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Isolated cardiac metastasis from colorectal cancer in a 35-year-old man.

Pizzicannella J, Ricci V, Gorla R, Spinapolice E, Esposito A - Case Rep Med (2012)

Bottom Line: We present the case of a 35-year-old patient who was found to be affected by an isolated clinically silent cardiac metastasis despite a negative CT follow-up at one year from abdominal surgery for colorectal cancer.CT/PET and tumor marker GICA were fundamental in suggesting the diagnosis, which was then confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance and surgical biopsy.This is a very rare modality of presentation of cardiac metastasis because of the young age of our patient and the absence of disease in other sites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardio-Thoracic and Vascular Department, San Raffaele Hospital, 20132 Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We present the case of a 35-year-old patient who was found to be affected by an isolated clinically silent cardiac metastasis despite a negative CT follow-up at one year from abdominal surgery for colorectal cancer. CT/PET and tumor marker GICA were fundamental in suggesting the diagnosis, which was then confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance and surgical biopsy. This is a very rare modality of presentation of cardiac metastasis because of the young age of our patient and the absence of disease in other sites.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose showed an intense tracer uptake localized at the right cardiofrenic angle, as shown in transaxial and sagittal views ((b) and (a), resp.).
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fig1: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose showed an intense tracer uptake localized at the right cardiofrenic angle, as shown in transaxial and sagittal views ((b) and (a), resp.).

Mentions: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), performed for restaging purpose, revealed the presence of a right angle cardiophrenic marked uptake (Figure 1). A cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) study was performed to characterize this finding. CMR confirmed the presence of a solid mass (50 × 64 × 26 mm) inside the visceral paper of the pericardium and infiltrating the basal wall of the right ventricle (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)); this mass was characterized by a moderate hyperintensity on T2w images (Figure 2(c)) and by a progressive ring enhancement (Figure 2(d)) and was interpreted as a probable secondary malignant lesion. So the patient underwent cardiac surgery in order to obtain a histologic diagnosis of the ventricular mass and for debulking purpose. Surgical biopsy confirmed the secondary nature of the cardiac lesion histologically corresponding to a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, reported to be colorectal secondary malignancy, invading the sierosa with lymphovascular and perineural invasion. Unfortunately, debulking surgery could not be performed without sacrificing the tricuspid valve, since the metastasis deeply infiltrated it. Atrioventricular sulcus was affected by disease, as well.


Isolated cardiac metastasis from colorectal cancer in a 35-year-old man.

Pizzicannella J, Ricci V, Gorla R, Spinapolice E, Esposito A - Case Rep Med (2012)

Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose showed an intense tracer uptake localized at the right cardiofrenic angle, as shown in transaxial and sagittal views ((b) and (a), resp.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303752&req=5

fig1: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose showed an intense tracer uptake localized at the right cardiofrenic angle, as shown in transaxial and sagittal views ((b) and (a), resp.).
Mentions: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), performed for restaging purpose, revealed the presence of a right angle cardiophrenic marked uptake (Figure 1). A cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) study was performed to characterize this finding. CMR confirmed the presence of a solid mass (50 × 64 × 26 mm) inside the visceral paper of the pericardium and infiltrating the basal wall of the right ventricle (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)); this mass was characterized by a moderate hyperintensity on T2w images (Figure 2(c)) and by a progressive ring enhancement (Figure 2(d)) and was interpreted as a probable secondary malignant lesion. So the patient underwent cardiac surgery in order to obtain a histologic diagnosis of the ventricular mass and for debulking purpose. Surgical biopsy confirmed the secondary nature of the cardiac lesion histologically corresponding to a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, reported to be colorectal secondary malignancy, invading the sierosa with lymphovascular and perineural invasion. Unfortunately, debulking surgery could not be performed without sacrificing the tricuspid valve, since the metastasis deeply infiltrated it. Atrioventricular sulcus was affected by disease, as well.

Bottom Line: We present the case of a 35-year-old patient who was found to be affected by an isolated clinically silent cardiac metastasis despite a negative CT follow-up at one year from abdominal surgery for colorectal cancer.CT/PET and tumor marker GICA were fundamental in suggesting the diagnosis, which was then confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance and surgical biopsy.This is a very rare modality of presentation of cardiac metastasis because of the young age of our patient and the absence of disease in other sites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardio-Thoracic and Vascular Department, San Raffaele Hospital, 20132 Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We present the case of a 35-year-old patient who was found to be affected by an isolated clinically silent cardiac metastasis despite a negative CT follow-up at one year from abdominal surgery for colorectal cancer. CT/PET and tumor marker GICA were fundamental in suggesting the diagnosis, which was then confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance and surgical biopsy. This is a very rare modality of presentation of cardiac metastasis because of the young age of our patient and the absence of disease in other sites.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus