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Measuring empathizing and systemizing with a large US sample.

Wright DB, Skagerberg EM - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: These re-worded items were answered more rapidly than the original items, and for the SQ produced a more reliable scale.Females had on average higher empathizing scores and males had on average higher systemizing scores.If a female-male pair was chosen at random, the female would have the higher empathizing score about two-thirds of the time, and the males would have the higher systemizing score about two-thirds of the time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, United States of America. dwright@fiu.edu

ABSTRACT
A large number of people completed one of two versions of the empathizing quotient (EQ) and systemizing quotient (SQ). One version had the negatively phrased items all re-worded. These re-worded items were answered more rapidly than the original items, and for the SQ produced a more reliable scale. Subjects gave self-assessments of empathizing and systemizing, and these were moderately correlated, r ≈ .6, with their respective quotients. Females had on average higher empathizing scores and males had on average higher systemizing scores. If a female-male pair was chosen at random, the female would have the higher empathizing score about two-thirds of the time, and the males would have the higher systemizing score about two-thirds of the time.

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Using the difference between EQ and SQ for classifying cases.
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pone-0031661-g001: Using the difference between EQ and SQ for classifying cases.

Mentions: When plotting the results from the EQ and SQ, Baron-Cohen and colleagues claim five different ‘brain types’ can be described [14]. These are depicted in Figure 1. To create this classification scheme, first, both variables need to be standardized (for the non-clinical group if there are multiple groups) so that the standardized scores have a mean of zero and a standard deviation of one. Once the difference between these standardized quotients is calculated, the bands can be calculated in standard deviation units of this difference. Different papers use different methods to calculate the width of these bands. In Figure 1 the grey band, labeled B for Balanced, is for people who have a difference of less than one standard deviation from 0. People who have a difference score over one standard deviation are classified as either S (for Systemizing in light blue) or E (for Empathizing in pink), depending on which quotient is larger. If their difference is greater than two standard deviations then they are Extreme S, in yellow, or Extreme E, in green.


Measuring empathizing and systemizing with a large US sample.

Wright DB, Skagerberg EM - PLoS ONE (2012)

Using the difference between EQ and SQ for classifying cases.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3285168&req=5

pone-0031661-g001: Using the difference between EQ and SQ for classifying cases.
Mentions: When plotting the results from the EQ and SQ, Baron-Cohen and colleagues claim five different ‘brain types’ can be described [14]. These are depicted in Figure 1. To create this classification scheme, first, both variables need to be standardized (for the non-clinical group if there are multiple groups) so that the standardized scores have a mean of zero and a standard deviation of one. Once the difference between these standardized quotients is calculated, the bands can be calculated in standard deviation units of this difference. Different papers use different methods to calculate the width of these bands. In Figure 1 the grey band, labeled B for Balanced, is for people who have a difference of less than one standard deviation from 0. People who have a difference score over one standard deviation are classified as either S (for Systemizing in light blue) or E (for Empathizing in pink), depending on which quotient is larger. If their difference is greater than two standard deviations then they are Extreme S, in yellow, or Extreme E, in green.

Bottom Line: These re-worded items were answered more rapidly than the original items, and for the SQ produced a more reliable scale.Females had on average higher empathizing scores and males had on average higher systemizing scores.If a female-male pair was chosen at random, the female would have the higher empathizing score about two-thirds of the time, and the males would have the higher systemizing score about two-thirds of the time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, United States of America. dwright@fiu.edu

ABSTRACT
A large number of people completed one of two versions of the empathizing quotient (EQ) and systemizing quotient (SQ). One version had the negatively phrased items all re-worded. These re-worded items were answered more rapidly than the original items, and for the SQ produced a more reliable scale. Subjects gave self-assessments of empathizing and systemizing, and these were moderately correlated, r ≈ .6, with their respective quotients. Females had on average higher empathizing scores and males had on average higher systemizing scores. If a female-male pair was chosen at random, the female would have the higher empathizing score about two-thirds of the time, and the males would have the higher systemizing score about two-thirds of the time.

Show MeSH