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Measuring the value of older people's production: a diary study.

Sahlen KG, Löfgren C, Brodin H, Dahlgren L, Lindholm L - BMC Health Serv Res (2012)

Bottom Line: An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity.In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production.In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. klasse.sahlen@epiph.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: The productive capacity of retired people is usually not valued. However, some retirees produce much more than we might expect. This diary-based study identifies the activities of older people, and suggests some value mechanisms. One question raised is whether it is possible to scale up this diary study into a larger representative study.

Methods: Diaries kept for one week were collected among 23 older people in the north of Sweden. The texts were analysed with a grounded theory approach; an interplay between ideas and empirical data.

Results: Some productive activities of older people must be valued as the opportunity cost of time or according to the market value, and others must be valued with the replacement cost. In order to make the choice between these methods, it is important to consider the societal entitlement. When there is no societal entitlement, the first or second method must be used; and when it exists, the third must be used.

Conclusions: An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity. In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production. In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life.

Show MeSH
Older people's production. Older people's production is either part of or not part of the entitlement. If it is part of the entitlement replacement cost approach should be used. If it not is part of the entitlement agreements on the market or opportunity cost should be used.
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Figure 1: Older people's production. Older people's production is either part of or not part of the entitlement. If it is part of the entitlement replacement cost approach should be used. If it not is part of the entitlement agreements on the market or opportunity cost should be used.

Mentions: The activities, as shown in Table 2 are merged according to their aim. If activities are a part of an entitlement, the valuing mechanism is included in the table. For entitlements, we suggest that the appropriate valuation method is social willingness to pay (SWP); that is, the willingness to pay displayed by public decision makers when allocating resources to healthcare and social care. In many cases, the available information consists of provision costs (the cost to provide the entitlement/replacement cost), and we assume that this cost equals SWP (this is of course a simplification, since SWP can be greater than the cost.) For private goods and services, we suggest a market value. For activities not included in the entitlement or possessing a market value, the opportunity cost of time seems a reasonable measure (Figure 1).


Measuring the value of older people's production: a diary study.

Sahlen KG, Löfgren C, Brodin H, Dahlgren L, Lindholm L - BMC Health Serv Res (2012)

Older people's production. Older people's production is either part of or not part of the entitlement. If it is part of the entitlement replacement cost approach should be used. If it not is part of the entitlement agreements on the market or opportunity cost should be used.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3295658&req=5

Figure 1: Older people's production. Older people's production is either part of or not part of the entitlement. If it is part of the entitlement replacement cost approach should be used. If it not is part of the entitlement agreements on the market or opportunity cost should be used.
Mentions: The activities, as shown in Table 2 are merged according to their aim. If activities are a part of an entitlement, the valuing mechanism is included in the table. For entitlements, we suggest that the appropriate valuation method is social willingness to pay (SWP); that is, the willingness to pay displayed by public decision makers when allocating resources to healthcare and social care. In many cases, the available information consists of provision costs (the cost to provide the entitlement/replacement cost), and we assume that this cost equals SWP (this is of course a simplification, since SWP can be greater than the cost.) For private goods and services, we suggest a market value. For activities not included in the entitlement or possessing a market value, the opportunity cost of time seems a reasonable measure (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity.In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production.In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. klasse.sahlen@epiph.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: The productive capacity of retired people is usually not valued. However, some retirees produce much more than we might expect. This diary-based study identifies the activities of older people, and suggests some value mechanisms. One question raised is whether it is possible to scale up this diary study into a larger representative study.

Methods: Diaries kept for one week were collected among 23 older people in the north of Sweden. The texts were analysed with a grounded theory approach; an interplay between ideas and empirical data.

Results: Some productive activities of older people must be valued as the opportunity cost of time or according to the market value, and others must be valued with the replacement cost. In order to make the choice between these methods, it is important to consider the societal entitlement. When there is no societal entitlement, the first or second method must be used; and when it exists, the third must be used.

Conclusions: An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity. In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production. In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life.

Show MeSH