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Effects of high-speed power training on muscle performance and braking speed in older adults.

Sayers SP, Gibson K - J Aging Res (2012)

Bottom Line: HSPT increased peak power and peak power velocity across a range of external resistances (40-90% 1RM; P < 0.05) and improved braking speed (P < 0.05).Work was similar between groups, but perceived exertion was lower in HSPT (P < 0.05).Thus, the less strenuous HSPT exerted a broader training effect and improved braking speed compared to SSST.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA.

ABSTRACT
We examined whether high-speed power training (HSPT) improved muscle performance and braking speed using a driving simulator. 72 older adults (22 m, 50 f; age = 70.6 ± 7.3 yrs) were randomized to HSPT at 40% one-repetition maximum (1RM) (HSPT: n = 25; 3 sets of 12-14 repetitions), slow-speed strength training at 80%1RM (SSST: n = 25; 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions), or control (CON: n = 22; stretching) 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Leg press and knee extension peak power, peak power velocity, peak power force/torque, and braking speed were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks. HSPT increased peak power and peak power velocity across a range of external resistances (40-90% 1RM; P < 0.05) and improved braking speed (P < 0.05). Work was similar between groups, but perceived exertion was lower in HSPT (P < 0.05). Thus, the less strenuous HSPT exerted a broader training effect and improved braking speed compared to SSST.

No MeSH data available.


Baseline to posttraining changes in leg press peak power relative to baseline one-repetition maximum (1RM) across a range of external resistances. HSPT = high-speed power training; SSST = slow-speed strength training; CON = control. *HSPT > CON; †SSST > CON.
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fig3: Baseline to posttraining changes in leg press peak power relative to baseline one-repetition maximum (1RM) across a range of external resistances. HSPT = high-speed power training; SSST = slow-speed strength training; CON = control. *HSPT > CON; †SSST > CON.

Mentions: The changes in leg press peak power, leg press peak power velocity, and leg press peak power force values at each condition (40–90% 1RM) (see Table 2) were compared using a univariate ANOVA. There was a significant group main effects for leg press peak power and peak power velocity at each condition (all P ≤ 0.007). Post hoc tests showed that for both measures (peak power and peak power velocity) HSPT was greater than CON across all external resistances (40–90% 1RM; all P ≤ 0.02), while SSST was only greater than CON from 70–90% 1RM (all P ≤ 0.04) (See Figures 3 and 4). There was no significant group main effect for leg press peak power force at any condition (all P ≥ 0.10). These findings indicate that HSPT exerted a broader training effect than SSST when comparing the change in baseline power and speed across a range of typically encountered external resistances.


Effects of high-speed power training on muscle performance and braking speed in older adults.

Sayers SP, Gibson K - J Aging Res (2012)

Baseline to posttraining changes in leg press peak power relative to baseline one-repetition maximum (1RM) across a range of external resistances. HSPT = high-speed power training; SSST = slow-speed strength training; CON = control. *HSPT > CON; †SSST > CON.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303692&req=5

fig3: Baseline to posttraining changes in leg press peak power relative to baseline one-repetition maximum (1RM) across a range of external resistances. HSPT = high-speed power training; SSST = slow-speed strength training; CON = control. *HSPT > CON; †SSST > CON.
Mentions: The changes in leg press peak power, leg press peak power velocity, and leg press peak power force values at each condition (40–90% 1RM) (see Table 2) were compared using a univariate ANOVA. There was a significant group main effects for leg press peak power and peak power velocity at each condition (all P ≤ 0.007). Post hoc tests showed that for both measures (peak power and peak power velocity) HSPT was greater than CON across all external resistances (40–90% 1RM; all P ≤ 0.02), while SSST was only greater than CON from 70–90% 1RM (all P ≤ 0.04) (See Figures 3 and 4). There was no significant group main effect for leg press peak power force at any condition (all P ≥ 0.10). These findings indicate that HSPT exerted a broader training effect than SSST when comparing the change in baseline power and speed across a range of typically encountered external resistances.

Bottom Line: HSPT increased peak power and peak power velocity across a range of external resistances (40-90% 1RM; P < 0.05) and improved braking speed (P < 0.05).Work was similar between groups, but perceived exertion was lower in HSPT (P < 0.05).Thus, the less strenuous HSPT exerted a broader training effect and improved braking speed compared to SSST.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA.

ABSTRACT
We examined whether high-speed power training (HSPT) improved muscle performance and braking speed using a driving simulator. 72 older adults (22 m, 50 f; age = 70.6 ± 7.3 yrs) were randomized to HSPT at 40% one-repetition maximum (1RM) (HSPT: n = 25; 3 sets of 12-14 repetitions), slow-speed strength training at 80%1RM (SSST: n = 25; 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions), or control (CON: n = 22; stretching) 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Leg press and knee extension peak power, peak power velocity, peak power force/torque, and braking speed were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks. HSPT increased peak power and peak power velocity across a range of external resistances (40-90% 1RM; P < 0.05) and improved braking speed (P < 0.05). Work was similar between groups, but perceived exertion was lower in HSPT (P < 0.05). Thus, the less strenuous HSPT exerted a broader training effect and improved braking speed compared to SSST.

No MeSH data available.