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Use of human senses as sensors.

Sugawara Y, Sugimoto C, Minabe S, Iura Y, Okazaki M, Nakagawa N, Seto M, Maruyama S, Hirano M, Kitayama I - Sensors (Basel) (2009)

Bottom Line: In the latter study, we employed a sensory test for evaluating changes in perception of a given aroma.The perception of fragrance was assessed by 13 contrasting pairs of adjectives as a function of the task assigned to participants.The obtained findings illustrate subtle nuances regarding how essential oils manifest their potency and how olfactory discrimination and responses occur in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan.

ABSTRACT
This paper is an overview of our recent findings obtained by the use of human senses as sensors, suggesting that human senses might be indispensable sensors, not only for practical uses but also for gaining a deeper understanding of humans. From this point of view, two kinds of studies, both based on semantic responses of participants, deserve emphasis. One study assessed the efficacy of the photocatalytic elimination of stains or bio-aerosols from an air environment using TiO(2) as well as the photocatalytic deodorizing efficacy of a TiO(2)-type deodorizer; the other study evaluated the changes in perception of a given aroma while inhaling the fragrance of essential oils. In the latter study, we employed a sensory test for evaluating changes in perception of a given aroma. Sensory tests were conducted twice, when participants were undergoing the Kraepelin mental performance test (mental arithmetic) or an auditory task (listening to environmental natural sounds), once before the task (pre-task) and once after the task (post-task). The perception of fragrance was assessed by 13 contrasting pairs of adjectives as a function of the task assigned to participants. The obtained findings illustrate subtle nuances regarding how essential oils manifest their potency and how olfactory discrimination and responses occur in humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The observed skin temperature changes following inhalation of peppermint in relation to the auditory task. Redrawn from Sugawara et al. [14]. The numbers assigned to the graph represent the sensor spots on the left hand: 1, the tip of the thumb; 2, the tip of the first finger; 3, the tip of the second finger; 4, the tip of the third finger; 5, the tip of the fourth finger, and 6, the palm. The number of subjects was 20.
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f7-sensors-09-03184: The observed skin temperature changes following inhalation of peppermint in relation to the auditory task. Redrawn from Sugawara et al. [14]. The numbers assigned to the graph represent the sensor spots on the left hand: 1, the tip of the thumb; 2, the tip of the first finger; 3, the tip of the second finger; 4, the tip of the third finger; 5, the tip of the fourth finger, and 6, the palm. The number of subjects was 20.

Mentions: On the basis of the verbal responses elicited by smelling presented stimuli, possible skin temperature changes while inhaling the fragrance of two essential oils (peppermint and spearmint) and one monoterpenoid (linalool) were concurrently monitored by a multi-channel skin thermometer as a function of the task assigned to the subjects in order to examine the relationship between subjective emotional perception of odor and its physiological effects [13,14]. Figure 7 depicts an example of skin temperature experiments in which the subjects inhaled peppermint before and after an auditory task.


Use of human senses as sensors.

Sugawara Y, Sugimoto C, Minabe S, Iura Y, Okazaki M, Nakagawa N, Seto M, Maruyama S, Hirano M, Kitayama I - Sensors (Basel) (2009)

The observed skin temperature changes following inhalation of peppermint in relation to the auditory task. Redrawn from Sugawara et al. [14]. The numbers assigned to the graph represent the sensor spots on the left hand: 1, the tip of the thumb; 2, the tip of the first finger; 3, the tip of the second finger; 4, the tip of the third finger; 5, the tip of the fourth finger, and 6, the palm. The number of subjects was 20.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3297136&req=5

f7-sensors-09-03184: The observed skin temperature changes following inhalation of peppermint in relation to the auditory task. Redrawn from Sugawara et al. [14]. The numbers assigned to the graph represent the sensor spots on the left hand: 1, the tip of the thumb; 2, the tip of the first finger; 3, the tip of the second finger; 4, the tip of the third finger; 5, the tip of the fourth finger, and 6, the palm. The number of subjects was 20.
Mentions: On the basis of the verbal responses elicited by smelling presented stimuli, possible skin temperature changes while inhaling the fragrance of two essential oils (peppermint and spearmint) and one monoterpenoid (linalool) were concurrently monitored by a multi-channel skin thermometer as a function of the task assigned to the subjects in order to examine the relationship between subjective emotional perception of odor and its physiological effects [13,14]. Figure 7 depicts an example of skin temperature experiments in which the subjects inhaled peppermint before and after an auditory task.

Bottom Line: In the latter study, we employed a sensory test for evaluating changes in perception of a given aroma.The perception of fragrance was assessed by 13 contrasting pairs of adjectives as a function of the task assigned to participants.The obtained findings illustrate subtle nuances regarding how essential oils manifest their potency and how olfactory discrimination and responses occur in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Hiroshima 734-8558, Japan.

ABSTRACT
This paper is an overview of our recent findings obtained by the use of human senses as sensors, suggesting that human senses might be indispensable sensors, not only for practical uses but also for gaining a deeper understanding of humans. From this point of view, two kinds of studies, both based on semantic responses of participants, deserve emphasis. One study assessed the efficacy of the photocatalytic elimination of stains or bio-aerosols from an air environment using TiO(2) as well as the photocatalytic deodorizing efficacy of a TiO(2)-type deodorizer; the other study evaluated the changes in perception of a given aroma while inhaling the fragrance of essential oils. In the latter study, we employed a sensory test for evaluating changes in perception of a given aroma. Sensory tests were conducted twice, when participants were undergoing the Kraepelin mental performance test (mental arithmetic) or an auditory task (listening to environmental natural sounds), once before the task (pre-task) and once after the task (post-task). The perception of fragrance was assessed by 13 contrasting pairs of adjectives as a function of the task assigned to participants. The obtained findings illustrate subtle nuances regarding how essential oils manifest their potency and how olfactory discrimination and responses occur in humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus