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Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes.

Vinsnes AG, Helbostad JL, Nyrønning S, Harkless GE, Granbo R, Seim A - Clin Interv Aging (2012)

Bottom Line: This result was statistically significant after adjusting for baseline level, age, sex, and functional status.The intervention group had significant better results compared with the control group after an individualized training program designed to improve ADL and physical capacity.Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of a goal-oriented physical training program toward NH residents UI complaints.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway. anne.g.vinsnes@hist.no

ABSTRACT

Background: Residents in nursing homes (NHs) are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI.

Objective: To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL) and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI.

Materials and methods: This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48) or a control group (n = 50) after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15). Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention.

Results: Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis, 35 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group. The average age was 84.3 years. The 3 months' postintervention adjusted mean difference between groups according to amount of leakage was 191 g (P = 0.03). This result was statistically significant after adjusting for baseline level, age, sex, and functional status. The leakage increased in residents not receiving the experimental intervention, while UI in the training group showed improvement.

Conclusion: The intervention group had significant better results compared with the control group after an individualized training program designed to improve ADL and physical capacity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of a goal-oriented physical training program toward NH residents UI complaints.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of the enrolment, intervention allocation, follow-up, and data analysis.
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f1-cia-7-045: Flow diagram of the enrolment, intervention allocation, follow-up, and data analysis.

Mentions: The randomization was based on a random numbers list. Consequently, 48 residents were randomized into the intervention group and 50 residents were placed in the control group. Figure 1 displays the accounting of the subjects through the phases of the study.


Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes.

Vinsnes AG, Helbostad JL, Nyrønning S, Harkless GE, Granbo R, Seim A - Clin Interv Aging (2012)

Flow diagram of the enrolment, intervention allocation, follow-up, and data analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3278198&req=5

f1-cia-7-045: Flow diagram of the enrolment, intervention allocation, follow-up, and data analysis.
Mentions: The randomization was based on a random numbers list. Consequently, 48 residents were randomized into the intervention group and 50 residents were placed in the control group. Figure 1 displays the accounting of the subjects through the phases of the study.

Bottom Line: This result was statistically significant after adjusting for baseline level, age, sex, and functional status.The intervention group had significant better results compared with the control group after an individualized training program designed to improve ADL and physical capacity.Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of a goal-oriented physical training program toward NH residents UI complaints.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway. anne.g.vinsnes@hist.no

ABSTRACT

Background: Residents in nursing homes (NHs) are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI.

Objective: To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL) and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI.

Materials and methods: This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48) or a control group (n = 50) after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15). Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention.

Results: Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis, 35 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group. The average age was 84.3 years. The 3 months' postintervention adjusted mean difference between groups according to amount of leakage was 191 g (P = 0.03). This result was statistically significant after adjusting for baseline level, age, sex, and functional status. The leakage increased in residents not receiving the experimental intervention, while UI in the training group showed improvement.

Conclusion: The intervention group had significant better results compared with the control group after an individualized training program designed to improve ADL and physical capacity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of a goal-oriented physical training program toward NH residents UI complaints.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus