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Nanoscale thermal probing.

Yue Y, Wang X - Nano Rev (2012)

Bottom Line: Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability.Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways.From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic of nanoscale temperature measurement under tip-induced near-field heating effect, sub-10 nm spatial resolution was obtained in this experiment. Reproduced with permission from Reference (9). American Chemical Society, Copyright (2011).
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Figure 0005: Schematic of nanoscale temperature measurement under tip-induced near-field heating effect, sub-10 nm spatial resolution was obtained in this experiment. Reproduced with permission from Reference (9). American Chemical Society, Copyright (2011).

Mentions: It has been demonstrated that the enhanced optical field will generate intensive heating in a nano-sized region, especially when the substrate is in contact with the tip. Using the Raman thermometry method, Yue et al. (9) studied the temperature rise in a silicon substrate under near-field laser heating. In their experiment (Fig. 5), an external continuous laser was adjusted to irradiate the contact region between the tip and sample. A strong optical field appears at the apex of the tip and intensive heating was generated at the subsurface of the substrate. The enhanced Raman signal from this region was captured for temperature determination. Based on the temperature dependence of Raman shift and peak analysis from Raman signal (left in Fig. 5), the localized temperature was probed with a spatial resolution down to sub-10 nm.


Nanoscale thermal probing.

Yue Y, Wang X - Nano Rev (2012)

Schematic of nanoscale temperature measurement under tip-induced near-field heating effect, sub-10 nm spatial resolution was obtained in this experiment. Reproduced with permission from Reference (9). American Chemical Society, Copyright (2011).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303495&req=5

Figure 0005: Schematic of nanoscale temperature measurement under tip-induced near-field heating effect, sub-10 nm spatial resolution was obtained in this experiment. Reproduced with permission from Reference (9). American Chemical Society, Copyright (2011).
Mentions: It has been demonstrated that the enhanced optical field will generate intensive heating in a nano-sized region, especially when the substrate is in contact with the tip. Using the Raman thermometry method, Yue et al. (9) studied the temperature rise in a silicon substrate under near-field laser heating. In their experiment (Fig. 5), an external continuous laser was adjusted to irradiate the contact region between the tip and sample. A strong optical field appears at the apex of the tip and intensive heating was generated at the subsurface of the substrate. The enhanced Raman signal from this region was captured for temperature determination. Based on the temperature dependence of Raman shift and peak analysis from Raman signal (left in Fig. 5), the localized temperature was probed with a spatial resolution down to sub-10 nm.

Bottom Line: Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability.Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways.From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

No MeSH data available.