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Different gastoroesophageal reflux symptoms of middle-aged to elderly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients.

Shimizu Y, Dobashi K, Kusano M, Mori M - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2011)

Bottom Line: Symptomatic differences and the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been clarified in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).The most distinctive symptom of asthma patients with GERD was an unusual sensation in the throat, while bloated stomach was the chief symptom of COPD patients with GERD, and these symptoms were associated with disease exacerbations.GERD symptoms differed between asthma and COPD patients, and the presence of GERD diagnosed by the FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Symptomatic differences and the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been clarified in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to assess the differences of GERD symptoms among asthma, COPD, and disease control patients, and determine the impact of GERD symptoms on exacerbation of asthma or COPD by using a new questionnaire for GERD. A total of 120 subjects underwent assessment with the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire, including 40 age-matched patients in each of the asthma, COPD, and disease control groups. Asthma and control patients had more regurgitation-related symptoms than COPD patients (p<0.05), while COPD patients had more dysmotility-related symptoms than asthma patients (p<0.01) or disease control patients (p<0.01). The most distinctive symptom of asthma patients with GERD was an unusual sensation in the throat, while bloated stomach was the chief symptom of COPD patients with GERD, and these symptoms were associated with disease exacerbations. The presence of GERD diagnosed by the total score of FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD. GERD symptoms differed between asthma and COPD patients, and the presence of GERD diagnosed by the FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chief symptoms in asthma patients (n = 10), COPD patients (n = 13) and disease control patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed as having GERD by the FSSG survey in each group. The total score for acid regurgitation-related symptoms (questions 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 12) and the total score for dysmotility-related symptoms (questions 2, 3, 5, 8, and 11) were compared. The number of patients in each group with a higher score for acid regurgitation symptoms (A>M), the same score for both symptoms (A = M), or a higher score for dysmotility symptoms (A<M) was examined. *Significant difference between asthma and COPD. #Significant difference between COPD and disease controls.
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Figure 2: Chief symptoms in asthma patients (n = 10), COPD patients (n = 13) and disease control patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed as having GERD by the FSSG survey in each group. The total score for acid regurgitation-related symptoms (questions 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 12) and the total score for dysmotility-related symptoms (questions 2, 3, 5, 8, and 11) were compared. The number of patients in each group with a higher score for acid regurgitation symptoms (A>M), the same score for both symptoms (A = M), or a higher score for dysmotility symptoms (A<M) was examined. *Significant difference between asthma and COPD. #Significant difference between COPD and disease controls.

Mentions: The unique feature of the FSSG is that the questions are divided into those covering acid regurgitation-related symptoms (questions 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 12) and those for gastric dysmotility-related symptoms (questions 2, 3, 5, 8, and 11). When regurgitation- and dysmotility-related symptoms were compared among each group, the number of patients showing predominance of regurgitation-related symptoms was higher in the asthma group (p<0.005) and the disease control group (p<0.01) than in the COPD group (Fig. 1). The number of patients showing predominance of dysmotility-related symptoms was higher in the COPD group than in the asthma group (p<0.005) and the disease control group (p<0.01). Among GERD-positive patients, the number of patients showing predominance of regurgitation-related symptoms was higher in the asthma group (p<0.01) and the disease control group (p<0.01) than in the COPD group, while the number with predominance of dysmotility-related symptoms was higher in the COPD group than in the asthma group (p<0.01) or the disease control group (p<0.01), as shown in Fig. 2. Presence GERD evaluated by FSSG was the risk of COPD exacerbation (OR = 4.8, 95% CI 1.25–18.5, p<0.05), however not in asthma (OR = 3.0, 95% CI 0.69–13.1) (Table 4).


Different gastoroesophageal reflux symptoms of middle-aged to elderly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients.

Shimizu Y, Dobashi K, Kusano M, Mori M - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2011)

Chief symptoms in asthma patients (n = 10), COPD patients (n = 13) and disease control patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed as having GERD by the FSSG survey in each group. The total score for acid regurgitation-related symptoms (questions 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 12) and the total score for dysmotility-related symptoms (questions 2, 3, 5, 8, and 11) were compared. The number of patients in each group with a higher score for acid regurgitation symptoms (A>M), the same score for both symptoms (A = M), or a higher score for dysmotility symptoms (A<M) was examined. *Significant difference between asthma and COPD. #Significant difference between COPD and disease controls.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3303481&req=5

Figure 2: Chief symptoms in asthma patients (n = 10), COPD patients (n = 13) and disease control patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed as having GERD by the FSSG survey in each group. The total score for acid regurgitation-related symptoms (questions 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 12) and the total score for dysmotility-related symptoms (questions 2, 3, 5, 8, and 11) were compared. The number of patients in each group with a higher score for acid regurgitation symptoms (A>M), the same score for both symptoms (A = M), or a higher score for dysmotility symptoms (A<M) was examined. *Significant difference between asthma and COPD. #Significant difference between COPD and disease controls.
Mentions: The unique feature of the FSSG is that the questions are divided into those covering acid regurgitation-related symptoms (questions 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 12) and those for gastric dysmotility-related symptoms (questions 2, 3, 5, 8, and 11). When regurgitation- and dysmotility-related symptoms were compared among each group, the number of patients showing predominance of regurgitation-related symptoms was higher in the asthma group (p<0.005) and the disease control group (p<0.01) than in the COPD group (Fig. 1). The number of patients showing predominance of dysmotility-related symptoms was higher in the COPD group than in the asthma group (p<0.005) and the disease control group (p<0.01). Among GERD-positive patients, the number of patients showing predominance of regurgitation-related symptoms was higher in the asthma group (p<0.01) and the disease control group (p<0.01) than in the COPD group, while the number with predominance of dysmotility-related symptoms was higher in the COPD group than in the asthma group (p<0.01) or the disease control group (p<0.01), as shown in Fig. 2. Presence GERD evaluated by FSSG was the risk of COPD exacerbation (OR = 4.8, 95% CI 1.25–18.5, p<0.05), however not in asthma (OR = 3.0, 95% CI 0.69–13.1) (Table 4).

Bottom Line: Symptomatic differences and the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been clarified in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).The most distinctive symptom of asthma patients with GERD was an unusual sensation in the throat, while bloated stomach was the chief symptom of COPD patients with GERD, and these symptoms were associated with disease exacerbations.GERD symptoms differed between asthma and COPD patients, and the presence of GERD diagnosed by the FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Symptomatic differences and the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been clarified in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to assess the differences of GERD symptoms among asthma, COPD, and disease control patients, and determine the impact of GERD symptoms on exacerbation of asthma or COPD by using a new questionnaire for GERD. A total of 120 subjects underwent assessment with the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire, including 40 age-matched patients in each of the asthma, COPD, and disease control groups. Asthma and control patients had more regurgitation-related symptoms than COPD patients (p<0.05), while COPD patients had more dysmotility-related symptoms than asthma patients (p<0.01) or disease control patients (p<0.01). The most distinctive symptom of asthma patients with GERD was an unusual sensation in the throat, while bloated stomach was the chief symptom of COPD patients with GERD, and these symptoms were associated with disease exacerbations. The presence of GERD diagnosed by the total score of FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD. GERD symptoms differed between asthma and COPD patients, and the presence of GERD diagnosed by the FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus