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Human cerebral malaria and Plasmodium falciparum genotypes in Malawi.

Milner DA, Vareta J, Valim C, Montgomery J, Daniels RF, Volkman SK, Neafsey DE, Park DJ, Schaffner SF, Mahesh NC, Barnes KG, Rosen DM, Lukens AK, Van Tyne D, Wiegand RC, Sabeti PC, Seydel KB, Glover SJ, Kamiza S, Molyneux ME, Taylor TE, Wirth DF - Malar. J. (2012)

Bottom Line: Cerebral malaria, a severe form of Plasmodium falciparum infection, is an important cause of mortality in sub-Saharan African children.Children with retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria had significantly less complex infections than those without retinopathy (OR = 3.7, 95% CI [1.51-9.10]).The complexity of infections significantly decreased over the malaria season in retinopathy-positive patients compared to retinopathy-negative patients.Limited diversity in the peripheral blood of cerebral malaria patients and correlation with tissues supports peripheral blood samples as appropriate for genome-wide association studies of parasite determinants of pathogenicity.

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Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Amory 3, Boston, MA 02115, USA. dmilner@partners.org

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Changes in the number of heterozygous calls per barcode in individual patients (Y-axis) as days of sample collection progressed (X-axis) in the malaria season of 2009 (January to June 2009). The crosses and dashed line (obtained from an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-positive patients with a decrease of approximately 5.0 heterozygous calls over six months. The diamonds and solid line (obtained in an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-negative patients with a less marked decrease of approximately 3.6 heterozygous calls over six months. The trend suggests that over the course of the data collection period (i.e. the malaria season in Malawi), the number of mixed infections decreases leading to more homogenous infections. Trends over time of patients with and without malaria retinopathy were statistically significantly different (P-value = 0.0007).
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Figure 4: Changes in the number of heterozygous calls per barcode in individual patients (Y-axis) as days of sample collection progressed (X-axis) in the malaria season of 2009 (January to June 2009). The crosses and dashed line (obtained from an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-positive patients with a decrease of approximately 5.0 heterozygous calls over six months. The diamonds and solid line (obtained in an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-negative patients with a less marked decrease of approximately 3.6 heterozygous calls over six months. The trend suggests that over the course of the data collection period (i.e. the malaria season in Malawi), the number of mixed infections decreases leading to more homogenous infections. Trends over time of patients with and without malaria retinopathy were statistically significantly different (P-value = 0.0007).

Mentions: The complexity of infections in both patient groups decreased over the six months during which data were collected (i.e. from start to end of the malaria season). Retinopathy-positive CM patients had consistently and significantly fewer heterozygous calls per patient (p-value = 0.00007, Figure 4) than retinopathy-negative patients, throughout the period of study.


Human cerebral malaria and Plasmodium falciparum genotypes in Malawi.

Milner DA, Vareta J, Valim C, Montgomery J, Daniels RF, Volkman SK, Neafsey DE, Park DJ, Schaffner SF, Mahesh NC, Barnes KG, Rosen DM, Lukens AK, Van Tyne D, Wiegand RC, Sabeti PC, Seydel KB, Glover SJ, Kamiza S, Molyneux ME, Taylor TE, Wirth DF - Malar. J. (2012)

Changes in the number of heterozygous calls per barcode in individual patients (Y-axis) as days of sample collection progressed (X-axis) in the malaria season of 2009 (January to June 2009). The crosses and dashed line (obtained from an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-positive patients with a decrease of approximately 5.0 heterozygous calls over six months. The diamonds and solid line (obtained in an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-negative patients with a less marked decrease of approximately 3.6 heterozygous calls over six months. The trend suggests that over the course of the data collection period (i.e. the malaria season in Malawi), the number of mixed infections decreases leading to more homogenous infections. Trends over time of patients with and without malaria retinopathy were statistically significantly different (P-value = 0.0007).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3295736&req=5

Figure 4: Changes in the number of heterozygous calls per barcode in individual patients (Y-axis) as days of sample collection progressed (X-axis) in the malaria season of 2009 (January to June 2009). The crosses and dashed line (obtained from an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-positive patients with a decrease of approximately 5.0 heterozygous calls over six months. The diamonds and solid line (obtained in an over-dispersed Poisson model) represent the malaria retinopathy-negative patients with a less marked decrease of approximately 3.6 heterozygous calls over six months. The trend suggests that over the course of the data collection period (i.e. the malaria season in Malawi), the number of mixed infections decreases leading to more homogenous infections. Trends over time of patients with and without malaria retinopathy were statistically significantly different (P-value = 0.0007).
Mentions: The complexity of infections in both patient groups decreased over the six months during which data were collected (i.e. from start to end of the malaria season). Retinopathy-positive CM patients had consistently and significantly fewer heterozygous calls per patient (p-value = 0.00007, Figure 4) than retinopathy-negative patients, throughout the period of study.

Bottom Line: Cerebral malaria, a severe form of Plasmodium falciparum infection, is an important cause of mortality in sub-Saharan African children.Children with retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria had significantly less complex infections than those without retinopathy (OR = 3.7, 95% CI [1.51-9.10]).The complexity of infections significantly decreased over the malaria season in retinopathy-positive patients compared to retinopathy-negative patients.Limited diversity in the peripheral blood of cerebral malaria patients and correlation with tissues supports peripheral blood samples as appropriate for genome-wide association studies of parasite determinants of pathogenicity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Amory 3, Boston, MA 02115, USA. dmilner@partners.org

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus