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Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements.

Alastruey J, Khir AW, Matthys KS, Segers P, Sherwin SJ, Verdonck PR, Parker KH, Peiró J - J Biomech (2011)

Bottom Line: In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate.In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10(-6)) for the flow rate.These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. jordi.alastruey-arimon@imperial.ac.uk

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Experimental (exp) and simulated elastic (elas) and visco-elastic (visc) pressure (left) and flow (right) waveforms in the midpoint of the thoracic aorta I, left renal artery, right iliac-femoral III artery and right carotid artery in the hydraulic model in Fig. 1. Note the different scales of flow rates.
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f0015: Experimental (exp) and simulated elastic (elas) and visco-elastic (visc) pressure (left) and flow (right) waveforms in the midpoint of the thoracic aorta I, left renal artery, right iliac-femoral III artery and right carotid artery in the hydraulic model in Fig. 1. Note the different scales of flow rates.

Mentions: Fig. 3 compares the ensemble averaged experimental waveforms at four locations with the numerical predictions obtained using both the elastic and the visco-elastic 1-D formulations. As in the purely elastic study, we matched the onset of the experimental and numerical systolic ejections. These comparisons are representative of the results obtained at other measurement sites and show the ability of visco-elasticity to reduce the high-frequency oscillations produced by the elastic formulation, especially in peripheral vessels.


Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements.

Alastruey J, Khir AW, Matthys KS, Segers P, Sherwin SJ, Verdonck PR, Parker KH, Peiró J - J Biomech (2011)

Experimental (exp) and simulated elastic (elas) and visco-elastic (visc) pressure (left) and flow (right) waveforms in the midpoint of the thoracic aorta I, left renal artery, right iliac-femoral III artery and right carotid artery in the hydraulic model in Fig. 1. Note the different scales of flow rates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3278302&req=5

f0015: Experimental (exp) and simulated elastic (elas) and visco-elastic (visc) pressure (left) and flow (right) waveforms in the midpoint of the thoracic aorta I, left renal artery, right iliac-femoral III artery and right carotid artery in the hydraulic model in Fig. 1. Note the different scales of flow rates.
Mentions: Fig. 3 compares the ensemble averaged experimental waveforms at four locations with the numerical predictions obtained using both the elastic and the visco-elastic 1-D formulations. As in the purely elastic study, we matched the onset of the experimental and numerical systolic ejections. These comparisons are representative of the results obtained at other measurement sites and show the ability of visco-elasticity to reduce the high-frequency oscillations produced by the elastic formulation, especially in peripheral vessels.

Bottom Line: In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate.In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10(-6)) for the flow rate.These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. jordi.alastruey-arimon@imperial.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus