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White-nose syndrome fungus (Geomyces destructans) in bats, Europe.

Wibbelt G, Kurth A, Hellmann D, Weishaar M, Barlow A, Veith M, Prüger J, Görföl T, Grosche L, Bontadina F, Zöphel U, Seidl HP, Seidl HP, Blehert DS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Bottom Line: Typical signs of this infection were not observed in bats in North America before white-nose syndrome was detected.However, unconfirmed reports from Europe indicated white fungal growth on hibernating bats without associated deaths.We hypothesize that G. destructans is present throughout Europe and that bats in Europe may be more immunologically or behaviorally resistant to G. destructans than their congeners in North America because they potentially coevolved with the fungus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
White-nose syndrome is an emerging disease in North America that has caused substantial declines in hibernating bats. A recently identified fungus (Geomyces destructans) causes skin lesions that are characteristic of this disease. Typical signs of this infection were not observed in bats in North America before white-nose syndrome was detected. However, unconfirmed reports from Europe indicated white fungal growth on hibernating bats without associated deaths. To investigate these differences, hibernating bats were sampled in Germany, Switzerland, and Hungary to determine whether G. destructans is present in Europe. Microscopic observations, fungal culture, and genetic analyses of 43 samples from 23 bats indicated that 21 bats of 5 species in 3 countries were colonized by G. destructans. We hypothesize that G. destructans is present throughout Europe and that bats in Europe may be more immunologically or behaviorally resistant to G. destructans than their congeners in North America because they potentially coevolved with the fungus.

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Locations in Europe of bats positive for Geomyces destructans by PCR alone (circles) or by PCR and culture (solid stars) and bats negative for G. destructans but positive for other fungi (square). Numbers for locations correspond to those in Table 2. Sites 7, 8, and 9 had additional bats that were positive for G. destructans only by PCR. Location of a bat positive for G. destructans in France (16) is indicated by an open star. Some sites had >1 bat species with evidence of colonization by G.destructans.
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Figure 2: Locations in Europe of bats positive for Geomyces destructans by PCR alone (circles) or by PCR and culture (solid stars) and bats negative for G. destructans but positive for other fungi (square). Numbers for locations correspond to those in Table 2. Sites 7, 8, and 9 had additional bats that were positive for G. destructans only by PCR. Location of a bat positive for G. destructans in France (16) is indicated by an open star. Some sites had >1 bat species with evidence of colonization by G.destructans.

Mentions: After direct PCR amplification and DNA sequence analysis of fungal rRNA gene ITS regions, genetic signatures 100% identical with those from G. destructans type isolate NWHC 20631–21 (GenBank accession no. EU884921) were identified from 21 of 23 bats examined: 15/15 from Germany, 2/2 from Hungary, and 4/4 from Switzerland. Both bats from the United Kingdom were colonized by Penicillium sp. (Tables 1, 2). Fungi with conidia morphologically identical to those of G. destructans (Figure 1, panel B) as described by Gargas et al. (6) were isolated in axenic cultures from 8 of 23 bats examined: 3/15 from Germany, 1/2 from Hungary, and 4/4 from Switzerland) (Tables 1, 2; Figure 2).


White-nose syndrome fungus (Geomyces destructans) in bats, Europe.

Wibbelt G, Kurth A, Hellmann D, Weishaar M, Barlow A, Veith M, Prüger J, Görföl T, Grosche L, Bontadina F, Zöphel U, Seidl HP, Seidl HP, Blehert DS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Locations in Europe of bats positive for Geomyces destructans by PCR alone (circles) or by PCR and culture (solid stars) and bats negative for G. destructans but positive for other fungi (square). Numbers for locations correspond to those in Table 2. Sites 7, 8, and 9 had additional bats that were positive for G. destructans only by PCR. Location of a bat positive for G. destructans in France (16) is indicated by an open star. Some sites had >1 bat species with evidence of colonization by G.destructans.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3298319&req=5

Figure 2: Locations in Europe of bats positive for Geomyces destructans by PCR alone (circles) or by PCR and culture (solid stars) and bats negative for G. destructans but positive for other fungi (square). Numbers for locations correspond to those in Table 2. Sites 7, 8, and 9 had additional bats that were positive for G. destructans only by PCR. Location of a bat positive for G. destructans in France (16) is indicated by an open star. Some sites had >1 bat species with evidence of colonization by G.destructans.
Mentions: After direct PCR amplification and DNA sequence analysis of fungal rRNA gene ITS regions, genetic signatures 100% identical with those from G. destructans type isolate NWHC 20631–21 (GenBank accession no. EU884921) were identified from 21 of 23 bats examined: 15/15 from Germany, 2/2 from Hungary, and 4/4 from Switzerland. Both bats from the United Kingdom were colonized by Penicillium sp. (Tables 1, 2). Fungi with conidia morphologically identical to those of G. destructans (Figure 1, panel B) as described by Gargas et al. (6) were isolated in axenic cultures from 8 of 23 bats examined: 3/15 from Germany, 1/2 from Hungary, and 4/4 from Switzerland) (Tables 1, 2; Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Typical signs of this infection were not observed in bats in North America before white-nose syndrome was detected.However, unconfirmed reports from Europe indicated white fungal growth on hibernating bats without associated deaths.We hypothesize that G. destructans is present throughout Europe and that bats in Europe may be more immunologically or behaviorally resistant to G. destructans than their congeners in North America because they potentially coevolved with the fungus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
White-nose syndrome is an emerging disease in North America that has caused substantial declines in hibernating bats. A recently identified fungus (Geomyces destructans) causes skin lesions that are characteristic of this disease. Typical signs of this infection were not observed in bats in North America before white-nose syndrome was detected. However, unconfirmed reports from Europe indicated white fungal growth on hibernating bats without associated deaths. To investigate these differences, hibernating bats were sampled in Germany, Switzerland, and Hungary to determine whether G. destructans is present in Europe. Microscopic observations, fungal culture, and genetic analyses of 43 samples from 23 bats indicated that 21 bats of 5 species in 3 countries were colonized by G. destructans. We hypothesize that G. destructans is present throughout Europe and that bats in Europe may be more immunologically or behaviorally resistant to G. destructans than their congeners in North America because they potentially coevolved with the fungus.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus