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Predictors for patient knowledge and reported behaviour regarding driving under the influence of medicines: a multi-country survey.

Monteiro SP, van Dijk L, Verstraete AG, Alvarez FJ, Heissing M, de Gier JJ - BMC Public Health (2012)

Bottom Line: Information provided to or accessed by patients does not influence knowledge.Patients who experienced side effects and who have a negative attitude towards driving under the influence of impairing medicines are more prone to change their driving frequency behaviour than those who use their motorised vehicles on a daily basis or those who use anti-allergic medicines.Future research should not only focus on information campaigns for patients but also for healthcare providers as this might contribute to improve communications with patients regarding the risks of driving under the influence of medicines.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacotherapy and Pharmaceutical Care, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. s.p.monteiro@rug.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Reports on the state of knowledge about medicines and driving showed an increased concern about the role that the use of medicines might play in car crashes. Much of patient knowledge regarding medicines comes from communications with healthcare professionals. This study, part of the DRUID (Driving Under the Influence of Drugs, alcohol and medicines) project, was carried out in four European countries and attempts to define predictors for knowledge of patients who use driving-impairing medicines. The influence of socio-demographic variables on patient knowledge was investigated as well as the influence of socio-demographic factors, knowledge and attitudes on patients' reported behaviour regarding driving under the influence of medicines.

Methods: Pharmacists handed out questionnaires to patients who met the inclusion criteria: 1) prevalent user of benzodiazepines, antidepressants or first generation antihistamines for systemic use; 2) age between 18 and 75 years old and 3) actual driver of a motorised vehicle. Factors affecting knowledge and reported behaviour towards driving-impairing medicines were analysed by means of multiple linear regression analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis, respectively.

Results: A total of 633 questionnaires (out of 3.607 that were distributed to patients) were analysed. Patient knowledge regarding driving under the influence of medicines is better in younger and higher educated patients. Information provided to or accessed by patients does not influence knowledge. Patients who experienced side effects and who have a negative attitude towards driving under the influence of impairing medicines are more prone to change their driving frequency behaviour than those who use their motorised vehicles on a daily basis or those who use anti-allergic medicines.

Conclusions: Changes in driving behaviour can be predicted by negative attitudes towards driving under the influence of medicines but not by patients' knowledge regarding driving under the influence of medicines. Future research should not only focus on information campaigns for patients but also for healthcare providers as this might contribute to improve communications with patients regarding the risks of driving under the influence of medicines.

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Theoretical model to determine predictors for patient knowledge and reported behavior.
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Figure 1: Theoretical model to determine predictors for patient knowledge and reported behavior.

Mentions: Having the TBP and TIB as a main reference, this research attempts to determine predictors that can influence not only patients' reported behaviour, but also their knowledge. In a simplified way, the theoretical reasoning behind the construction of the models was based on the assumption that socio-demographic characteristics play a central role in knowledge (evaluated as knowledge about risk of having a traffic accident). Both socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge in combination with attitudes, defined as feelings towards driving under the influence of medicines, were used to predict reported behavior (in terms of change in driving frequency and/or in terms of change in the use of medicines). Figure 1 exemplifies the model that was developed based upon mentioned theoretical insights. The present study is part of DRUID, and it was conducted in 4 countries.


Predictors for patient knowledge and reported behaviour regarding driving under the influence of medicines: a multi-country survey.

Monteiro SP, van Dijk L, Verstraete AG, Alvarez FJ, Heissing M, de Gier JJ - BMC Public Health (2012)

Theoretical model to determine predictors for patient knowledge and reported behavior.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3298461&req=5

Figure 1: Theoretical model to determine predictors for patient knowledge and reported behavior.
Mentions: Having the TBP and TIB as a main reference, this research attempts to determine predictors that can influence not only patients' reported behaviour, but also their knowledge. In a simplified way, the theoretical reasoning behind the construction of the models was based on the assumption that socio-demographic characteristics play a central role in knowledge (evaluated as knowledge about risk of having a traffic accident). Both socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge in combination with attitudes, defined as feelings towards driving under the influence of medicines, were used to predict reported behavior (in terms of change in driving frequency and/or in terms of change in the use of medicines). Figure 1 exemplifies the model that was developed based upon mentioned theoretical insights. The present study is part of DRUID, and it was conducted in 4 countries.

Bottom Line: Information provided to or accessed by patients does not influence knowledge.Patients who experienced side effects and who have a negative attitude towards driving under the influence of impairing medicines are more prone to change their driving frequency behaviour than those who use their motorised vehicles on a daily basis or those who use anti-allergic medicines.Future research should not only focus on information campaigns for patients but also for healthcare providers as this might contribute to improve communications with patients regarding the risks of driving under the influence of medicines.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacotherapy and Pharmaceutical Care, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. s.p.monteiro@rug.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Reports on the state of knowledge about medicines and driving showed an increased concern about the role that the use of medicines might play in car crashes. Much of patient knowledge regarding medicines comes from communications with healthcare professionals. This study, part of the DRUID (Driving Under the Influence of Drugs, alcohol and medicines) project, was carried out in four European countries and attempts to define predictors for knowledge of patients who use driving-impairing medicines. The influence of socio-demographic variables on patient knowledge was investigated as well as the influence of socio-demographic factors, knowledge and attitudes on patients' reported behaviour regarding driving under the influence of medicines.

Methods: Pharmacists handed out questionnaires to patients who met the inclusion criteria: 1) prevalent user of benzodiazepines, antidepressants or first generation antihistamines for systemic use; 2) age between 18 and 75 years old and 3) actual driver of a motorised vehicle. Factors affecting knowledge and reported behaviour towards driving-impairing medicines were analysed by means of multiple linear regression analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis, respectively.

Results: A total of 633 questionnaires (out of 3.607 that were distributed to patients) were analysed. Patient knowledge regarding driving under the influence of medicines is better in younger and higher educated patients. Information provided to or accessed by patients does not influence knowledge. Patients who experienced side effects and who have a negative attitude towards driving under the influence of impairing medicines are more prone to change their driving frequency behaviour than those who use their motorised vehicles on a daily basis or those who use anti-allergic medicines.

Conclusions: Changes in driving behaviour can be predicted by negative attitudes towards driving under the influence of medicines but not by patients' knowledge regarding driving under the influence of medicines. Future research should not only focus on information campaigns for patients but also for healthcare providers as this might contribute to improve communications with patients regarding the risks of driving under the influence of medicines.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus