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The effect of aging and severity of sleep apnea on heart rate variability indices in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

Song MK, Ha JH, Ryu SH, Yu J, Park DH - Psychiatry Investig (2012)

Bottom Line: Stepwise multiple linear regressions were further executed to examine the effects of age, AHI, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and sleep parameters on the significant HRV indices.The two indices showed significant differences between the groups.On the contrary, the LF/HF ratio responded to AHI more sensitively than to age, suggesting that it is mainly associated with a sympathetic tone likely reflecting the severity of sleep apnea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropsychiatry, Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aims to analyze how much heart rate variability (HRV) indices discriminatively respond to age and severity of sleep apnea in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

Methods: 176 male OSAS patients were classified into four groups according to their age and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). The HRV indices were compared via analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). In particular, the partial correlation method was performed to identify the most statistically significant HRV indices in the time and frequency domains. Stepwise multiple linear regressions were further executed to examine the effects of age, AHI, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and sleep parameters on the significant HRV indices.

Results: The partial correlation analysis yielded the NN50 count (defined as the number of adjacent R-wave to R-wave intervals differing by more than 50 ms) and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio to be two most statistically significant HRV indices in both time and frequency domains. The two indices showed significant differences between the groups. The NN50 count was affected by age (p<0.001) and DBP (p=0.039), while the LF/HF ratio was affected by AHI (p<0.001), the amount of Stage 2 sleep (p=0.005), and age (p=0.021) in the order named in the regression analysis.

Conclusion: The NN50 count more sensitively responded to age than to AHI, suggesting that the index is mainly associated with an age-related parasympathetic system. On the contrary, the LF/HF ratio responded to AHI more sensitively than to age, suggesting that it is mainly associated with a sympathetic tone likely reflecting the severity of sleep apnea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the LF/HF ratio between the four OSAS groups. The ratio was significantly different (F=4.64, p=0.004) when adjusted by systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI) and sleep efficiency (SE). The contrast test further showed that Group 1 was significantly different from Group 4 (p<0.001). Similarly, Group 3 was significantly different from Group 4 (p=0.040). OSAS: obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, LF/HF ratio: Low frequency/High frequency ratio.
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Figure 3: Comparison of the LF/HF ratio between the four OSAS groups. The ratio was significantly different (F=4.64, p=0.004) when adjusted by systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI) and sleep efficiency (SE). The contrast test further showed that Group 1 was significantly different from Group 4 (p<0.001). Similarly, Group 3 was significantly different from Group 4 (p=0.040). OSAS: obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, LF/HF ratio: Low frequency/High frequency ratio.

Mentions: Additionally, there were statistically significant differences in VLF power, LF power, HF power, and LF/HF ratio, as determined by frequency-domain analysis. Specifically, there were statistically significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (p=0.005) in VLF power, between groups 1 and 2 (p=0.013), groups 2 and 3 (p=0.004), and groups 3 and 4 (p=0.015) in LF power; and between groups 1 and 3 (p=0.001) and groups 1 and 4 (p=0.001) in HF power, all as determined by the contrast test. The mean LF/HF ratio of was significantly different between groups 1 and 4 (p<0.001) and groups 3 and 4 (p=0.040), as determined by the contrast test (Figure 3).


The effect of aging and severity of sleep apnea on heart rate variability indices in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

Song MK, Ha JH, Ryu SH, Yu J, Park DH - Psychiatry Investig (2012)

Comparison of the LF/HF ratio between the four OSAS groups. The ratio was significantly different (F=4.64, p=0.004) when adjusted by systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI) and sleep efficiency (SE). The contrast test further showed that Group 1 was significantly different from Group 4 (p<0.001). Similarly, Group 3 was significantly different from Group 4 (p=0.040). OSAS: obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, LF/HF ratio: Low frequency/High frequency ratio.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3285743&req=5

Figure 3: Comparison of the LF/HF ratio between the four OSAS groups. The ratio was significantly different (F=4.64, p=0.004) when adjusted by systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI) and sleep efficiency (SE). The contrast test further showed that Group 1 was significantly different from Group 4 (p<0.001). Similarly, Group 3 was significantly different from Group 4 (p=0.040). OSAS: obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, LF/HF ratio: Low frequency/High frequency ratio.
Mentions: Additionally, there were statistically significant differences in VLF power, LF power, HF power, and LF/HF ratio, as determined by frequency-domain analysis. Specifically, there were statistically significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (p=0.005) in VLF power, between groups 1 and 2 (p=0.013), groups 2 and 3 (p=0.004), and groups 3 and 4 (p=0.015) in LF power; and between groups 1 and 3 (p=0.001) and groups 1 and 4 (p=0.001) in HF power, all as determined by the contrast test. The mean LF/HF ratio of was significantly different between groups 1 and 4 (p<0.001) and groups 3 and 4 (p=0.040), as determined by the contrast test (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Stepwise multiple linear regressions were further executed to examine the effects of age, AHI, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and sleep parameters on the significant HRV indices.The two indices showed significant differences between the groups.On the contrary, the LF/HF ratio responded to AHI more sensitively than to age, suggesting that it is mainly associated with a sympathetic tone likely reflecting the severity of sleep apnea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropsychiatry, Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aims to analyze how much heart rate variability (HRV) indices discriminatively respond to age and severity of sleep apnea in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

Methods: 176 male OSAS patients were classified into four groups according to their age and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). The HRV indices were compared via analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). In particular, the partial correlation method was performed to identify the most statistically significant HRV indices in the time and frequency domains. Stepwise multiple linear regressions were further executed to examine the effects of age, AHI, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and sleep parameters on the significant HRV indices.

Results: The partial correlation analysis yielded the NN50 count (defined as the number of adjacent R-wave to R-wave intervals differing by more than 50 ms) and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio to be two most statistically significant HRV indices in both time and frequency domains. The two indices showed significant differences between the groups. The NN50 count was affected by age (p<0.001) and DBP (p=0.039), while the LF/HF ratio was affected by AHI (p<0.001), the amount of Stage 2 sleep (p=0.005), and age (p=0.021) in the order named in the regression analysis.

Conclusion: The NN50 count more sensitively responded to age than to AHI, suggesting that the index is mainly associated with an age-related parasympathetic system. On the contrary, the LF/HF ratio responded to AHI more sensitively than to age, suggesting that it is mainly associated with a sympathetic tone likely reflecting the severity of sleep apnea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus