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Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits.

Gonzalo N, Macaya C - Vasc Health Risk Manag (2012)

Bottom Line: This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis.Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology.The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Interventional Cardiology, Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. nieves_gonzalo@yahoo.es

ABSTRACT
Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of the ABSORB (A Clinical Evaluation of the Bioabsorbable Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System in the Treatment of Patients With de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions) Cohort A and B trials. Abbreviation: BVS, everolimus-eluting polylactide scaffold.
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f1-vhrm-8-125: Overview of the ABSORB (A Clinical Evaluation of the Bioabsorbable Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System in the Treatment of Patients With de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions) Cohort A and B trials. Abbreviation: BVS, everolimus-eluting polylactide scaffold.

Mentions: The available clinical results of the performance of the BVS come from the ABSORB trial (Figure 1). ABSORB Cohort A was a single-arm, prospective, open-label, first-in-humans study with safety and imaging endpoints. Between March 2006 and July 2006, Cohort A enrolled 30 patients with stable angina, unstable angina, or silent ischemia and a single de novo lesion in a native coronary artery of 3.0 mm. Patients were treated with the BVS 1.0 version, and there were two available stent lengths (12 mm and 18 mm). Clinical endpoints were cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), ischemia- driven target lesion revascularization (TLR), ischemia-driven major adverse cardiac event (MACE) (composite of cardiac death, MI, or ischemia-driven TLR), and stent thrombosis. We now have clinical results up to 4 years for Cohort A (29 of the 30 patients have follow-up). There was only one non-Q-wave MI related to the treatment of a nontarget stenosis in a patient with a BVS implanted 46 days earlier, resulting in an MACE rate of 3.4%.24 There were no cases of cardiac death or scaffold thrombosis up to 4 years. This MACE rate has remained unchanged from the 6-month follow-up.11,22,25


Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits.

Gonzalo N, Macaya C - Vasc Health Risk Manag (2012)

Overview of the ABSORB (A Clinical Evaluation of the Bioabsorbable Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System in the Treatment of Patients With de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions) Cohort A and B trials. Abbreviation: BVS, everolimus-eluting polylactide scaffold.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3295634&req=5

f1-vhrm-8-125: Overview of the ABSORB (A Clinical Evaluation of the Bioabsorbable Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System in the Treatment of Patients With de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions) Cohort A and B trials. Abbreviation: BVS, everolimus-eluting polylactide scaffold.
Mentions: The available clinical results of the performance of the BVS come from the ABSORB trial (Figure 1). ABSORB Cohort A was a single-arm, prospective, open-label, first-in-humans study with safety and imaging endpoints. Between March 2006 and July 2006, Cohort A enrolled 30 patients with stable angina, unstable angina, or silent ischemia and a single de novo lesion in a native coronary artery of 3.0 mm. Patients were treated with the BVS 1.0 version, and there were two available stent lengths (12 mm and 18 mm). Clinical endpoints were cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), ischemia- driven target lesion revascularization (TLR), ischemia-driven major adverse cardiac event (MACE) (composite of cardiac death, MI, or ischemia-driven TLR), and stent thrombosis. We now have clinical results up to 4 years for Cohort A (29 of the 30 patients have follow-up). There was only one non-Q-wave MI related to the treatment of a nontarget stenosis in a patient with a BVS implanted 46 days earlier, resulting in an MACE rate of 3.4%.24 There were no cases of cardiac death or scaffold thrombosis up to 4 years. This MACE rate has remained unchanged from the 6-month follow-up.11,22,25

Bottom Line: This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis.Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology.The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Interventional Cardiology, Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. nieves_gonzalo@yahoo.es

ABSTRACT
Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus