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Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal: a case report and review of the literature.

Eberhardt JM, Brown K, Lo S, Nagda S, Yong S - Case Rep Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Despite aggressive multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemotherapy and radiation, the disease progressed rapidly with dissemination occurring only three months after completion of treatment.Conclusion.Chemoradiotherapy is likely the most reasonable approach to extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal given its aggressiveness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Section of Colorectal Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 S First Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, USA.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma affecting the anal canal is a rare and poorly understood entity which can, in its early stages, masquerade as benign anorectal disease such as hemorrhoids. Methods. We report a case of this rare malignancy which initially presented with hematochezia and anal pain. We also review the literature with regard to previously described cases and management strategies including the role of surgery. Results. Despite aggressive multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemotherapy and radiation, the disease progressed rapidly with dissemination occurring only three months after completion of treatment. Because of the aggressive nature of this tumor, the treatment options for this almost universally fatal malignancy are often palliative in nature. Conclusion. Chemoradiotherapy is likely the most reasonable approach to extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal given its aggressiveness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PET scan showing uptake in right inguinal region (a) and anal canal (b).
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fig2: PET scan showing uptake in right inguinal region (a) and anal canal (b).

Mentions: Staging CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, and MRI of the brain did not reveal distant metastatic disease nor a primary lung tumor. 18F-FDG PET scan demonstrated uptake in the anal canal and right inguinal region (Figure 2). Routine laboratory parameters were normal and serology was negative for HIV infection. She was treated with chemoradiotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide concurrent with radiation therapy during cycles 2 and 3. She received a total dose of 54 Gy in 27 fractions to the gross anal tumor and the right inguinal region and 47 Gy in 27 fractions to the pelvis. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used.


Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal: a case report and review of the literature.

Eberhardt JM, Brown K, Lo S, Nagda S, Yong S - Case Rep Med (2012)

PET scan showing uptake in right inguinal region (a) and anal canal (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3295533&req=5

fig2: PET scan showing uptake in right inguinal region (a) and anal canal (b).
Mentions: Staging CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, and MRI of the brain did not reveal distant metastatic disease nor a primary lung tumor. 18F-FDG PET scan demonstrated uptake in the anal canal and right inguinal region (Figure 2). Routine laboratory parameters were normal and serology was negative for HIV infection. She was treated with chemoradiotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide concurrent with radiation therapy during cycles 2 and 3. She received a total dose of 54 Gy in 27 fractions to the gross anal tumor and the right inguinal region and 47 Gy in 27 fractions to the pelvis. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used.

Bottom Line: Despite aggressive multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemotherapy and radiation, the disease progressed rapidly with dissemination occurring only three months after completion of treatment.Conclusion.Chemoradiotherapy is likely the most reasonable approach to extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal given its aggressiveness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Section of Colorectal Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 S First Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, USA.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma affecting the anal canal is a rare and poorly understood entity which can, in its early stages, masquerade as benign anorectal disease such as hemorrhoids. Methods. We report a case of this rare malignancy which initially presented with hematochezia and anal pain. We also review the literature with regard to previously described cases and management strategies including the role of surgery. Results. Despite aggressive multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemotherapy and radiation, the disease progressed rapidly with dissemination occurring only three months after completion of treatment. Because of the aggressive nature of this tumor, the treatment options for this almost universally fatal malignancy are often palliative in nature. Conclusion. Chemoradiotherapy is likely the most reasonable approach to extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal given its aggressiveness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus