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Evaluation of tensile strength of tissue adhesives and sutures for clear corneal incisions using porcine and bovine eyes, with a novel standardized testing platform.

Kaja S, Goad DL, Ali F, Abraham A, Rebenitsch RL, Teymoorian S, Krishna R, Koulen P - Clin Ophthalmol (2012)

Bottom Line: Tissue adhesives for ophthalmologic applications were proposed almost 50 years ago, yet to date no adequate tissue glues have been identified that combine strong sealing properties with adequate safety and absence of postsurgical side effects.One of the obstacles to discovery and development of novel tissue adhesives has been the result of nonstandardized testing of potential tissue glues.Cyanoacrylate-based glues showed significantly enhanced sealing properties of clear corneal incisions compared with sutured wounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vision Research Center and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tissue adhesives for ophthalmologic applications were proposed almost 50 years ago, yet to date no adequate tissue glues have been identified that combine strong sealing properties with adequate safety and absence of postsurgical side effects. In recent years, cataract surgeries and Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty procedures have significantly increased the number of clear corneal incisions performed. One of the obstacles to discovery and development of novel tissue adhesives has been the result of nonstandardized testing of potential tissue glues.

Methods: We developed an instrument capable of controlling intraocular pressure in explanted porcine and bovine eyes in order to evaluate sealants, adhesives, and surgical closure methods used in ophthalmic surgery in a controlled, repeatable, and validated fashion. We herein developed and validated our instrument by testing the adhesive properties of cyanoacrylate glue in both porcine and bovine explant eyes.

Results: The instrument applied and maintained intraocular pressure through a broad range of physiological intraocular pressures. Cyanoacrylate-based glues showed significantly enhanced sealing properties of clear corneal incisions compared with sutured wounds.

Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of our instrument for reliable and standardized testing of tissue adhesive for ophthalmological surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Validation of the instrument. Digital readout and correct application of intraocular pressure in bovine (A) and porcine (B) eyes was validated by applanation tonometry. Intraocular pressures across a range of 10–60 mmHg were accurately applied, with less than 2% variation in tonometry readings.
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f2-opth-6-305: Validation of the instrument. Digital readout and correct application of intraocular pressure in bovine (A) and porcine (B) eyes was validated by applanation tonometry. Intraocular pressures across a range of 10–60 mmHg were accurately applied, with less than 2% variation in tonometry readings.

Mentions: In order to calibrate and validate our system, we applied three different intraocular pressures (10, 30, and 60 mmHg) to both porcine and bovine eyes. After equilibration for one minute at the chosen pressure using the manometer readout, intraocular pressure was measured using applanation tonometry. Across the range of physiological intraocular pressures, our instrument accurately applied the desired intraocular pressure, with less than 2% difference from the intraocular pressure measured using a Tono-Pen-XL in both bovine (n = 5; Figure 2A) and porcine (n = 5; Figure 2B) eyes.


Evaluation of tensile strength of tissue adhesives and sutures for clear corneal incisions using porcine and bovine eyes, with a novel standardized testing platform.

Kaja S, Goad DL, Ali F, Abraham A, Rebenitsch RL, Teymoorian S, Krishna R, Koulen P - Clin Ophthalmol (2012)

Validation of the instrument. Digital readout and correct application of intraocular pressure in bovine (A) and porcine (B) eyes was validated by applanation tonometry. Intraocular pressures across a range of 10–60 mmHg were accurately applied, with less than 2% variation in tonometry readings.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3295627&req=5

f2-opth-6-305: Validation of the instrument. Digital readout and correct application of intraocular pressure in bovine (A) and porcine (B) eyes was validated by applanation tonometry. Intraocular pressures across a range of 10–60 mmHg were accurately applied, with less than 2% variation in tonometry readings.
Mentions: In order to calibrate and validate our system, we applied three different intraocular pressures (10, 30, and 60 mmHg) to both porcine and bovine eyes. After equilibration for one minute at the chosen pressure using the manometer readout, intraocular pressure was measured using applanation tonometry. Across the range of physiological intraocular pressures, our instrument accurately applied the desired intraocular pressure, with less than 2% difference from the intraocular pressure measured using a Tono-Pen-XL in both bovine (n = 5; Figure 2A) and porcine (n = 5; Figure 2B) eyes.

Bottom Line: Tissue adhesives for ophthalmologic applications were proposed almost 50 years ago, yet to date no adequate tissue glues have been identified that combine strong sealing properties with adequate safety and absence of postsurgical side effects.One of the obstacles to discovery and development of novel tissue adhesives has been the result of nonstandardized testing of potential tissue glues.Cyanoacrylate-based glues showed significantly enhanced sealing properties of clear corneal incisions compared with sutured wounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vision Research Center and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tissue adhesives for ophthalmologic applications were proposed almost 50 years ago, yet to date no adequate tissue glues have been identified that combine strong sealing properties with adequate safety and absence of postsurgical side effects. In recent years, cataract surgeries and Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty procedures have significantly increased the number of clear corneal incisions performed. One of the obstacles to discovery and development of novel tissue adhesives has been the result of nonstandardized testing of potential tissue glues.

Methods: We developed an instrument capable of controlling intraocular pressure in explanted porcine and bovine eyes in order to evaluate sealants, adhesives, and surgical closure methods used in ophthalmic surgery in a controlled, repeatable, and validated fashion. We herein developed and validated our instrument by testing the adhesive properties of cyanoacrylate glue in both porcine and bovine explant eyes.

Results: The instrument applied and maintained intraocular pressure through a broad range of physiological intraocular pressures. Cyanoacrylate-based glues showed significantly enhanced sealing properties of clear corneal incisions compared with sutured wounds.

Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of our instrument for reliable and standardized testing of tissue adhesive for ophthalmological surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus