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Herbivory by a Phloem-feeding insect inhibits floral volatile production.

Pareja M, Qvarfordt E, Webster B, Mayon P, Pickett J, Birkett M, Glinwood R - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: The effect of the Brassica specialist aphid Lipaphis erysimi was stronger than the generalist aphid Myzus persicae and feeding by chewing larvae of the moth Plutella xylostella caused no reduction in floral volatile emission.Field observations showed no effect of L. erysimi-mediated floral volatile emission on the total number of flower visits by pollinators.The findings provide new insights into interactions between insect herbivores and plant chemistry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departmento de Entomologia, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
There is extensive knowledge on the effects of insect herbivory on volatile emission from vegetative tissue, but little is known about its impact on floral volatiles. We show that herbivory by phloem-feeding aphids inhibits floral volatile emission in white mustard Sinapis alba measured by gas chromatographic analysis of headspace volatiles. The effect of the Brassica specialist aphid Lipaphis erysimi was stronger than the generalist aphid Myzus persicae and feeding by chewing larvae of the moth Plutella xylostella caused no reduction in floral volatile emission. Field observations showed no effect of L. erysimi-mediated floral volatile emission on the total number of flower visits by pollinators. Olfactory bioassays suggested that although two aphid natural enemies could detect aphid inhibition of floral volatiles, their olfactory orientation to infested plants was not disrupted. This is the first demonstration that phloem-feeding herbivory can affect floral volatile emission, and that the outcome of interaction between herbivory and floral chemistry may differ depending on the herbivore's feeding mode and degree of specialisation. The findings provide new insights into interactions between insect herbivores and plant chemistry.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Response of ladybird C. septempunctata to different odour combinations in a two-way olfactometer.Figures represent mean number of observations in each olfactometer arm (± s.e.). UD: undamaged S. alba. Le: L. erysimi Mp: M. persicae. The different sections represent different comparisons carried out: A.) comparisons to test attraction to undamaged S. alba; B.) comparisons to test for attraction to L. erysimi-damaged plants; C.) comparisons between L. erysimi damage and M. persicae damage. * 0.05<p<0.01; ** 0.01<p<0.001.
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pone-0031971-g003: Response of ladybird C. septempunctata to different odour combinations in a two-way olfactometer.Figures represent mean number of observations in each olfactometer arm (± s.e.). UD: undamaged S. alba. Le: L. erysimi Mp: M. persicae. The different sections represent different comparisons carried out: A.) comparisons to test attraction to undamaged S. alba; B.) comparisons to test for attraction to L. erysimi-damaged plants; C.) comparisons between L. erysimi damage and M. persicae damage. * 0.05<p<0.01; ** 0.01<p<0.001.

Mentions: C. septempunctata was attracted by the odour of undamaged (UD) flowering S. alba plants and by odour of S. alba flowers (Figure 3A). Ladybirds significantly preferred the odour of flowers from undamaged plants over that of flowers from L. erysimi-damaged plants. However, they preferred odour of L. erysimi-damaged whole plants over undamaged whole plants, and preferred vegetative parts of L. erysimi-damaged plants over vegetative parts of undamaged plants (Fig. 3B). Ladybirds significantly preferred odour of M. persicae damaged plants over L. erysimi damaged plants, but showed no preference between plants damaged by the different aphids when odours from only flowers or vegetative parts were compared (Fig. 3C).


Herbivory by a Phloem-feeding insect inhibits floral volatile production.

Pareja M, Qvarfordt E, Webster B, Mayon P, Pickett J, Birkett M, Glinwood R - PLoS ONE (2012)

Response of ladybird C. septempunctata to different odour combinations in a two-way olfactometer.Figures represent mean number of observations in each olfactometer arm (± s.e.). UD: undamaged S. alba. Le: L. erysimi Mp: M. persicae. The different sections represent different comparisons carried out: A.) comparisons to test attraction to undamaged S. alba; B.) comparisons to test for attraction to L. erysimi-damaged plants; C.) comparisons between L. erysimi damage and M. persicae damage. * 0.05<p<0.01; ** 0.01<p<0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3285634&req=5

pone-0031971-g003: Response of ladybird C. septempunctata to different odour combinations in a two-way olfactometer.Figures represent mean number of observations in each olfactometer arm (± s.e.). UD: undamaged S. alba. Le: L. erysimi Mp: M. persicae. The different sections represent different comparisons carried out: A.) comparisons to test attraction to undamaged S. alba; B.) comparisons to test for attraction to L. erysimi-damaged plants; C.) comparisons between L. erysimi damage and M. persicae damage. * 0.05<p<0.01; ** 0.01<p<0.001.
Mentions: C. septempunctata was attracted by the odour of undamaged (UD) flowering S. alba plants and by odour of S. alba flowers (Figure 3A). Ladybirds significantly preferred the odour of flowers from undamaged plants over that of flowers from L. erysimi-damaged plants. However, they preferred odour of L. erysimi-damaged whole plants over undamaged whole plants, and preferred vegetative parts of L. erysimi-damaged plants over vegetative parts of undamaged plants (Fig. 3B). Ladybirds significantly preferred odour of M. persicae damaged plants over L. erysimi damaged plants, but showed no preference between plants damaged by the different aphids when odours from only flowers or vegetative parts were compared (Fig. 3C).

Bottom Line: The effect of the Brassica specialist aphid Lipaphis erysimi was stronger than the generalist aphid Myzus persicae and feeding by chewing larvae of the moth Plutella xylostella caused no reduction in floral volatile emission.Field observations showed no effect of L. erysimi-mediated floral volatile emission on the total number of flower visits by pollinators.The findings provide new insights into interactions between insect herbivores and plant chemistry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departmento de Entomologia, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
There is extensive knowledge on the effects of insect herbivory on volatile emission from vegetative tissue, but little is known about its impact on floral volatiles. We show that herbivory by phloem-feeding aphids inhibits floral volatile emission in white mustard Sinapis alba measured by gas chromatographic analysis of headspace volatiles. The effect of the Brassica specialist aphid Lipaphis erysimi was stronger than the generalist aphid Myzus persicae and feeding by chewing larvae of the moth Plutella xylostella caused no reduction in floral volatile emission. Field observations showed no effect of L. erysimi-mediated floral volatile emission on the total number of flower visits by pollinators. Olfactory bioassays suggested that although two aphid natural enemies could detect aphid inhibition of floral volatiles, their olfactory orientation to infested plants was not disrupted. This is the first demonstration that phloem-feeding herbivory can affect floral volatile emission, and that the outcome of interaction between herbivory and floral chemistry may differ depending on the herbivore's feeding mode and degree of specialisation. The findings provide new insights into interactions between insect herbivores and plant chemistry.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus