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Influences of the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene on cardiac structure and function of ball game players.

Jang Y, Kim SM - J Negat Results Biomed (2012)

Bottom Line: However, there were no significant association between any echocardiographic data and the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene in the both controls and ball game players.Our data suggests that the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene may not significantly contribute to the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players, although sporting disciplines of ball game players may influence the changes in LVmassI value of these athletes.Further studies using a larger sample size and other genetic markers in the ACE gene will be needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Except for the I/D polymorphism in the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, there were few reports about the relationship between other genetic polymorphisms in this gene and the changes in cardiac structure and function of athletes. Thus, we investigated whether the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene is associated with the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players. Total 85 healthy ball game players were recruited in this study, and they were composed of 35 controls and 50 ball game players, respectively. Cardiac structure and function were measured by 2-D echocardiography, and the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene analyzed by the SNaPshot method.

Results: There were significant differences in left ventricular mass index (LVmassI) value among each sporting discipline studied. Especially in the athletes of basketball disciplines, indicated the highest LVmassI value than those of other sporting disciplines studied (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant association between any echocardiographic data and the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene in the both controls and ball game players.

Conclusions: Our data suggests that the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene may not significantly contribute to the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players, although sporting disciplines of ball game players may influence the changes in LVmassI value of these athletes. Further studies using a larger sample size and other genetic markers in the ACE gene will be needed.

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An echocardiogram of a subject.
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Figure 1: An echocardiogram of a subject.

Mentions: The anthropological parameters of the participants of this study were measured using IN-BODY 3.0 (Bio-Space, Co. Ltd., Korea) and the characteristics related to cardiac structure and function such as aortic root (AR), left ventricular internal dimension at end-diastole (LVIDd), left ventricular internal dimension at end-systole (LVIDs), left ventricular mass (LVmass), left ventricular mass index (LVmassI), stroke volume (SV), resting heart rate (HRrest), cardiac output (CO) and percent of fractional shortening (FS [%]) were measured using M-mode echocardiography in accordance with the instruction established by American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) (Figure 1). Also, if the LVmassI value of the subject is 125 g/m2 or more, the subject was judged to have left ventricular hypertrophy [21].


Influences of the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene on cardiac structure and function of ball game players.

Jang Y, Kim SM - J Negat Results Biomed (2012)

An echocardiogram of a subject.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3278340&req=5

Figure 1: An echocardiogram of a subject.
Mentions: The anthropological parameters of the participants of this study were measured using IN-BODY 3.0 (Bio-Space, Co. Ltd., Korea) and the characteristics related to cardiac structure and function such as aortic root (AR), left ventricular internal dimension at end-diastole (LVIDd), left ventricular internal dimension at end-systole (LVIDs), left ventricular mass (LVmass), left ventricular mass index (LVmassI), stroke volume (SV), resting heart rate (HRrest), cardiac output (CO) and percent of fractional shortening (FS [%]) were measured using M-mode echocardiography in accordance with the instruction established by American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) (Figure 1). Also, if the LVmassI value of the subject is 125 g/m2 or more, the subject was judged to have left ventricular hypertrophy [21].

Bottom Line: However, there were no significant association between any echocardiographic data and the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene in the both controls and ball game players.Our data suggests that the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene may not significantly contribute to the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players, although sporting disciplines of ball game players may influence the changes in LVmassI value of these athletes.Further studies using a larger sample size and other genetic markers in the ACE gene will be needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Except for the I/D polymorphism in the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, there were few reports about the relationship between other genetic polymorphisms in this gene and the changes in cardiac structure and function of athletes. Thus, we investigated whether the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene is associated with the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players. Total 85 healthy ball game players were recruited in this study, and they were composed of 35 controls and 50 ball game players, respectively. Cardiac structure and function were measured by 2-D echocardiography, and the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene analyzed by the SNaPshot method.

Results: There were significant differences in left ventricular mass index (LVmassI) value among each sporting discipline studied. Especially in the athletes of basketball disciplines, indicated the highest LVmassI value than those of other sporting disciplines studied (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant association between any echocardiographic data and the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene in the both controls and ball game players.

Conclusions: Our data suggests that the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene may not significantly contribute to the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players, although sporting disciplines of ball game players may influence the changes in LVmassI value of these athletes. Further studies using a larger sample size and other genetic markers in the ACE gene will be needed.

Show MeSH