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Absence of association between N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator status and colorectal cancer susceptibility: based on evidence from 40 studies.

Zhang Lq, Zhou Jn, Wang J, Liang Gd, Li Jy, Zhu Yd, Su Yt - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: However, the results remain conflicting.No significantly elevated CRC risk in individuals with NAT2 slow acetylators compared with fast acetylators was found when all studies pooled (OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.87-1.04, I(2) = 52.6%).While three studies contributed to the source of heterogeneity were removed, there was still result observed (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.90-1.03, P = 0.17 for heterogeneity, I(2) = 17.8%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Colorectal and Anal Surgery Center, The Affiliated Jiangsu Cancer Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: N-Acetyltransferase (NAT) 2 is an important enzyme involved in the metabolism of different xenobiotics, including potential carcinogens, whose phenotypes were reported to be related to individual susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the results remain conflicting. To assess the relationship between NAT2 phenotypes and CRC risk, we performed this meta-analysis.

Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all case-control or cohort studies of NAT2 acetylator status on the susceptibility of CRC by searching of PubMed and EMBASE, up to May 20, 2011. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association.

Results: A total of over 40,000 subjects from 40 published literatures were identified by searching the databases. No significantly elevated CRC risk in individuals with NAT2 slow acetylators compared with fast acetylators was found when all studies pooled (OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.87-1.04, I(2) = 52.6%). While three studies contributed to the source of heterogeneity were removed, there was still result observed (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.90-1.03, P = 0.17 for heterogeneity, I(2) = 17.8%). In addition, we failed to detect any associations in the stratified analyses by race, sex, source of controls, smoking status, genotyping methods or tumor localization. No publication bias was observed in this study.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that the NAT2 phenotypes may not be associated with colorectal cancer development.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Funnel plots of Begg's and Egger's were used to detect publication bias on overall estimate.No significant publication bias was found. Each point represents an individual study for the indicated association.
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pone-0032425-g003: Funnel plots of Begg's and Egger's were used to detect publication bias on overall estimate.No significant publication bias was found. Each point represents an individual study for the indicated association.

Mentions: As shown in Figure 3, the shape of the funnel plot seemed symmetrical, suggesting the absence of publication bias. Then, the Egger's test was adopted to provide statistical evidence of funnel plot symmetry. The result still did not suggest any evidence of publication bias (Pā€Š=ā€Š0.89).


Absence of association between N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator status and colorectal cancer susceptibility: based on evidence from 40 studies.

Zhang Lq, Zhou Jn, Wang J, Liang Gd, Li Jy, Zhu Yd, Su Yt - PLoS ONE (2012)

Funnel plots of Begg's and Egger's were used to detect publication bias on overall estimate.No significant publication bias was found. Each point represents an individual study for the indicated association.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3293792&req=5

pone-0032425-g003: Funnel plots of Begg's and Egger's were used to detect publication bias on overall estimate.No significant publication bias was found. Each point represents an individual study for the indicated association.
Mentions: As shown in Figure 3, the shape of the funnel plot seemed symmetrical, suggesting the absence of publication bias. Then, the Egger's test was adopted to provide statistical evidence of funnel plot symmetry. The result still did not suggest any evidence of publication bias (Pā€Š=ā€Š0.89).

Bottom Line: However, the results remain conflicting.No significantly elevated CRC risk in individuals with NAT2 slow acetylators compared with fast acetylators was found when all studies pooled (OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.87-1.04, I(2) = 52.6%).While three studies contributed to the source of heterogeneity were removed, there was still result observed (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.90-1.03, P = 0.17 for heterogeneity, I(2) = 17.8%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Colorectal and Anal Surgery Center, The Affiliated Jiangsu Cancer Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: N-Acetyltransferase (NAT) 2 is an important enzyme involved in the metabolism of different xenobiotics, including potential carcinogens, whose phenotypes were reported to be related to individual susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the results remain conflicting. To assess the relationship between NAT2 phenotypes and CRC risk, we performed this meta-analysis.

Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all case-control or cohort studies of NAT2 acetylator status on the susceptibility of CRC by searching of PubMed and EMBASE, up to May 20, 2011. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association.

Results: A total of over 40,000 subjects from 40 published literatures were identified by searching the databases. No significantly elevated CRC risk in individuals with NAT2 slow acetylators compared with fast acetylators was found when all studies pooled (OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.87-1.04, I(2) = 52.6%). While three studies contributed to the source of heterogeneity were removed, there was still result observed (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.90-1.03, P = 0.17 for heterogeneity, I(2) = 17.8%). In addition, we failed to detect any associations in the stratified analyses by race, sex, source of controls, smoking status, genotyping methods or tumor localization. No publication bias was observed in this study.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that the NAT2 phenotypes may not be associated with colorectal cancer development.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus