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Cerebral venous thrombosis: diagnosis dilemma.

Chiewvit P, Piyapittayanan S, Poungvarin N - Neurol Int (2011)

Bottom Line: This disorder is potentially lethal but treatable, oftenly it was overlooked in both clinical and radiologic in routine practice.Whenever, clinical suspected, prompt investigation by noninvasive imaging Magnetic resonance (MR) or advanced modilities such as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), MRV (MR Venography) will helpful in prompt diagnosis and treatment.By using of effective treatment will improve the prognosis of the patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Radiology.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral venous thrombosis is increasing common disease in daily practice with sharing clinical nonspecific symptoms. This disorder is potentially lethal but treatable, oftenly it was overlooked in both clinical and radiologic in routine practice. Whenever, clinical suspected, prompt investigation by noninvasive imaging Magnetic resonance (MR) or advanced modilities such as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), MRV (MR Venography) will helpful in prompt diagnosis and treatment. These imaging modalities may reveal either direct sign (visualization of intraluminal clot) and indirect signs (paranchymatous change, intracranial hemorrhage). By using of effective treatment will improve the prognosis of the patient. This review summarizes insights into etiology, incidence, imaging modalities and current of the treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Axial computed-tomography scan demonstrates A,B) intraluminal hyperdensity of clot at right sided of superior sagittal sinus wall, cortical veins of right frontal regions (cord sign, arrow). CT venography showed C,D) no contrast filled in thrombosed cortical vein in right frontal region. The dural venous sinus is well opacity by contrast medium.
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Figure 7: Axial computed-tomography scan demonstrates A,B) intraluminal hyperdensity of clot at right sided of superior sagittal sinus wall, cortical veins of right frontal regions (cord sign, arrow). CT venography showed C,D) no contrast filled in thrombosed cortical vein in right frontal region. The dural venous sinus is well opacity by contrast medium.

Mentions: CTV (Figure 7A–D) has proved to be a reliable method to investigate the structure of the cerebral veins, with a reported sensitivity of 95% with multiplanar reformatted (MPR) images when compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the standard of reference.4,9 CTV is a promising for better delineation of venous anatomy, and equally sensitive for demonstrating thrombosis.3 However, common variants of the sinovenous system should not be mistaken for sinus thrombosis.9 CT venography is standardized and involves the following steps:


Cerebral venous thrombosis: diagnosis dilemma.

Chiewvit P, Piyapittayanan S, Poungvarin N - Neurol Int (2011)

Axial computed-tomography scan demonstrates A,B) intraluminal hyperdensity of clot at right sided of superior sagittal sinus wall, cortical veins of right frontal regions (cord sign, arrow). CT venography showed C,D) no contrast filled in thrombosed cortical vein in right frontal region. The dural venous sinus is well opacity by contrast medium.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3286153&req=5

Figure 7: Axial computed-tomography scan demonstrates A,B) intraluminal hyperdensity of clot at right sided of superior sagittal sinus wall, cortical veins of right frontal regions (cord sign, arrow). CT venography showed C,D) no contrast filled in thrombosed cortical vein in right frontal region. The dural venous sinus is well opacity by contrast medium.
Mentions: CTV (Figure 7A–D) has proved to be a reliable method to investigate the structure of the cerebral veins, with a reported sensitivity of 95% with multiplanar reformatted (MPR) images when compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the standard of reference.4,9 CTV is a promising for better delineation of venous anatomy, and equally sensitive for demonstrating thrombosis.3 However, common variants of the sinovenous system should not be mistaken for sinus thrombosis.9 CT venography is standardized and involves the following steps:

Bottom Line: This disorder is potentially lethal but treatable, oftenly it was overlooked in both clinical and radiologic in routine practice.Whenever, clinical suspected, prompt investigation by noninvasive imaging Magnetic resonance (MR) or advanced modilities such as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), MRV (MR Venography) will helpful in prompt diagnosis and treatment.By using of effective treatment will improve the prognosis of the patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Radiology.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral venous thrombosis is increasing common disease in daily practice with sharing clinical nonspecific symptoms. This disorder is potentially lethal but treatable, oftenly it was overlooked in both clinical and radiologic in routine practice. Whenever, clinical suspected, prompt investigation by noninvasive imaging Magnetic resonance (MR) or advanced modilities such as cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), MRV (MR Venography) will helpful in prompt diagnosis and treatment. These imaging modalities may reveal either direct sign (visualization of intraluminal clot) and indirect signs (paranchymatous change, intracranial hemorrhage). By using of effective treatment will improve the prognosis of the patient. This review summarizes insights into etiology, incidence, imaging modalities and current of the treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus