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Transcriptome analysis of anti-fatty liver action by Campari tomato using a zebrafish diet-induced obesity model.

Tainaka T, Shimada Y, Kuroyanagi J, Zang L, Oka T, Nishimura Y, Nishimura N, Tanaka T - Nutr Metab (Lond) (2011)

Bottom Line: We focused on "Campari" tomato, which suppressed increase of body weight, plasma TG, and lipid droplets in livers of DIO-zebrafish.Campari tomato decreased srebf1 mRNA by increase of foxo1 gene expression, which may depend on high contents of β-carotene in this strain.DIO-zebrafish can discriminate the anti-obesity effects of different strains of vegetables, and will become a powerful tool to assess outcomes and find novel mechanisms of anti-obesity effects of natural products.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoinformatics, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie, Japan. tanaka@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: High dietary intake of vegetable products is beneficial against obesity and its related diseases such as dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer. We previously developed a diet-induced obesity model of zebrafish (DIO-zebrafish) that develops visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia, and liver steatosis. Zebrafish is a polyphagous animal; thus we hypothesized that DIO-zebrafish could be used for transcriptome analysis of anti-obesity effects of vegetables.

Results: Each vegetable exhibited different effects against obesity. We focused on "Campari" tomato, which suppressed increase of body weight, plasma TG, and lipid droplets in livers of DIO-zebrafish. Campari tomato decreased srebf1 mRNA by increase of foxo1 gene expression, which may depend on high contents of β-carotene in this strain.

Conclusions: Campari tomato ameliorates diet-induced obesity, especially dyslipidemia and liver steatosis via downregulation of gene expression related to lipogenesis. DIO-zebrafish can discriminate the anti-obesity effects of different strains of vegetables, and will become a powerful tool to assess outcomes and find novel mechanisms of anti-obesity effects of natural products.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Assessment of body weight, plasma TG, and hepatic steatosis in zebrafish overfed with Campari and regular tomatoes. (A) Feeding condition of each group. Group 1, normal feeding; group 2, overfeeding of Artemia with Tetramin (vehicle); group 3, overfeeding with regular tomato; group 4, overfeeding with Campari tomato. Feeding experiments were conducted over 2 and 4 weeks. (B) Average body weight in each group during 4-week feeding experiments. Values are mean ± SD. Each group contained 20 samples. **P < 0.05; ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (C) Change of plasma TG levels in the each group. ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (D) Feeding behaviour assay counting Artemia numbers 90 min after feeding at 2 weeks. No significant difference was observed among vehicle, regular tomato, and Campari tomato administration in overfeeding groups. (E) Oil red O staining of liver sections. Campari tomato reduced the number and size of lipid droplets (red) compared with overfeeding and overfeeding regular tomato. (F and G) qPCR-assessed gene expression in the livers of DIO and normally fed zebrafish. Expression of ppar-ab (F) and ppargc1-like (G), a zebrafish homolog of human PPAR-α and PPARGC1 (PGC-1α, was normalized to actb expression. Values are mean ± SE (n = 5/group). *P < 0.05 vs. vehicle with overfeeding (OF).
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Figure 1: Assessment of body weight, plasma TG, and hepatic steatosis in zebrafish overfed with Campari and regular tomatoes. (A) Feeding condition of each group. Group 1, normal feeding; group 2, overfeeding of Artemia with Tetramin (vehicle); group 3, overfeeding with regular tomato; group 4, overfeeding with Campari tomato. Feeding experiments were conducted over 2 and 4 weeks. (B) Average body weight in each group during 4-week feeding experiments. Values are mean ± SD. Each group contained 20 samples. **P < 0.05; ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (C) Change of plasma TG levels in the each group. ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (D) Feeding behaviour assay counting Artemia numbers 90 min after feeding at 2 weeks. No significant difference was observed among vehicle, regular tomato, and Campari tomato administration in overfeeding groups. (E) Oil red O staining of liver sections. Campari tomato reduced the number and size of lipid droplets (red) compared with overfeeding and overfeeding regular tomato. (F and G) qPCR-assessed gene expression in the livers of DIO and normally fed zebrafish. Expression of ppar-ab (F) and ppargc1-like (G), a zebrafish homolog of human PPAR-α and PPARGC1 (PGC-1α, was normalized to actb expression. Values are mean ± SE (n = 5/group). *P < 0.05 vs. vehicle with overfeeding (OF).

Mentions: Adult zebrafish (AB, ZIRC, Eugene, OR, USA) were kept at 28°C under a 14-h light:10-h dark cycle, and water conditions of environmental quality were maintained according to the Zebrafish Book [13]. Zebrafish were assigned into each dietary group for 2 or 4 weeks with 5 fish/1.7-L tank. Zebrafish in the overfeeding group were fed three times/day with Artemia (60 mg cysts/fish/day; Miyako Kagaku, Tokyo, Japan). Zebrafish in the control group were fed once daily in the morning with Artemia (5 mg cysts/fish/day) from 3.5 months postfertilization (mpf). Zebrafish were fed vegetable-containing flake food (2 mg/day) 3 times at 20 min before Artemia feeding during experiments (Figure 1A).


Transcriptome analysis of anti-fatty liver action by Campari tomato using a zebrafish diet-induced obesity model.

Tainaka T, Shimada Y, Kuroyanagi J, Zang L, Oka T, Nishimura Y, Nishimura N, Tanaka T - Nutr Metab (Lond) (2011)

Assessment of body weight, plasma TG, and hepatic steatosis in zebrafish overfed with Campari and regular tomatoes. (A) Feeding condition of each group. Group 1, normal feeding; group 2, overfeeding of Artemia with Tetramin (vehicle); group 3, overfeeding with regular tomato; group 4, overfeeding with Campari tomato. Feeding experiments were conducted over 2 and 4 weeks. (B) Average body weight in each group during 4-week feeding experiments. Values are mean ± SD. Each group contained 20 samples. **P < 0.05; ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (C) Change of plasma TG levels in the each group. ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (D) Feeding behaviour assay counting Artemia numbers 90 min after feeding at 2 weeks. No significant difference was observed among vehicle, regular tomato, and Campari tomato administration in overfeeding groups. (E) Oil red O staining of liver sections. Campari tomato reduced the number and size of lipid droplets (red) compared with overfeeding and overfeeding regular tomato. (F and G) qPCR-assessed gene expression in the livers of DIO and normally fed zebrafish. Expression of ppar-ab (F) and ppargc1-like (G), a zebrafish homolog of human PPAR-α and PPARGC1 (PGC-1α, was normalized to actb expression. Values are mean ± SE (n = 5/group). *P < 0.05 vs. vehicle with overfeeding (OF).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3275548&req=5

Figure 1: Assessment of body weight, plasma TG, and hepatic steatosis in zebrafish overfed with Campari and regular tomatoes. (A) Feeding condition of each group. Group 1, normal feeding; group 2, overfeeding of Artemia with Tetramin (vehicle); group 3, overfeeding with regular tomato; group 4, overfeeding with Campari tomato. Feeding experiments were conducted over 2 and 4 weeks. (B) Average body weight in each group during 4-week feeding experiments. Values are mean ± SD. Each group contained 20 samples. **P < 0.05; ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (C) Change of plasma TG levels in the each group. ***P < 0.01 vs. vehicle with overfeeding, black circles. (D) Feeding behaviour assay counting Artemia numbers 90 min after feeding at 2 weeks. No significant difference was observed among vehicle, regular tomato, and Campari tomato administration in overfeeding groups. (E) Oil red O staining of liver sections. Campari tomato reduced the number and size of lipid droplets (red) compared with overfeeding and overfeeding regular tomato. (F and G) qPCR-assessed gene expression in the livers of DIO and normally fed zebrafish. Expression of ppar-ab (F) and ppargc1-like (G), a zebrafish homolog of human PPAR-α and PPARGC1 (PGC-1α, was normalized to actb expression. Values are mean ± SE (n = 5/group). *P < 0.05 vs. vehicle with overfeeding (OF).
Mentions: Adult zebrafish (AB, ZIRC, Eugene, OR, USA) were kept at 28°C under a 14-h light:10-h dark cycle, and water conditions of environmental quality were maintained according to the Zebrafish Book [13]. Zebrafish were assigned into each dietary group for 2 or 4 weeks with 5 fish/1.7-L tank. Zebrafish in the overfeeding group were fed three times/day with Artemia (60 mg cysts/fish/day; Miyako Kagaku, Tokyo, Japan). Zebrafish in the control group were fed once daily in the morning with Artemia (5 mg cysts/fish/day) from 3.5 months postfertilization (mpf). Zebrafish were fed vegetable-containing flake food (2 mg/day) 3 times at 20 min before Artemia feeding during experiments (Figure 1A).

Bottom Line: We focused on "Campari" tomato, which suppressed increase of body weight, plasma TG, and lipid droplets in livers of DIO-zebrafish.Campari tomato decreased srebf1 mRNA by increase of foxo1 gene expression, which may depend on high contents of β-carotene in this strain.DIO-zebrafish can discriminate the anti-obesity effects of different strains of vegetables, and will become a powerful tool to assess outcomes and find novel mechanisms of anti-obesity effects of natural products.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoinformatics, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie, Japan. tanaka@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: High dietary intake of vegetable products is beneficial against obesity and its related diseases such as dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer. We previously developed a diet-induced obesity model of zebrafish (DIO-zebrafish) that develops visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia, and liver steatosis. Zebrafish is a polyphagous animal; thus we hypothesized that DIO-zebrafish could be used for transcriptome analysis of anti-obesity effects of vegetables.

Results: Each vegetable exhibited different effects against obesity. We focused on "Campari" tomato, which suppressed increase of body weight, plasma TG, and lipid droplets in livers of DIO-zebrafish. Campari tomato decreased srebf1 mRNA by increase of foxo1 gene expression, which may depend on high contents of β-carotene in this strain.

Conclusions: Campari tomato ameliorates diet-induced obesity, especially dyslipidemia and liver steatosis via downregulation of gene expression related to lipogenesis. DIO-zebrafish can discriminate the anti-obesity effects of different strains of vegetables, and will become a powerful tool to assess outcomes and find novel mechanisms of anti-obesity effects of natural products.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus