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The acute effects of a single session of expiratory muscle strength training on blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation in healthy adults.

Laciuga H, Davenport P, Sapienza C - Front Physiol (2012)

Bottom Line: Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is a rehabilitative program that has been tested for outcomes related to respiratory muscle strength, cough, swallow, and voice function in healthy young adult, elderly individuals, and in patients with progressive neurodegenerative disease.Because EMST has been used in patient care, the associated cardiovascular responses during EMST are of importance.This study investigated the changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) during one session of EMST in healthy, young adults as a preliminary study of device safety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida Gainesville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is a rehabilitative program that has been tested for outcomes related to respiratory muscle strength, cough, swallow, and voice function in healthy young adult, elderly individuals, and in patients with progressive neurodegenerative disease. Because EMST has been used in patient care, the associated cardiovascular responses during EMST are of importance. This study investigated the changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) during one session of EMST in healthy, young adults as a preliminary study of device safety. Thirty-one participants completed a single session of 25 trials with the EMST device. Valsalva maneuvers were performed at the beginning and at the end of the EMST trials for task comparison. The SBP, DBP, HR, and SpO(2) were recorded at the baseline and after completing the following tasks: a Valsalva maneuver, 12 trials using the EMST device, 13 trials using the EMST device, and 5 min of rest following the EMST session. A mixed linear model tested for changes across the six time points. The results indicated no significant change of SBP, DBP, HR, or SpO(2) during or following the EMST trials or after performing the Valsalva maneuver. The results suggest that EMST does not elicit significant fluctuations of blood pressure, HR, and SpO(2) in healthy young adults even when considering the effects of covariates on the outcomes measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The changes in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) across the tasks.
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Figure 2: The changes in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) across the tasks.

Mentions: Diastolic blood pressure was normally distributed across all data points with mean of 75 mmHg and SD of 6.8 mmHg (Figure 2). The minimum was 61 mmHg and the maximum was 98 mmHg. DBP did not change significantly across tasks (p = 0.8261). Sex had a significant effect on DBP (F = 9.42; df = 1,176; p = 0.0025), with women tending to have lower mean DBP across all tasks. Mean DBP for men in the study was 79.1 mmHg (SD = 6.92). Mean DBP for women was 74 mmHg (SD = 6.19). BMI had a significant effect on DBP (F = 6.22; df = 1,176; p = 0.0135), with DBP increasing with BMI. Mean DBP is estimated to increase by 0.48 mmHg for each additional point of BMI (95% CI = [0.103, 0.859]).


The acute effects of a single session of expiratory muscle strength training on blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation in healthy adults.

Laciuga H, Davenport P, Sapienza C - Front Physiol (2012)

The changes in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) across the tasks.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3299977&req=5

Figure 2: The changes in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) across the tasks.
Mentions: Diastolic blood pressure was normally distributed across all data points with mean of 75 mmHg and SD of 6.8 mmHg (Figure 2). The minimum was 61 mmHg and the maximum was 98 mmHg. DBP did not change significantly across tasks (p = 0.8261). Sex had a significant effect on DBP (F = 9.42; df = 1,176; p = 0.0025), with women tending to have lower mean DBP across all tasks. Mean DBP for men in the study was 79.1 mmHg (SD = 6.92). Mean DBP for women was 74 mmHg (SD = 6.19). BMI had a significant effect on DBP (F = 6.22; df = 1,176; p = 0.0135), with DBP increasing with BMI. Mean DBP is estimated to increase by 0.48 mmHg for each additional point of BMI (95% CI = [0.103, 0.859]).

Bottom Line: Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is a rehabilitative program that has been tested for outcomes related to respiratory muscle strength, cough, swallow, and voice function in healthy young adult, elderly individuals, and in patients with progressive neurodegenerative disease.Because EMST has been used in patient care, the associated cardiovascular responses during EMST are of importance.This study investigated the changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) during one session of EMST in healthy, young adults as a preliminary study of device safety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida Gainesville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is a rehabilitative program that has been tested for outcomes related to respiratory muscle strength, cough, swallow, and voice function in healthy young adult, elderly individuals, and in patients with progressive neurodegenerative disease. Because EMST has been used in patient care, the associated cardiovascular responses during EMST are of importance. This study investigated the changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) during one session of EMST in healthy, young adults as a preliminary study of device safety. Thirty-one participants completed a single session of 25 trials with the EMST device. Valsalva maneuvers were performed at the beginning and at the end of the EMST trials for task comparison. The SBP, DBP, HR, and SpO(2) were recorded at the baseline and after completing the following tasks: a Valsalva maneuver, 12 trials using the EMST device, 13 trials using the EMST device, and 5 min of rest following the EMST session. A mixed linear model tested for changes across the six time points. The results indicated no significant change of SBP, DBP, HR, or SpO(2) during or following the EMST trials or after performing the Valsalva maneuver. The results suggest that EMST does not elicit significant fluctuations of blood pressure, HR, and SpO(2) in healthy young adults even when considering the effects of covariates on the outcomes measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus