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Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 surveillance for severe illness and response, New York, New York, USA, April-July 2009.

Balter S, Gupta LS, Lim S, Fu J, Perlman SE, New York City 2009 H1N1 Flu Investigation Te - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Bottom Line: Nearly half were <18 years of age.Surveillance data were critical in guiding the DOHMH response.The DOHMH experience during this outbreak illustrates the need for the capacity to rapidly expand and modify surveillance to adapt to changing conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York 10013, USA.

ABSTRACT
On April 23, 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) was notified of a school outbreak of respiratory illness; 2 days later the infection was identified as pandemic (H1N1) 2009. This was the first major outbreak of the illness in the United States. To guide decisions on the public health response, the DOHMH used active hospital-based surveillance and then enhanced passive reporting to collect data on demographics, risk conditions, and clinical severity. This surveillance identified 996 hospitalized patients with confirmed or probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection from April 24 to July 7; fifty percent lived in high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly half were <18 years of age. Surveillance data were critical in guiding the DOHMH response. The DOHMH experience during this outbreak illustrates the need for the capacity to rapidly expand and modify surveillance to adapt to changing conditions.

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Hospitalized patients with confirmed or probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of onset, New York, New York, USA, April 24–July 7, 2009. Onset date was missing for 98 patients with confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and 16 with probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Surveillance data as of August 25, 2009.
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Figure 1: Hospitalized patients with confirmed or probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of onset, New York, New York, USA, April 24–July 7, 2009. Onset date was missing for 98 patients with confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and 16 with probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Surveillance data as of August 25, 2009.

Mentions: By July 7, the end of the second ICS activation, 996 patients had been hospitalized. The distribution of 996 hospitalized case-patients (929 confirmed and 67 probable) over time, including the increased incidence in late May, can be seen in Figure 1. From April 24 through July 7, the estimated age-adjusted rate of confirmed and probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009 hospitalizations was 12.3/100,000 NYC residents (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.8–13.4). The rate among patients <4 years of age (40.9/100,000, 95% CI 35.6-46.3) was almost 7× that among those >65 years of age (6.0/100,000, 95% CI 4.5–7.7) (Table). The estimated age-adjusted rate of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 hospitalized patients in high-poverty neighborhoods (18.4/100,000, 95% CI 16.8–20.1) was significantly higher than that in low-poverty neighborhoods (8.9/100,000, 95% CI 7.6–10.4) (Table; Figure 2).


Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 surveillance for severe illness and response, New York, New York, USA, April-July 2009.

Balter S, Gupta LS, Lim S, Fu J, Perlman SE, New York City 2009 H1N1 Flu Investigation Te - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Hospitalized patients with confirmed or probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of onset, New York, New York, USA, April 24–July 7, 2009. Onset date was missing for 98 patients with confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and 16 with probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Surveillance data as of August 25, 2009.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3298321&req=5

Figure 1: Hospitalized patients with confirmed or probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of onset, New York, New York, USA, April 24–July 7, 2009. Onset date was missing for 98 patients with confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and 16 with probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Surveillance data as of August 25, 2009.
Mentions: By July 7, the end of the second ICS activation, 996 patients had been hospitalized. The distribution of 996 hospitalized case-patients (929 confirmed and 67 probable) over time, including the increased incidence in late May, can be seen in Figure 1. From April 24 through July 7, the estimated age-adjusted rate of confirmed and probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009 hospitalizations was 12.3/100,000 NYC residents (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.8–13.4). The rate among patients <4 years of age (40.9/100,000, 95% CI 35.6-46.3) was almost 7× that among those >65 years of age (6.0/100,000, 95% CI 4.5–7.7) (Table). The estimated age-adjusted rate of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 hospitalized patients in high-poverty neighborhoods (18.4/100,000, 95% CI 16.8–20.1) was significantly higher than that in low-poverty neighborhoods (8.9/100,000, 95% CI 7.6–10.4) (Table; Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Nearly half were <18 years of age.Surveillance data were critical in guiding the DOHMH response.The DOHMH experience during this outbreak illustrates the need for the capacity to rapidly expand and modify surveillance to adapt to changing conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York 10013, USA.

ABSTRACT
On April 23, 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) was notified of a school outbreak of respiratory illness; 2 days later the infection was identified as pandemic (H1N1) 2009. This was the first major outbreak of the illness in the United States. To guide decisions on the public health response, the DOHMH used active hospital-based surveillance and then enhanced passive reporting to collect data on demographics, risk conditions, and clinical severity. This surveillance identified 996 hospitalized patients with confirmed or probable pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection from April 24 to July 7; fifty percent lived in high-poverty neighborhoods. Nearly half were <18 years of age. Surveillance data were critical in guiding the DOHMH response. The DOHMH experience during this outbreak illustrates the need for the capacity to rapidly expand and modify surveillance to adapt to changing conditions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus