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A procedure for high resolution satellite imagery quality assessment.

Crespi M, De Vendictis L - Sensors (Basel) (2009)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level.Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF).This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DITS, Area di Geodesia e Geomatica - Sapienza Università di Roma - via Eudossiana 18 - 00184 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

No MeSH data available.


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WorldView-1 Rome image.
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f23-sensors-09-03289: WorldView-1 Rome image.

Mentions: The WorldView-1 image (Figure 23) was acquired over Rome on 15th February 2008 with a mean cross-track angle of 6.5 degrees at a nominal resolution of 51 cm. Also in this case, two different products, Basic and Standard OrthoReady, derived from a different levels of processing, were available. The characteristics of the two level products are the same of QuickBird products. They are referred in the following as WV1_RM_Basic and WV1_RM_StdOr, according to the processing level.


A procedure for high resolution satellite imagery quality assessment.

Crespi M, De Vendictis L - Sensors (Basel) (2009)

WorldView-1 Rome image.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3297129&req=5

f23-sensors-09-03289: WorldView-1 Rome image.
Mentions: The WorldView-1 image (Figure 23) was acquired over Rome on 15th February 2008 with a mean cross-track angle of 6.5 degrees at a nominal resolution of 51 cm. Also in this case, two different products, Basic and Standard OrthoReady, derived from a different levels of processing, were available. The characteristics of the two level products are the same of QuickBird products. They are referred in the following as WV1_RM_Basic and WV1_RM_StdOr, according to the processing level.

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level.Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF).This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DITS, Area di Geodesia e Geomatica - Sapienza Università di Roma - via Eudossiana 18 - 00184 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus