teach people in Belize how to cultivate the xaté, as a method of increasing the supply from cultivated sources and improving local farmers' livelihoods. Creating a xaté market is a relatively new initiative in Belize, whereas Guatemala has a long established system and infrastructure for sorting, packing and exporting xaté leaf [28]. Wild harvesting of xaté is uncommon among Belizeans, and it is suggested that wild harvesting in Belize is carried out illegally by Guatemalans crossing the border [28].

Bottom Line: Cultivation of wild-harvested plant species has been proposed as a way of reducing over-exploitation of wild populations but lack of technical knowledge is thought to be a barrier preventing people from cultivating a new species.We suggest that training programmes can have a long lasting effect on individuals and can change behaviour.However, in many situations other barriers to cultivation, such as access to seeds or appropriate markets, will need to be addressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University, Gwynedd, United Kingdom. S.Williams@kew.org

ABSTRACT
Cultivation of wild-harvested plant species has been proposed as a way of reducing over-exploitation of wild populations but lack of technical knowledge is thought to be a barrier preventing people from cultivating a new species. Training programmes are therefore used to increase technical knowledge to encourage people to adopt cultivation. We assessed the impact of a training programme aiming to encourage cultivation of xaté (Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti), an over-harvested palm from Central America. Five years after the training programme ended, we surveyed untrained and trained individuals focusing on four potential predictors of behaviour: technical knowledge, attitudes (what individuals think about a behaviour), subjective norms (what individuals perceive others to think of a behaviour) and perceived behavioural control (self assessment of whether individuals can enact the behaviour successfully). Whilst accounting for socioeconomic variables, we investigate the influence of training upon these behavioural predictors and examine the factors that determine whether people adopt cultivation of a novel species. Those who had been trained had higher levels of technical knowledge about xaté cultivation and higher belief in their ability to cultivate it while training was not associated with differences in attitudes or subjective norms. Technical knowledge and perceived behavioural control (along with socio-economic variables such as forest ownership and age) were predictors of whether individuals cultivate xaté. We suggest that training programmes can have a long lasting effect on individuals and can change behaviour. However, in many situations other barriers to cultivation, such as access to seeds or appropriate markets, will need to be addressed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus