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Risk factors of cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with low body mass index or without metabolic syndrome.

Song HY, Lee HK, Lee JS, Kim JY, Yim YH, Song TJ, Bae WK, Kim NH, Kim KA - Korean J. Intern. Med. (2012)

Bottom Line: Patients with high BMI (≥ 23 kg/m(2), n = 20) were also compared with those with lower BMI (n = 16).However, only smoking was statistically significant on multivariate analysis.Lower BMI was significantly associated with the presence of anti-HBs compared with high BMI, although this association was not statistically significant on multivariate analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Many patients are diagnosed with cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without metabolic syndrome (MS). We investigated the risk factors for cryptogenic HCC in patients with a low body mass index (BMI) or without MS.

Methods: Thirty-six patients were diagnosed with cryptogenic HCC over a 10-year period at a tertiary research hospital. Data including BMI score and risk factors for MS were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with fewer than two risk factors for MS (n = 16) were compared with those with two or more risk factors (n = 20). Patients with high BMI (≥ 23 kg/m(2), n = 20) were also compared with those with lower BMI (n = 16).

Results: Patients with fewer than two risk factors for MS were significantly more likely to smoke and be hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs)-positive vs. patients with two or more risk factors. However, only smoking was statistically significant on multivariate analysis. Peaks of BMI were observed in two regions. Lower BMI was significantly associated with the presence of anti-HBs compared with high BMI, although this association was not statistically significant on multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: Smoking is a potential risk factor for cryptogenic HCC in patients without MS. Remote hepatitis B virus infection may be a risk factor for cryptogenic HCC in patients without MS or with a low BMI.

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The distribution of body mass index in cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Peak body mass index incidence was observed in two regions (18.5-22.9 kg/m2 and 25-29.9 kg/m2).
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Figure 1: The distribution of body mass index in cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Peak body mass index incidence was observed in two regions (18.5-22.9 kg/m2 and 25-29.9 kg/m2).

Mentions: The peak incidence of BMI was observed in two regions (18.5-22.9 kg/m2 and 25-29.9 kg/m2) (Fig. 1). Twenty (55.6%) patients had a BMI of 23 kg/m2 or more, and 16 (44.4%) patients had a BMI < 23 kg/m2. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of glucose intolerance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, presence of another cancer, smoking habit, or CP score (Table 4). The number of anti-HBs-positive patients was significantly higher in the BMI < 23 kg/m2 group on univariate analysis (69.2% vs. 11.1%, respectively, p = 0.003) (Table 4). A binary logistic regression analysis that included age, hypertension, smoking habit, and anti-HBs found no statistically significant difference between groups in these variables, but smoking had an odds ratio of 6.42 for cryptogenic HCC in the low-BMI group, which suggests the possibility of a relationship (Table 5).


Risk factors of cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with low body mass index or without metabolic syndrome.

Song HY, Lee HK, Lee JS, Kim JY, Yim YH, Song TJ, Bae WK, Kim NH, Kim KA - Korean J. Intern. Med. (2012)

The distribution of body mass index in cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Peak body mass index incidence was observed in two regions (18.5-22.9 kg/m2 and 25-29.9 kg/m2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3295988&req=5

Figure 1: The distribution of body mass index in cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Peak body mass index incidence was observed in two regions (18.5-22.9 kg/m2 and 25-29.9 kg/m2).
Mentions: The peak incidence of BMI was observed in two regions (18.5-22.9 kg/m2 and 25-29.9 kg/m2) (Fig. 1). Twenty (55.6%) patients had a BMI of 23 kg/m2 or more, and 16 (44.4%) patients had a BMI < 23 kg/m2. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of glucose intolerance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, presence of another cancer, smoking habit, or CP score (Table 4). The number of anti-HBs-positive patients was significantly higher in the BMI < 23 kg/m2 group on univariate analysis (69.2% vs. 11.1%, respectively, p = 0.003) (Table 4). A binary logistic regression analysis that included age, hypertension, smoking habit, and anti-HBs found no statistically significant difference between groups in these variables, but smoking had an odds ratio of 6.42 for cryptogenic HCC in the low-BMI group, which suggests the possibility of a relationship (Table 5).

Bottom Line: Patients with high BMI (≥ 23 kg/m(2), n = 20) were also compared with those with lower BMI (n = 16).However, only smoking was statistically significant on multivariate analysis.Lower BMI was significantly associated with the presence of anti-HBs compared with high BMI, although this association was not statistically significant on multivariate analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Many patients are diagnosed with cryptogenic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without metabolic syndrome (MS). We investigated the risk factors for cryptogenic HCC in patients with a low body mass index (BMI) or without MS.

Methods: Thirty-six patients were diagnosed with cryptogenic HCC over a 10-year period at a tertiary research hospital. Data including BMI score and risk factors for MS were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with fewer than two risk factors for MS (n = 16) were compared with those with two or more risk factors (n = 20). Patients with high BMI (≥ 23 kg/m(2), n = 20) were also compared with those with lower BMI (n = 16).

Results: Patients with fewer than two risk factors for MS were significantly more likely to smoke and be hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs)-positive vs. patients with two or more risk factors. However, only smoking was statistically significant on multivariate analysis. Peaks of BMI were observed in two regions. Lower BMI was significantly associated with the presence of anti-HBs compared with high BMI, although this association was not statistically significant on multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: Smoking is a potential risk factor for cryptogenic HCC in patients without MS. Remote hepatitis B virus infection may be a risk factor for cryptogenic HCC in patients without MS or with a low BMI.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus