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Characterization of the inflammatory response to four commercial bone graft substitutes using a murine biocompatibility model.

Markel DC, Guthrie ST, Wu B, Song Z, Wooley PH - J Inflamm Res (2012)

Bottom Line: Bone grafting is utilized in nearly all orthopedic subspecialties and in most anatomic regions.Pouch fluid was extracted, mRNA isolated, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions carried out to detect interleukin-1 gene expression as a marker for inflammation.When choosing a bone grafting method, surgeons should consider both the efficacy and safety of methods and materials used.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Southfield, MI.

ABSTRACT
Bone grafting is utilized in nearly all orthopedic subspecialties and in most anatomic regions. Bone graft substitutes have the potential to offer similar efficacy as autogenous grafts without the morbidity of harvest. Several studies have noted the efficacy of new-generation bone substitute products, but few studies have evaluated their safety. This study characterizes and quantifies the inflammatory reaction to four different commercially available bone graft substitutes, which were examined using the in vivo murine air pouch biocompatibility model. One coralline hydroxyapatite product was chosen as an example of a purely osteoconductive material. Three demineralized bone matrix products were chosen to represent products that are both osteoconductive and osteoinductive. Samples were implanted in a murine air pouch and harvested after 14 days in situ. Pouch fluid was extracted, mRNA isolated, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions carried out to detect interleukin-1 gene expression as a marker for inflammation. In addition, multiple histological characteristics were examined to quantify cellular responses to the implanted materials. All bone graft substitutes induced a significant inflammatory response compared with negative controls. Histology and polymerase chain reaction data indicated that the level of inflammatory reaction was elevated in materials with a higher demineralized bone matrix to carrier proportion. The hydroxyapatite product generated a low inflammatory reaction. In conclusion, this study used an in vivo model of biocompatibility to demonstrate that a significant inflammatory reaction occurs when using implanted bone graft substitutes. When choosing a bone grafting method, surgeons should consider both the efficacy and safety of methods and materials used. Further studies are necessary to determine the ideal bone graft material to maximize efficacy while minimizing morbidity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Interleukin-1 gene copies produced using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with mRNA extracted from the air pouches of control and bone graft substitute-stimulated mice.Notes:aP < 0.05 versus saline control. n = 6 mice/group.Abbreviations: SE, standard error; mRNA, messenger ribonucleic acid.
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f5-jir-5-013: Interleukin-1 gene copies produced using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with mRNA extracted from the air pouches of control and bone graft substitute-stimulated mice.Notes:aP < 0.05 versus saline control. n = 6 mice/group.Abbreviations: SE, standard error; mRNA, messenger ribonucleic acid.

Mentions: Reverse transcription-PCR was performed using the mRNA extracted from cells within the pouch fluid. Murine IL-1 primers were used to determine IL-1 expression as a marker to quantify the inflammatory reaction within the cavity of the pouch. Results are shown in Figure 5. Compared with the saline control, all compounds showed significantly higher levels of IL-1 expression (P < 0.05). The highest level of IL-1 expression was observed in the Accell DBM-100-containing air pouches; the increased expression was statistically significant when compared with both ProOsteon and Accell Connexus (P < 0.05).


Characterization of the inflammatory response to four commercial bone graft substitutes using a murine biocompatibility model.

Markel DC, Guthrie ST, Wu B, Song Z, Wooley PH - J Inflamm Res (2012)

Interleukin-1 gene copies produced using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with mRNA extracted from the air pouches of control and bone graft substitute-stimulated mice.Notes:aP < 0.05 versus saline control. n = 6 mice/group.Abbreviations: SE, standard error; mRNA, messenger ribonucleic acid.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3278258&req=5

f5-jir-5-013: Interleukin-1 gene copies produced using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with mRNA extracted from the air pouches of control and bone graft substitute-stimulated mice.Notes:aP < 0.05 versus saline control. n = 6 mice/group.Abbreviations: SE, standard error; mRNA, messenger ribonucleic acid.
Mentions: Reverse transcription-PCR was performed using the mRNA extracted from cells within the pouch fluid. Murine IL-1 primers were used to determine IL-1 expression as a marker to quantify the inflammatory reaction within the cavity of the pouch. Results are shown in Figure 5. Compared with the saline control, all compounds showed significantly higher levels of IL-1 expression (P < 0.05). The highest level of IL-1 expression was observed in the Accell DBM-100-containing air pouches; the increased expression was statistically significant when compared with both ProOsteon and Accell Connexus (P < 0.05).

Bottom Line: Bone grafting is utilized in nearly all orthopedic subspecialties and in most anatomic regions.Pouch fluid was extracted, mRNA isolated, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions carried out to detect interleukin-1 gene expression as a marker for inflammation.When choosing a bone grafting method, surgeons should consider both the efficacy and safety of methods and materials used.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Southfield, MI.

ABSTRACT
Bone grafting is utilized in nearly all orthopedic subspecialties and in most anatomic regions. Bone graft substitutes have the potential to offer similar efficacy as autogenous grafts without the morbidity of harvest. Several studies have noted the efficacy of new-generation bone substitute products, but few studies have evaluated their safety. This study characterizes and quantifies the inflammatory reaction to four different commercially available bone graft substitutes, which were examined using the in vivo murine air pouch biocompatibility model. One coralline hydroxyapatite product was chosen as an example of a purely osteoconductive material. Three demineralized bone matrix products were chosen to represent products that are both osteoconductive and osteoinductive. Samples were implanted in a murine air pouch and harvested after 14 days in situ. Pouch fluid was extracted, mRNA isolated, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions carried out to detect interleukin-1 gene expression as a marker for inflammation. In addition, multiple histological characteristics were examined to quantify cellular responses to the implanted materials. All bone graft substitutes induced a significant inflammatory response compared with negative controls. Histology and polymerase chain reaction data indicated that the level of inflammatory reaction was elevated in materials with a higher demineralized bone matrix to carrier proportion. The hydroxyapatite product generated a low inflammatory reaction. In conclusion, this study used an in vivo model of biocompatibility to demonstrate that a significant inflammatory reaction occurs when using implanted bone graft substitutes. When choosing a bone grafting method, surgeons should consider both the efficacy and safety of methods and materials used. Further studies are necessary to determine the ideal bone graft material to maximize efficacy while minimizing morbidity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus