Limits...
Human Plasmodium knowlesi infection in Ranong province, southwestern border of Thailand.

Sermwittayawong N, Singh B, Nishibuchi M, Sawangjaroen N, Vuddhakul V - Malar. J. (2012)

Bottom Line: Nucleotide sequences of the csp gene derived from these two patients were identical and phylogenetically indistinguishable from other P. knowlesi sequences derived from monkeys and humans.Both patients worked in Koh Song, located in the Kawthoung district of Myanmar, which borders Thailand.This study indicates that transmission of P. knowlesi is occurring in the Ranong province of Thailand or the Kawthoung district of Myanmar.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand. natthawan.k@psu.ac.th

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of Ranong province close to Koh Song and Koh Payam.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3293766&req=5

Figure 1: Map of Ranong province close to Koh Song and Koh Payam.

Mentions: In Thailand, the first case of a human P. knowlesi infection was acquired in Prachuap Khiri Khan, a southern Thai province, and reported in 2004 [9]. No other humans infected with this species of Plasmodium were reported in Thailand until 2009, when 10 cases from Tak, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Chantaburi, Yala and Narathiwat provinces were described [10]. These areas located near borders of Myanmar, Cambodia, and Malaysia (Figure 1). Recently, a total of 23 P. knowlesi infected patients have been reported in these border areas [11]. Retrospective study of blood samples obtained from malaria patients living in Tak province in 1996 indicated that P. knowlesi has circulated among humans in Thailand more than a decade [11]. Ranong is one of Thailand's southern provinces located on the coast of the Andaman Sea. The province shares a border with Myanmar (Figure 1). There is extensive trading and labour flow between Myanmese and the Thais, with Myanmese frequently crossing the border into Thailand and some seeking health treatment in Ranong. In order to assess whether there were additional cases of human knowlesi malaria, particularly among the Myanmese, blood samples collected from malaria patients attending the malaria clinic at the Vector Borne Disease Control Center at Ranong were investigated.


Human Plasmodium knowlesi infection in Ranong province, southwestern border of Thailand.

Sermwittayawong N, Singh B, Nishibuchi M, Sawangjaroen N, Vuddhakul V - Malar. J. (2012)

Map of Ranong province close to Koh Song and Koh Payam.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3293766&req=5

Figure 1: Map of Ranong province close to Koh Song and Koh Payam.
Mentions: In Thailand, the first case of a human P. knowlesi infection was acquired in Prachuap Khiri Khan, a southern Thai province, and reported in 2004 [9]. No other humans infected with this species of Plasmodium were reported in Thailand until 2009, when 10 cases from Tak, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Chantaburi, Yala and Narathiwat provinces were described [10]. These areas located near borders of Myanmar, Cambodia, and Malaysia (Figure 1). Recently, a total of 23 P. knowlesi infected patients have been reported in these border areas [11]. Retrospective study of blood samples obtained from malaria patients living in Tak province in 1996 indicated that P. knowlesi has circulated among humans in Thailand more than a decade [11]. Ranong is one of Thailand's southern provinces located on the coast of the Andaman Sea. The province shares a border with Myanmar (Figure 1). There is extensive trading and labour flow between Myanmese and the Thais, with Myanmese frequently crossing the border into Thailand and some seeking health treatment in Ranong. In order to assess whether there were additional cases of human knowlesi malaria, particularly among the Myanmese, blood samples collected from malaria patients attending the malaria clinic at the Vector Borne Disease Control Center at Ranong were investigated.

Bottom Line: Nucleotide sequences of the csp gene derived from these two patients were identical and phylogenetically indistinguishable from other P. knowlesi sequences derived from monkeys and humans.Both patients worked in Koh Song, located in the Kawthoung district of Myanmar, which borders Thailand.This study indicates that transmission of P. knowlesi is occurring in the Ranong province of Thailand or the Kawthoung district of Myanmar.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand. natthawan.k@psu.ac.th

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus