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Q&A: What is the Open Connectome Project?

Vogelstein JT - Neural Syst Circuits (2011)

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, John Hopkins University,100 Whitehead Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2682, USA. joshuav@jhu.edu.

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Although it has been over a century since neuroscientists first conjectured that networks of neurons comprise the brain, technology has limited high-throughput investigations of neural circuitry until very recently... In 2005, the term connectome was coined independently by Patric Hagmann and Olaf Sporns, to describe the complete set of neural connections in a brain... Shortly thereafter, Narayanan "Bobby" Kasthuri and Jeff Lichtman published an article suggesting that "connectome" should refer to connections between neurons, which one can infer using Electron Microscopy (EM) and fluorescence microscopy (e.g., brainbow animals ) "Projectome", they suggested, is more appropriate for MRI based studies... Now, we have redundant copies of it, both in a two-dimensional image hierarchy and a custom volumetric database... I was in Boston at the beginning of February 2011 talking to Clay Reid (of Harvard University) about some of our preliminary results on analysis of networks... We are so fortunate to live in a time and place that values and affords this pursuit sufficiently to enable large communities of people to essentially sit around and think all day to try to figure this stuff out... The laws of physics and chemistry and biology effect everyone on the planet equally, no matter his or her background, genetics, beliefs, etc... It seems counterproductive and downright silly to not at least allow anybody with sufficient interest to contribute by making our current datasets and inferences available to all... The digital age dramatically changes the costs associated with dissemination of data in a number of ways... Unfortunately, publication is often delayed by years after data acquisition... Moreover, data sharing often takes significant activation energy... This project will acquire and database MRI and other data from about 1200 subjects... In contrast, OCP does not collect its own data, rather, hosts whatever data wants to be shared... Perhaps the best single source of information on open science available right now is Michael Nielson's book entitled, "Reinventing Discovery." To learn more about connectomes, I'm a fan of Olaf Sporns' book, "Networks of the Brain" or Sebastian Seung's upcoming book, "Connectome." Or just call/email me whenever.

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Joshua T. Vogelstein Biography. Joshua T. Vogelstein is an Assistant Research Scientist working with Professor Carey E. Priebe in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Johns Hopkins University. After obtaining his bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering, he obtained a master's degree in Applied Mathematics & Statistics and a PhD in Neuroscience at the John Hopkins School of Medicine. The focus of his work is statistical connectomics: the art of connectome data collection, analysis and interpretation, with the aim of acquiring new insights into the human condition. He hopes to soon integrate the genome into his work so that he can study the shalome: the complete 'ome of an individual. The Open Connectome Project, which Joshua is helping to establish, aims to make state-of-the-art neuroscience available to anyone with computer access, regardless of their nature or nurture.
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Figure 1: Joshua T. Vogelstein Biography. Joshua T. Vogelstein is an Assistant Research Scientist working with Professor Carey E. Priebe in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Johns Hopkins University. After obtaining his bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering, he obtained a master's degree in Applied Mathematics & Statistics and a PhD in Neuroscience at the John Hopkins School of Medicine. The focus of his work is statistical connectomics: the art of connectome data collection, analysis and interpretation, with the aim of acquiring new insights into the human condition. He hopes to soon integrate the genome into his work so that he can study the shalome: the complete 'ome of an individual. The Open Connectome Project, which Joshua is helping to establish, aims to make state-of-the-art neuroscience available to anyone with computer access, regardless of their nature or nurture.

Mentions: The OCP website has a bunch of links to technical articles, review articles, PR media, and related sites. Perhaps the best single source of information on open science available right now is Michael Nielson's book entitled, "Reinventing Discovery." To learn more about connectomes, I'm a fan of Olaf Sporns' book, "Networks of the Brain" or Sebastian Seung's upcoming book, "Connectome." Or just call/email me whenever. My email address is http://joshuav@jhu.edu, and my personal website is http://jovo.me/; I'm always happy to talk more about this stuff. A biography containing information about myself can be found in the legend to Figure 1.


Q&A: What is the Open Connectome Project?

Vogelstein JT - Neural Syst Circuits (2011)

Joshua T. Vogelstein Biography. Joshua T. Vogelstein is an Assistant Research Scientist working with Professor Carey E. Priebe in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Johns Hopkins University. After obtaining his bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering, he obtained a master's degree in Applied Mathematics & Statistics and a PhD in Neuroscience at the John Hopkins School of Medicine. The focus of his work is statistical connectomics: the art of connectome data collection, analysis and interpretation, with the aim of acquiring new insights into the human condition. He hopes to soon integrate the genome into his work so that he can study the shalome: the complete 'ome of an individual. The Open Connectome Project, which Joshua is helping to establish, aims to make state-of-the-art neuroscience available to anyone with computer access, regardless of their nature or nurture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3278382&req=5

Figure 1: Joshua T. Vogelstein Biography. Joshua T. Vogelstein is an Assistant Research Scientist working with Professor Carey E. Priebe in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Johns Hopkins University. After obtaining his bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering, he obtained a master's degree in Applied Mathematics & Statistics and a PhD in Neuroscience at the John Hopkins School of Medicine. The focus of his work is statistical connectomics: the art of connectome data collection, analysis and interpretation, with the aim of acquiring new insights into the human condition. He hopes to soon integrate the genome into his work so that he can study the shalome: the complete 'ome of an individual. The Open Connectome Project, which Joshua is helping to establish, aims to make state-of-the-art neuroscience available to anyone with computer access, regardless of their nature or nurture.
Mentions: The OCP website has a bunch of links to technical articles, review articles, PR media, and related sites. Perhaps the best single source of information on open science available right now is Michael Nielson's book entitled, "Reinventing Discovery." To learn more about connectomes, I'm a fan of Olaf Sporns' book, "Networks of the Brain" or Sebastian Seung's upcoming book, "Connectome." Or just call/email me whenever. My email address is http://joshuav@jhu.edu, and my personal website is http://jovo.me/; I'm always happy to talk more about this stuff. A biography containing information about myself can be found in the legend to Figure 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, John Hopkins University,100 Whitehead Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2682, USA. joshuav@jhu.edu.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Although it has been over a century since neuroscientists first conjectured that networks of neurons comprise the brain, technology has limited high-throughput investigations of neural circuitry until very recently... In 2005, the term connectome was coined independently by Patric Hagmann and Olaf Sporns, to describe the complete set of neural connections in a brain... Shortly thereafter, Narayanan "Bobby" Kasthuri and Jeff Lichtman published an article suggesting that "connectome" should refer to connections between neurons, which one can infer using Electron Microscopy (EM) and fluorescence microscopy (e.g., brainbow animals ) "Projectome", they suggested, is more appropriate for MRI based studies... Now, we have redundant copies of it, both in a two-dimensional image hierarchy and a custom volumetric database... I was in Boston at the beginning of February 2011 talking to Clay Reid (of Harvard University) about some of our preliminary results on analysis of networks... We are so fortunate to live in a time and place that values and affords this pursuit sufficiently to enable large communities of people to essentially sit around and think all day to try to figure this stuff out... The laws of physics and chemistry and biology effect everyone on the planet equally, no matter his or her background, genetics, beliefs, etc... It seems counterproductive and downright silly to not at least allow anybody with sufficient interest to contribute by making our current datasets and inferences available to all... The digital age dramatically changes the costs associated with dissemination of data in a number of ways... Unfortunately, publication is often delayed by years after data acquisition... Moreover, data sharing often takes significant activation energy... This project will acquire and database MRI and other data from about 1200 subjects... In contrast, OCP does not collect its own data, rather, hosts whatever data wants to be shared... Perhaps the best single source of information on open science available right now is Michael Nielson's book entitled, "Reinventing Discovery." To learn more about connectomes, I'm a fan of Olaf Sporns' book, "Networks of the Brain" or Sebastian Seung's upcoming book, "Connectome." Or just call/email me whenever.

No MeSH data available.