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Effects of saponins against clinical E. coli strains and eukaryotic cell line.

Arabski M, Węgierek-Ciuk A, Czerwonka G, Lankoff A, Kaca W - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Bottom Line: Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics.This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells.In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce, Poland. arabski@ujk.edu.pl

ABSTRACT
Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of saponins against CHO-K1 cells were measured by the MTT test, hemolysis assay and flow cytometry. Saponin from Quillaja saponaria has a cytotoxic effect at concentrations higher than 25 μg/mL and in the range of 12-50 μg/mL significantly increases the level of early apoptotic cells. Saponin at dose of 12 μg/mL enhances the six E. coli strains growth. We postulate that saponins increase the influx of nutrients from the medium into E. coli cells. Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics. In contrary, in the presence of saponins and antibiotics, more CFU/mL E. coli cells were observed. This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells. In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of the viability of CHO-K1 cells following treatment with saponin measured by the MTT assay; mean of three experiments ± SD. *P < 0.005.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Percentage of the viability of CHO-K1 cells following treatment with saponin measured by the MTT assay; mean of three experiments ± SD. *P < 0.005.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the percent viability of the CHO-K1 cells after 4-day treatment with saponin at concentrations ranging from 12 to 100 μg/mL measured by the MTT assay. It was found that saponin at concentrations 25 and 50 μg/mL caused 70% and 50% cell killing, respectively.


Effects of saponins against clinical E. coli strains and eukaryotic cell line.

Arabski M, Węgierek-Ciuk A, Czerwonka G, Lankoff A, Kaca W - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Percentage of the viability of CHO-K1 cells following treatment with saponin measured by the MTT assay; mean of three experiments ± SD. *P < 0.005.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303633&req=5

fig1: Percentage of the viability of CHO-K1 cells following treatment with saponin measured by the MTT assay; mean of three experiments ± SD. *P < 0.005.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the percent viability of the CHO-K1 cells after 4-day treatment with saponin at concentrations ranging from 12 to 100 μg/mL measured by the MTT assay. It was found that saponin at concentrations 25 and 50 μg/mL caused 70% and 50% cell killing, respectively.

Bottom Line: Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics.This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells.In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biology, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Kielce, Poland. arabski@ujk.edu.pl

ABSTRACT
Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of saponins against CHO-K1 cells were measured by the MTT test, hemolysis assay and flow cytometry. Saponin from Quillaja saponaria has a cytotoxic effect at concentrations higher than 25 μg/mL and in the range of 12-50 μg/mL significantly increases the level of early apoptotic cells. Saponin at dose of 12 μg/mL enhances the six E. coli strains growth. We postulate that saponins increase the influx of nutrients from the medium into E. coli cells. Saponins do not have synergetic effects on antibacterial action of tested antibiotics. In contrary, in the presence of saponins and antibiotics, more CFU/mL E. coli cells were observed. This effect was similar to saponins action alone towards E. coli cells. In conclusion, saponins was cytotoxic against CHO-K1 cells, whereas against E. coli cells this effect was not observed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus