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Varicose veins: role of mechanotransduction of venous hypertension.

Atta HM - Int J Vasc Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Varicose veins affect approximately one-third of the adult population and result in significant psychological, physical, and financial burden.The role of mechanotransduction of the high venous pressure in the pathogenesis of varicose vein formation has not been adequately investigated despite a good progress in understanding the mechanomolecular mechanisms involved in transduction of high blood pressure in the arterial wall.This paper summarized the current understanding of mechano-molecular pathways involved in transduction of hemodynamic forces induced by blood pressure and tries to relate this information to setting of venous hypertension in varicose veins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Misr-Aswan Road, El-Minia 61519, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Varicose veins affect approximately one-third of the adult population and result in significant psychological, physical, and financial burden. Nevertheless, the molecular pathogenesis of varicose vein formation remains unidentified. Venous hypertension exerted on veins of the lower extremity is considered the principal factor in varicose vein formation. The role of mechanotransduction of the high venous pressure in the pathogenesis of varicose vein formation has not been adequately investigated despite a good progress in understanding the mechanomolecular mechanisms involved in transduction of high blood pressure in the arterial wall. Understanding the nature of the mechanical forces, the mechanosensors and mechanotransducers in the vein wall, and the downstream signaling pathways will provide new molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of varicose veins. This paper summarized the current understanding of mechano-molecular pathways involved in transduction of hemodynamic forces induced by blood pressure and tries to relate this information to setting of venous hypertension in varicose veins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mechanosensors of circumferential stretch in ECs. Information is compiled for both arterial and venous ECs due to scarcity of studies on venous ECs. Not all ion channels are included. This illustration is not drawn to scale.
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fig2: Mechanosensors of circumferential stretch in ECs. Information is compiled for both arterial and venous ECs due to scarcity of studies on venous ECs. Not all ion channels are included. This illustration is not drawn to scale.

Mentions: Elevated venous pressure in the lower extremity veins during prolonged standing generates circumferential stretch of the vein wall and imposes mechanical stimulation on both ECs and SMCs. Among the most studied mechanosensing systems in response to circumferential stretch are the integrins, the flow-sensitive ion channels, and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) (Figure 2) [25–28]. Other candidate flow sensors that have been proposed include the glycocalyx and the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1/cadherin/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 complex [23, 29–34].


Varicose veins: role of mechanotransduction of venous hypertension.

Atta HM - Int J Vasc Med (2012)

Mechanosensors of circumferential stretch in ECs. Information is compiled for both arterial and venous ECs due to scarcity of studies on venous ECs. Not all ion channels are included. This illustration is not drawn to scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303599&req=5

fig2: Mechanosensors of circumferential stretch in ECs. Information is compiled for both arterial and venous ECs due to scarcity of studies on venous ECs. Not all ion channels are included. This illustration is not drawn to scale.
Mentions: Elevated venous pressure in the lower extremity veins during prolonged standing generates circumferential stretch of the vein wall and imposes mechanical stimulation on both ECs and SMCs. Among the most studied mechanosensing systems in response to circumferential stretch are the integrins, the flow-sensitive ion channels, and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) (Figure 2) [25–28]. Other candidate flow sensors that have been proposed include the glycocalyx and the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1/cadherin/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 complex [23, 29–34].

Bottom Line: Varicose veins affect approximately one-third of the adult population and result in significant psychological, physical, and financial burden.The role of mechanotransduction of the high venous pressure in the pathogenesis of varicose vein formation has not been adequately investigated despite a good progress in understanding the mechanomolecular mechanisms involved in transduction of high blood pressure in the arterial wall.This paper summarized the current understanding of mechano-molecular pathways involved in transduction of hemodynamic forces induced by blood pressure and tries to relate this information to setting of venous hypertension in varicose veins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Misr-Aswan Road, El-Minia 61519, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Varicose veins affect approximately one-third of the adult population and result in significant psychological, physical, and financial burden. Nevertheless, the molecular pathogenesis of varicose vein formation remains unidentified. Venous hypertension exerted on veins of the lower extremity is considered the principal factor in varicose vein formation. The role of mechanotransduction of the high venous pressure in the pathogenesis of varicose vein formation has not been adequately investigated despite a good progress in understanding the mechanomolecular mechanisms involved in transduction of high blood pressure in the arterial wall. Understanding the nature of the mechanical forces, the mechanosensors and mechanotransducers in the vein wall, and the downstream signaling pathways will provide new molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of varicose veins. This paper summarized the current understanding of mechano-molecular pathways involved in transduction of hemodynamic forces induced by blood pressure and tries to relate this information to setting of venous hypertension in varicose veins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus