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Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements.

Alastruey J, Khir AW, Matthys KS, Segers P, Sherwin SJ, Verdonck PR, Parker KH, Peiró J - J Biomech (2011)

Bottom Line: In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate.In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10(-6)) for the flow rate.These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. jordi.alastruey-arimon@imperial.ac.uk

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(top) Experimental uniaxial load and extension with time for a sample of the silicone used in the experimental arterial network. (bottom) Load-extension loop for the first load–unload cycle, whose direction is indicated by the arrows. A cubic spline was fitted to the loading and unloading points measured in the extension test. Loads and extensions are shown normalised by their corresponding maximum values.
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f0010: (top) Experimental uniaxial load and extension with time for a sample of the silicone used in the experimental arterial network. (bottom) Load-extension loop for the first load–unload cycle, whose direction is indicated by the arrows. A cubic spline was fitted to the loading and unloading points measured in the extension test. Loads and extensions are shown normalised by their corresponding maximum values.

Mentions: Here we estimated (which was not measured in Matthys et al., 2007) from an uniaxial extension test in a sample of the same silicone material used in the experimental setup. Fig. 2 (top) shows the extension and measured load F used in the test, which were normalised by their corresponding maximum values Fmax and . The test was carried out using a tensometer and 1 kN load cell (Instron 5542, High Wycombe, UK), loading and unloading at a rate of 20 mm  to a maximum extension of 1 mm. Three consecutive loading and unloading cycles were followed by 30 s at zero extension, loading to maximum extension which was held for 60 s before the final unloading to zero extension.


Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements.

Alastruey J, Khir AW, Matthys KS, Segers P, Sherwin SJ, Verdonck PR, Parker KH, Peiró J - J Biomech (2011)

(top) Experimental uniaxial load and extension with time for a sample of the silicone used in the experimental arterial network. (bottom) Load-extension loop for the first load–unload cycle, whose direction is indicated by the arrows. A cubic spline was fitted to the loading and unloading points measured in the extension test. Loads and extensions are shown normalised by their corresponding maximum values.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3278302&req=5

f0010: (top) Experimental uniaxial load and extension with time for a sample of the silicone used in the experimental arterial network. (bottom) Load-extension loop for the first load–unload cycle, whose direction is indicated by the arrows. A cubic spline was fitted to the loading and unloading points measured in the extension test. Loads and extensions are shown normalised by their corresponding maximum values.
Mentions: Here we estimated (which was not measured in Matthys et al., 2007) from an uniaxial extension test in a sample of the same silicone material used in the experimental setup. Fig. 2 (top) shows the extension and measured load F used in the test, which were normalised by their corresponding maximum values Fmax and . The test was carried out using a tensometer and 1 kN load cell (Instron 5542, High Wycombe, UK), loading and unloading at a rate of 20 mm  to a maximum extension of 1 mm. Three consecutive loading and unloading cycles were followed by 30 s at zero extension, loading to maximum extension which was held for 60 s before the final unloading to zero extension.

Bottom Line: In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate.In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10(-6)) for the flow rate.These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. jordi.alastruey-arimon@imperial.ac.uk

Show MeSH