Limits...
Mobile messaging as surveillance tool during pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Mexico.

Lajous M, Danon L, López-Ridaura R, Astley CM, Miller JC, Dowell SF, O'Hagan JJ, Goldstein E, Lipsitch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 highlighted challenges faced by disease surveillance systems... Epidemic curves for disease onset for confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from SINAVE and daily proportion of severe cases from the cell phone survey are shown in the Figure... The proportion of severe cases increased throughout the month beginning on April 1 (36.4%) and peaking on April 26 (57.9%)... Two distinct decreases in severity of disease coincided with Semana Santa school vacation and school closures on April 24... These decreases are consistent with the decrease in the SINAVE epidemic curve... The low response rate (5.8%) made it likely that respondents were not representative of the total population... Therefore, we did not make estimates of disease incidence... However, the peak on April 1 may reflect disease at the end of March, and the decrease in daily proportion of severe cases may indicate lower incidence of ILI after school closures... In 2 telephone surveys in New York City outside the influenza season (March and October–November 2003), a total of 20.8% and 19.6% of respondents, respectively, reported ILI within the past month, which were more than the rate of 12% during the peak of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in New York... Nevertheless, a lower number of cases by the end of the month indicates that more accurate recall for recent dates may not be a serious problem... Generalizability of these results is of concern... To limit recall errors and increase response rate, repeated surveys at short intervals and specific strategies to improve response rate should be considered... Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 mobile phone unstructured supplementary service data survey questions, Characteristics of respondents and ILI cases from a mobile messaging technology survey and Reported number of nonsevere and severe cases of influenza-like illness.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of severe cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Mexico, April 2009, from unstructured supplementary service data survey and confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica. Suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 are ILI cases for which no laboratory confirmation was possible. The daily proportion of reported severe cases and daily counts of confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were smoothed by using a 5-day moving average.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3294993&req=5

Figure 1: Proportion of severe cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Mexico, April 2009, from unstructured supplementary service data survey and confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica. Suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 are ILI cases for which no laboratory confirmation was possible. The daily proportion of reported severe cases and daily counts of confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were smoothed by using a 5-day moving average.

Mentions: Epidemic curves for disease onset for confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from SINAVE and daily proportion of severe cases from the cell phone survey are shown in the Figure. Daily counts of ILI were clustered around multiples of 5, and no distinct pattern was observed (Technical Appendix Figure 2). Use of the daily proportion of severe cases may partially correct for clustering and artifactual peaks by standardizing by total number of cases. The proportion of severe cases increased throughout the month beginning on April 1 (36.4%) and peaking on April 26 (57.9%). Two distinct decreases in severity of disease coincided with Semana Santa school vacation and school closures on April 24. These decreases are consistent with the decrease in the SINAVE epidemic curve.


Mobile messaging as surveillance tool during pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Mexico.

Lajous M, Danon L, López-Ridaura R, Astley CM, Miller JC, Dowell SF, O'Hagan JJ, Goldstein E, Lipsitch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Proportion of severe cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Mexico, April 2009, from unstructured supplementary service data survey and confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica. Suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 are ILI cases for which no laboratory confirmation was possible. The daily proportion of reported severe cases and daily counts of confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were smoothed by using a 5-day moving average.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3294993&req=5

Figure 1: Proportion of severe cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Mexico, April 2009, from unstructured supplementary service data survey and confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica. Suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 are ILI cases for which no laboratory confirmation was possible. The daily proportion of reported severe cases and daily counts of confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were smoothed by using a 5-day moving average.
Mentions: Epidemic curves for disease onset for confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from SINAVE and daily proportion of severe cases from the cell phone survey are shown in the Figure. Daily counts of ILI were clustered around multiples of 5, and no distinct pattern was observed (Technical Appendix Figure 2). Use of the daily proportion of severe cases may partially correct for clustering and artifactual peaks by standardizing by total number of cases. The proportion of severe cases increased throughout the month beginning on April 1 (36.4%) and peaking on April 26 (57.9%). Two distinct decreases in severity of disease coincided with Semana Santa school vacation and school closures on April 24. These decreases are consistent with the decrease in the SINAVE epidemic curve.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 highlighted challenges faced by disease surveillance systems... Epidemic curves for disease onset for confirmed and suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 from SINAVE and daily proportion of severe cases from the cell phone survey are shown in the Figure... The proportion of severe cases increased throughout the month beginning on April 1 (36.4%) and peaking on April 26 (57.9%)... Two distinct decreases in severity of disease coincided with Semana Santa school vacation and school closures on April 24... These decreases are consistent with the decrease in the SINAVE epidemic curve... The low response rate (5.8%) made it likely that respondents were not representative of the total population... Therefore, we did not make estimates of disease incidence... However, the peak on April 1 may reflect disease at the end of March, and the decrease in daily proportion of severe cases may indicate lower incidence of ILI after school closures... In 2 telephone surveys in New York City outside the influenza season (March and October–November 2003), a total of 20.8% and 19.6% of respondents, respectively, reported ILI within the past month, which were more than the rate of 12% during the peak of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in New York... Nevertheless, a lower number of cases by the end of the month indicates that more accurate recall for recent dates may not be a serious problem... Generalizability of these results is of concern... To limit recall errors and increase response rate, repeated surveys at short intervals and specific strategies to improve response rate should be considered... Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 mobile phone unstructured supplementary service data survey questions, Characteristics of respondents and ILI cases from a mobile messaging technology survey and Reported number of nonsevere and severe cases of influenza-like illness.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus