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Estimated short-term effects of coarse particles on daily mortality in Stockholm, Sweden.

Meister K, Johansson C, Forsberg B - Environ. Health Perspect. (2011)

Bottom Line: The association with PM(2.5-10) was stronger for November through May, when road dust is most important (1.69% increase; 95% CI: 0.21%, 3.17%), compared with the rest of the year (1.31% increase; 95% CI: -2.08%, 4.70%), although the difference was not statistically significant.When adjusted for other pollutants, particularly PM(2.5), the effect estimates per 10 μg/m³ for PM(2.5-10) decreased slightly but were still higher than corresponding effect estimates for PM(2.5).Regulation of PM(2.5-10) should be considered, along with actions to specifically reduce PM(2.5-10) emissions, especially road dust suspension, in cities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. kadri.meister@envmed.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Although serious health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM₁₀) and ≤ 2.5 μm (PM(2.5); fine fraction) are documented in many studies, the effects of coarse PM (PM(2.5-10)) are still under debate.

Objective: In this study, we estimated the effects of short-term exposure of PM(2.5-10) on daily mortality in Stockholm, Sweden.

Method: We collected data on daily mortality for the years 2000 through 2008. Concentrations of PM₁₀, PM(2.5), ozone, and carbon monoxide were measured simultaneously in central Stockholm. We used additive Poisson regression models to examine the association between daily mortality and PM2.5-10 on the day of death and the day before. Effect estimates were adjusted for other pollutants (two-pollutant models) during different seasons.

Results: We estimated a 1.68% increase [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.20%, 3.15%] in daily mortality per 10-μg/m³ increase in PM(2.5-10) (single-pollutant model). The association with PM(2.5-10) was stronger for November through May, when road dust is most important (1.69% increase; 95% CI: 0.21%, 3.17%), compared with the rest of the year (1.31% increase; 95% CI: -2.08%, 4.70%), although the difference was not statistically significant. When adjusted for other pollutants, particularly PM(2.5), the effect estimates per 10 μg/m³ for PM(2.5-10) decreased slightly but were still higher than corresponding effect estimates for PM(2.5).

Conclusions: Our analysis shows an increase in daily mortality associated with elevated urban background levels of PM(2.5-10). Regulation of PM(2.5-10) should be considered, along with actions to specifically reduce PM(2.5-10) emissions, especially road dust suspension, in cities.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The smooth function of the relationship between PM2.5–10 (lag01) and daily mortality from the single-pollutant model, adjusted for time trend, day of the week, public holidays, temperature, humidity, and influenza outbreaks. The shaded area represents 95% CI.
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f2: The smooth function of the relationship between PM2.5–10 (lag01) and daily mortality from the single-pollutant model, adjusted for time trend, day of the week, public holidays, temperature, humidity, and influenza outbreaks. The shaded area represents 95% CI.

Mentions: The smooth function of PM2.5–10 (lag01)from the single-pollutant model, adjusted for the covariates listed above (Figure 2), suggests that the more precisely estimated part of the curve does not deviate from linearity.


Estimated short-term effects of coarse particles on daily mortality in Stockholm, Sweden.

Meister K, Johansson C, Forsberg B - Environ. Health Perspect. (2011)

The smooth function of the relationship between PM2.5–10 (lag01) and daily mortality from the single-pollutant model, adjusted for time trend, day of the week, public holidays, temperature, humidity, and influenza outbreaks. The shaded area represents 95% CI.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3295353&req=5

f2: The smooth function of the relationship between PM2.5–10 (lag01) and daily mortality from the single-pollutant model, adjusted for time trend, day of the week, public holidays, temperature, humidity, and influenza outbreaks. The shaded area represents 95% CI.
Mentions: The smooth function of PM2.5–10 (lag01)from the single-pollutant model, adjusted for the covariates listed above (Figure 2), suggests that the more precisely estimated part of the curve does not deviate from linearity.

Bottom Line: The association with PM(2.5-10) was stronger for November through May, when road dust is most important (1.69% increase; 95% CI: 0.21%, 3.17%), compared with the rest of the year (1.31% increase; 95% CI: -2.08%, 4.70%), although the difference was not statistically significant.When adjusted for other pollutants, particularly PM(2.5), the effect estimates per 10 μg/m³ for PM(2.5-10) decreased slightly but were still higher than corresponding effect estimates for PM(2.5).Regulation of PM(2.5-10) should be considered, along with actions to specifically reduce PM(2.5-10) emissions, especially road dust suspension, in cities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. kadri.meister@envmed.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Although serious health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM₁₀) and ≤ 2.5 μm (PM(2.5); fine fraction) are documented in many studies, the effects of coarse PM (PM(2.5-10)) are still under debate.

Objective: In this study, we estimated the effects of short-term exposure of PM(2.5-10) on daily mortality in Stockholm, Sweden.

Method: We collected data on daily mortality for the years 2000 through 2008. Concentrations of PM₁₀, PM(2.5), ozone, and carbon monoxide were measured simultaneously in central Stockholm. We used additive Poisson regression models to examine the association between daily mortality and PM2.5-10 on the day of death and the day before. Effect estimates were adjusted for other pollutants (two-pollutant models) during different seasons.

Results: We estimated a 1.68% increase [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.20%, 3.15%] in daily mortality per 10-μg/m³ increase in PM(2.5-10) (single-pollutant model). The association with PM(2.5-10) was stronger for November through May, when road dust is most important (1.69% increase; 95% CI: 0.21%, 3.17%), compared with the rest of the year (1.31% increase; 95% CI: -2.08%, 4.70%), although the difference was not statistically significant. When adjusted for other pollutants, particularly PM(2.5), the effect estimates per 10 μg/m³ for PM(2.5-10) decreased slightly but were still higher than corresponding effect estimates for PM(2.5).

Conclusions: Our analysis shows an increase in daily mortality associated with elevated urban background levels of PM(2.5-10). Regulation of PM(2.5-10) should be considered, along with actions to specifically reduce PM(2.5-10) emissions, especially road dust suspension, in cities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus