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Migration of intervertebral disc cells into dense collagen scaffolds intended for functional replacement.

Bron JL, Mulder HW, Vonk LA, Doulabi BZ, Oudhoff MJ, Smit TH - J Mater Sci Mater Med (2012)

Bottom Line: The aim of current study was to assess whether NP and surrounding annulus fibrosus (AF) cells are capable of migrating into dense collagen scaffolds.We seeded freshly harvested caprine NP and AF cells onto scaffolds consisting of 1.5 and 3.0% type I collagen matrices, prepared by plastic compression, to assess cell invasion.The migration distance appeared both time and density dependent and was higher for NP (25%) compared to AF (10%) cells after 4 weeks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. jl.bron@vumc.nl

ABSTRACT
Invasion of cells from surrounding tissues is a crucial step for regeneration when using a-cellular scaffolds as a replacement of the nucleus pulposus (NP). The aim of current study was to assess whether NP and surrounding annulus fibrosus (AF) cells are capable of migrating into dense collagen scaffolds. We seeded freshly harvested caprine NP and AF cells onto scaffolds consisting of 1.5 and 3.0% type I collagen matrices, prepared by plastic compression, to assess cell invasion. The migration distance appeared both time and density dependent and was higher for NP (25%) compared to AF (10%) cells after 4 weeks. Migration distance was not enhanced by Hst-2, a peptide derived from saliva known to enhance fibroblast migration, and this was confirmed in a scratch assay. In conclusion, we revealed invasion of cells into dense collagen scaffolds and therewith encouraging first steps towards the use of a-cellular scaffolds for NP replacement.

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Graphic showing the results of the migration experiments of NP (white bars) and AF (black bars) cells after 14 and 28 days in 1.5 and 3% collagen matrices. After 14 days, no significant differences are observed. After 28 days, NP cells show a significantly higher migration compared to the AF cells. For both cell types the migration is higher in the 1.5 compared to the 3% collagen scaffolds
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Fig4: Graphic showing the results of the migration experiments of NP (white bars) and AF (black bars) cells after 14 and 28 days in 1.5 and 3% collagen matrices. After 14 days, no significant differences are observed. After 28 days, NP cells show a significantly higher migration compared to the AF cells. For both cell types the migration is higher in the 1.5 compared to the 3% collagen scaffolds

Mentions: After 14 days, there were no significant differences in the migration distance between NP (white bars) or AF (black bars) cells (Fig. 4). In both series, the 1.5% and the 3% scaffolds, the mean migration distance was limited to approximately 5% (~180 μm) of the full scaffolds thickness. After 28 days, the migration distance of the NP cells had significantly increased compared to 14 days, while no differences were observed for the AF cells (Fig. 4). The mean migration distance of the NP cells after 28 days was significantly higher compared to the AF cells in both scaffolds densities. For the 1.5% collagen scaffolds the mean distance was 25% (~0.9 mm) for the NP cells compared to 9.5% (~0.35 mm) for the AF cells (P < 0.05). For both cell types, a significant higher migration distance was observed in the 1.5% collagen scaffolds compared to the 3% scaffolds (Fig. 4). The collagen scaffolds were too dense to visualise cells in the deeper layers of the scaffold. An example of the surface area of a scaffold is shown in Fig. 5.Fig. 4


Migration of intervertebral disc cells into dense collagen scaffolds intended for functional replacement.

Bron JL, Mulder HW, Vonk LA, Doulabi BZ, Oudhoff MJ, Smit TH - J Mater Sci Mater Med (2012)

Graphic showing the results of the migration experiments of NP (white bars) and AF (black bars) cells after 14 and 28 days in 1.5 and 3% collagen matrices. After 14 days, no significant differences are observed. After 28 days, NP cells show a significantly higher migration compared to the AF cells. For both cell types the migration is higher in the 1.5 compared to the 3% collagen scaffolds
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3299969&req=5

Fig4: Graphic showing the results of the migration experiments of NP (white bars) and AF (black bars) cells after 14 and 28 days in 1.5 and 3% collagen matrices. After 14 days, no significant differences are observed. After 28 days, NP cells show a significantly higher migration compared to the AF cells. For both cell types the migration is higher in the 1.5 compared to the 3% collagen scaffolds
Mentions: After 14 days, there were no significant differences in the migration distance between NP (white bars) or AF (black bars) cells (Fig. 4). In both series, the 1.5% and the 3% scaffolds, the mean migration distance was limited to approximately 5% (~180 μm) of the full scaffolds thickness. After 28 days, the migration distance of the NP cells had significantly increased compared to 14 days, while no differences were observed for the AF cells (Fig. 4). The mean migration distance of the NP cells after 28 days was significantly higher compared to the AF cells in both scaffolds densities. For the 1.5% collagen scaffolds the mean distance was 25% (~0.9 mm) for the NP cells compared to 9.5% (~0.35 mm) for the AF cells (P < 0.05). For both cell types, a significant higher migration distance was observed in the 1.5% collagen scaffolds compared to the 3% scaffolds (Fig. 4). The collagen scaffolds were too dense to visualise cells in the deeper layers of the scaffold. An example of the surface area of a scaffold is shown in Fig. 5.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: The aim of current study was to assess whether NP and surrounding annulus fibrosus (AF) cells are capable of migrating into dense collagen scaffolds.We seeded freshly harvested caprine NP and AF cells onto scaffolds consisting of 1.5 and 3.0% type I collagen matrices, prepared by plastic compression, to assess cell invasion.The migration distance appeared both time and density dependent and was higher for NP (25%) compared to AF (10%) cells after 4 weeks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. jl.bron@vumc.nl

ABSTRACT
Invasion of cells from surrounding tissues is a crucial step for regeneration when using a-cellular scaffolds as a replacement of the nucleus pulposus (NP). The aim of current study was to assess whether NP and surrounding annulus fibrosus (AF) cells are capable of migrating into dense collagen scaffolds. We seeded freshly harvested caprine NP and AF cells onto scaffolds consisting of 1.5 and 3.0% type I collagen matrices, prepared by plastic compression, to assess cell invasion. The migration distance appeared both time and density dependent and was higher for NP (25%) compared to AF (10%) cells after 4 weeks. Migration distance was not enhanced by Hst-2, a peptide derived from saliva known to enhance fibroblast migration, and this was confirmed in a scratch assay. In conclusion, we revealed invasion of cells into dense collagen scaffolds and therewith encouraging first steps towards the use of a-cellular scaffolds for NP replacement.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus