Limits...
Hepatitis E virus infection without reactivation in solid-organ transplant recipients, France.

Legrand-Abravanel F, Kamar N, Sandres-Saune K, Lhomme S, Mansuy JM, Muscari F, Sallusto F, Rostaing L, Izopet J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2011)

Bottom Line: We found no HEV reactivation among patients with antibodies against HEV at the first annual checkup or by measuring liver enzyme activities and HEV RNA.In contrast, we found 34 locally acquired HEV infections among patients with no antibodies against HEV, 47% of whom had a chronic infection, resulting in an incidence of 3.2/100 person-years.Effective prophylactic measures that include those for potential zoonotic infections should reduce the risk for HEV transmission in this population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse, France. abravanel.f@chu-toulouse.fr

ABSTRACT
Infections with hepatitis E virus (HEV) in solid-organ transplant recipients can lead to chronic hepatitis. However, the incidence of de novo HEV infections after transplantation and risk for reactivation in patients with antibodies against HEV before transplantation are unknown. Pretransplant prevalence of these antibodies in 700 solid-organ transplant recipients at Toulouse University Hospital in France was 14.1%. We found no HEV reactivation among patients with antibodies against HEV at the first annual checkup or by measuring liver enzyme activities and HEV RNA. In contrast, we found 34 locally acquired HEV infections among patients with no antibodies against HEV, 47% of whom had a chronic infection, resulting in an incidence of 3.2/100 person-years. Independent risk factors for HEV infection were an age <52 years at transplantation and receiving a liver transplant. Effective prophylactic measures that include those for potential zoonotic infections should reduce the risk for HEV transmission in this population.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) markers in 700 solid-organ transplant recipients, France, January 2004–December 2008. Ig, immunoglobulin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3298369&req=5

F-2-1: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) markers in 700 solid-organ transplant recipients, France, January 2004–December 2008. Ig, immunoglobulin.

Mentions: Blood samples from 700 SOT recipients were screened on the day of transplantation. Median age of patients at transplantation was 52 years (range 18–79 years); 459 (65.6%) of the patients were men (Table 1). No demographic or clinical factors were associated with pretransplant antibodies against HEV. IgG, IgM, or both antibodies against HEV were found in 99 patients (14.1%): 77 of the 529 kidney-transplant patients (14.5%) and 22 of the 171 liver-transplant patients (12.9%) (Figure 1). Serum from 17 patients (2.4%) contained HEV IgM (7 of these patients were also IgG positive). None of the 99 patients who had antibodies against HEV had HEV RNA. Pretransplant seroprevalence varied according to year of transplantation (range 8.7%–16.3%), although these variations were not significant.


Hepatitis E virus infection without reactivation in solid-organ transplant recipients, France.

Legrand-Abravanel F, Kamar N, Sandres-Saune K, Lhomme S, Mansuy JM, Muscari F, Sallusto F, Rostaing L, Izopet J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2011)

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) markers in 700 solid-organ transplant recipients, France, January 2004–December 2008. Ig, immunoglobulin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3298369&req=5

F-2-1: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) markers in 700 solid-organ transplant recipients, France, January 2004–December 2008. Ig, immunoglobulin.
Mentions: Blood samples from 700 SOT recipients were screened on the day of transplantation. Median age of patients at transplantation was 52 years (range 18–79 years); 459 (65.6%) of the patients were men (Table 1). No demographic or clinical factors were associated with pretransplant antibodies against HEV. IgG, IgM, or both antibodies against HEV were found in 99 patients (14.1%): 77 of the 529 kidney-transplant patients (14.5%) and 22 of the 171 liver-transplant patients (12.9%) (Figure 1). Serum from 17 patients (2.4%) contained HEV IgM (7 of these patients were also IgG positive). None of the 99 patients who had antibodies against HEV had HEV RNA. Pretransplant seroprevalence varied according to year of transplantation (range 8.7%–16.3%), although these variations were not significant.

Bottom Line: We found no HEV reactivation among patients with antibodies against HEV at the first annual checkup or by measuring liver enzyme activities and HEV RNA.In contrast, we found 34 locally acquired HEV infections among patients with no antibodies against HEV, 47% of whom had a chronic infection, resulting in an incidence of 3.2/100 person-years.Effective prophylactic measures that include those for potential zoonotic infections should reduce the risk for HEV transmission in this population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse, France. abravanel.f@chu-toulouse.fr

ABSTRACT
Infections with hepatitis E virus (HEV) in solid-organ transplant recipients can lead to chronic hepatitis. However, the incidence of de novo HEV infections after transplantation and risk for reactivation in patients with antibodies against HEV before transplantation are unknown. Pretransplant prevalence of these antibodies in 700 solid-organ transplant recipients at Toulouse University Hospital in France was 14.1%. We found no HEV reactivation among patients with antibodies against HEV at the first annual checkup or by measuring liver enzyme activities and HEV RNA. In contrast, we found 34 locally acquired HEV infections among patients with no antibodies against HEV, 47% of whom had a chronic infection, resulting in an incidence of 3.2/100 person-years. Independent risk factors for HEV infection were an age <52 years at transplantation and receiving a liver transplant. Effective prophylactic measures that include those for potential zoonotic infections should reduce the risk for HEV transmission in this population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus