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A quarter of a century succession of epigaeic beetle assemblages in remnant habitats in an urbanized matrix (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

Gandhi KJ, Epstein ME, Koehle JJ, Purrington FF - Zookeys (2011)

Bottom Line: These remnant habitats were increasingly colonized by exotic carabid species as Carabus granulatus granulatus Linneaus, Clivina fossor (Linneaus) and Platynus melanarius (Illiger), that were trapped for the first time in 2005.Species composition of epigaeic beetles was quite distinct in 2005 from 1980 with 39 species reported for the first time in 2005, indicating a high turnover of assemblages.As our sampled areas are among some of the last remnants of the original oak savanna habitats in central Minnesota, we hypothesize that conservation of these sites may be critical to maintaining epigaeic beetle assemblages under increased urbanization pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, 30602, USA.

ABSTRACT
We studied the long-term (23-24 years) species turnover and succession of epigaeic beetle assemblages (Coleoptera: Carabidae, incl. Cicindelinae) in three remnant habitats [cottonwood (Populus spp.) and oak (Quercus spp.) stands, and old fields] that are embedded within highly urbanized areas in central Minnesota. A total of 9,710 beetle individuals belonging to 98 species were caught in three sampling years: 1980, 1981 and 2005 in pitfall traps in identical locations within each habitat. Results indicate that there were 2-3 times greater trap catches in 2005 than in 1980 (cottonwood and oak stands, and old fields) and 1.4-1.7 times greater species diversity of beetles in 2005 than in the 1980-1981 suggesting increased habitat association by beetles over time. Although there were no significant differences in catches between 2005 and 1981 (only cottonwood stands and old fields), there was a trend where more beetles were caught in 2005. At the species-level, 10 times more of an open-habitat carabid species, Cyclotrachelus sodalis sodalis LeConte, was caught in 2005 than in 1980. However, trap catches of five other abundant carabid species [Pterostichus novus Straneo, Platynus decentis (Say), Platynus mutus (Say), Calathus gregarius (Say), and Poecilus lucublandus lucublandus (Say)] did not change indicating population stability of some beetle species. These remnant habitats were increasingly colonized by exotic carabid species as Carabus granulatus granulatus Linneaus, Clivina fossor (Linneaus) and Platynus melanarius (Illiger), that were trapped for the first time in 2005. Species composition of epigaeic beetles was quite distinct in 2005 from 1980 with 39 species reported for the first time in 2005, indicating a high turnover of assemblages. At the habitat-level, greatest species diversity was in cottonwood stands and lowest was in old fields, and all habitat types in 2005 diverged from those in 1980s, but not cottonwood stands in 1981. As our sampled areas are among some of the last remnants of the original oak savanna habitats in central Minnesota, we hypothesize that conservation of these sites may be critical to maintaining epigaeic beetle assemblages under increased urbanization pressure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dendrogram for the similarity/dissimilarity in standardized per trap catches of epigaeic beetle assemblages in sampling years 1980 and 2005 (A) and 1981 and 2005 (B) in cottonwood and oak stands, and old fields.
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Figure 4: Dendrogram for the similarity/dissimilarity in standardized per trap catches of epigaeic beetle assemblages in sampling years 1980 and 2005 (A) and 1981 and 2005 (B) in cottonwood and oak stands, and old fields.

Mentions: Dendrogram created using cluster analysis from standardized beetle catch data per trap for 1980 and 2005 revealed that the carabid beetle assemblages had diverged over time (Fig. 4A). Carabid beetle assemblages within all habitat-types in 1980 were quite dissimilar to that of 2005 (Fig. 4A). The old fields and oak stands were more similar to each other than to cottonwood stands in 2005. In contrast, dendrogram for years 1981 and 2005 revealed that the cottonwood stands had remained largely unchanged, however species composition of old fields in 1981 and 2005 were quite dissimilar to each other (Fig. 4B).


A quarter of a century succession of epigaeic beetle assemblages in remnant habitats in an urbanized matrix (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

Gandhi KJ, Epstein ME, Koehle JJ, Purrington FF - Zookeys (2011)

Dendrogram for the similarity/dissimilarity in standardized per trap catches of epigaeic beetle assemblages in sampling years 1980 and 2005 (A) and 1981 and 2005 (B) in cottonwood and oak stands, and old fields.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3286239&req=5

Figure 4: Dendrogram for the similarity/dissimilarity in standardized per trap catches of epigaeic beetle assemblages in sampling years 1980 and 2005 (A) and 1981 and 2005 (B) in cottonwood and oak stands, and old fields.
Mentions: Dendrogram created using cluster analysis from standardized beetle catch data per trap for 1980 and 2005 revealed that the carabid beetle assemblages had diverged over time (Fig. 4A). Carabid beetle assemblages within all habitat-types in 1980 were quite dissimilar to that of 2005 (Fig. 4A). The old fields and oak stands were more similar to each other than to cottonwood stands in 2005. In contrast, dendrogram for years 1981 and 2005 revealed that the cottonwood stands had remained largely unchanged, however species composition of old fields in 1981 and 2005 were quite dissimilar to each other (Fig. 4B).

Bottom Line: These remnant habitats were increasingly colonized by exotic carabid species as Carabus granulatus granulatus Linneaus, Clivina fossor (Linneaus) and Platynus melanarius (Illiger), that were trapped for the first time in 2005.Species composition of epigaeic beetles was quite distinct in 2005 from 1980 with 39 species reported for the first time in 2005, indicating a high turnover of assemblages.As our sampled areas are among some of the last remnants of the original oak savanna habitats in central Minnesota, we hypothesize that conservation of these sites may be critical to maintaining epigaeic beetle assemblages under increased urbanization pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, 30602, USA.

ABSTRACT
We studied the long-term (23-24 years) species turnover and succession of epigaeic beetle assemblages (Coleoptera: Carabidae, incl. Cicindelinae) in three remnant habitats [cottonwood (Populus spp.) and oak (Quercus spp.) stands, and old fields] that are embedded within highly urbanized areas in central Minnesota. A total of 9,710 beetle individuals belonging to 98 species were caught in three sampling years: 1980, 1981 and 2005 in pitfall traps in identical locations within each habitat. Results indicate that there were 2-3 times greater trap catches in 2005 than in 1980 (cottonwood and oak stands, and old fields) and 1.4-1.7 times greater species diversity of beetles in 2005 than in the 1980-1981 suggesting increased habitat association by beetles over time. Although there were no significant differences in catches between 2005 and 1981 (only cottonwood stands and old fields), there was a trend where more beetles were caught in 2005. At the species-level, 10 times more of an open-habitat carabid species, Cyclotrachelus sodalis sodalis LeConte, was caught in 2005 than in 1980. However, trap catches of five other abundant carabid species [Pterostichus novus Straneo, Platynus decentis (Say), Platynus mutus (Say), Calathus gregarius (Say), and Poecilus lucublandus lucublandus (Say)] did not change indicating population stability of some beetle species. These remnant habitats were increasingly colonized by exotic carabid species as Carabus granulatus granulatus Linneaus, Clivina fossor (Linneaus) and Platynus melanarius (Illiger), that were trapped for the first time in 2005. Species composition of epigaeic beetles was quite distinct in 2005 from 1980 with 39 species reported for the first time in 2005, indicating a high turnover of assemblages. At the habitat-level, greatest species diversity was in cottonwood stands and lowest was in old fields, and all habitat types in 2005 diverged from those in 1980s, but not cottonwood stands in 1981. As our sampled areas are among some of the last remnants of the original oak savanna habitats in central Minnesota, we hypothesize that conservation of these sites may be critical to maintaining epigaeic beetle assemblages under increased urbanization pressure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus