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Phylogenetic analysis of strains of Orf virus isolated from two outbreaks of the disease in sheep in Greece.

Billinis C, Mavrogianni VS, Spyrou V, Fthenakis GC - Virol. J. (2012)

Bottom Line: The homology of the nucleotide and amino-acid sequences between the two Greek isolates was 99.0% and 98.8%, respectively.We suggest that there can be differences between strains based on their geographical origin.However, differences in the origin of strains or in the clinical presentation of the disease may not be associated with their pathogenicity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Faculty, University of Thessaly, Karditsa, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although orf is endemic around the world, there are few descriptions of Orf virus strains and comparisons of these strains. We report the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the partial B2L gene of Orf virus from two outbreaks of the disease in Greece. The first was an outbreak of genital form of the disease in a flock imported from France, whilst the second was an outbreak of the disease in the udder skin of ewes and around the mouth of lambs in an indigenous flock.

Results: Phylogenetic analysis was performed on a part (498 bp) of the B2L gene of 35 Parapoxvirus isolates, including the two Orf virus isolates recovered from each of the two outbreaks in the present study. This analysis revealed that the maximum nucleotide and amino-acid variation amongst Orf virus strains worldwide (n = 33) was 8.1% and 9.6%, respectively. The homology of the nucleotide and amino-acid sequences between the two Greek isolates was 99.0% and 98.8%, respectively. The two Greek isolates clustered only with Orf virus strains.

Conclusions: We suggest that there can be differences between strains based on their geographical origin. However, differences in the origin of strains or in the clinical presentation of the disease may not be associated with their pathogenicity. More work is required to determine if differing clinical presentations are linked to viral strain differences or if other factors, e.g., flock immunity, method of exposure or genetic susceptibility, are more important to determine the clinical presentation of the infection.

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Representative lesions of genital form of orf in ewes. (a) Orf scabs scattered in the lower part of the vulva and the entrance of the vagina of a ewe. (b) Purulent vaginal discharge in a ewe with genital form of orf.
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Figure 1: Representative lesions of genital form of orf in ewes. (a) Orf scabs scattered in the lower part of the vulva and the entrance of the vagina of a ewe. (b) Purulent vaginal discharge in a ewe with genital form of orf.

Mentions: The first outbreak occurred in 2003 and involved cases of genital form of orf. It was recorded in an intensive dairy flock with 115 Lacaune-breed ewes, in the region of Peloponnese in South Greece (coordinates: 37.06 °N, 21.63 °E). Animals in the flock were imported from France after the end of the breeding season. Cases were diagnosed 2 months after the end of the mating season, soon after establishment of the animals in the farm. Clinically, lesions characteristic of orf (papules, postules and scabs) were recorded in 78 ewes. Lesions were localised in the lower part of the vulva and the entrance of the vagina (Figure 1a); their removal was followed by mild bleeding. In 10 ewes, purulent vaginal discharge was evident (Figure 1b). The lesions progressively resolved and, subsequently, all ewes lambed normally. After lambing, cases of orf were detected in the teats of 24 ewes of those previously affected, as well as around the lips and the nostrils of their lambs. No cases of the disease were recorded in the farm staff.


Phylogenetic analysis of strains of Orf virus isolated from two outbreaks of the disease in sheep in Greece.

Billinis C, Mavrogianni VS, Spyrou V, Fthenakis GC - Virol. J. (2012)

Representative lesions of genital form of orf in ewes. (a) Orf scabs scattered in the lower part of the vulva and the entrance of the vagina of a ewe. (b) Purulent vaginal discharge in a ewe with genital form of orf.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3275544&req=5

Figure 1: Representative lesions of genital form of orf in ewes. (a) Orf scabs scattered in the lower part of the vulva and the entrance of the vagina of a ewe. (b) Purulent vaginal discharge in a ewe with genital form of orf.
Mentions: The first outbreak occurred in 2003 and involved cases of genital form of orf. It was recorded in an intensive dairy flock with 115 Lacaune-breed ewes, in the region of Peloponnese in South Greece (coordinates: 37.06 °N, 21.63 °E). Animals in the flock were imported from France after the end of the breeding season. Cases were diagnosed 2 months after the end of the mating season, soon after establishment of the animals in the farm. Clinically, lesions characteristic of orf (papules, postules and scabs) were recorded in 78 ewes. Lesions were localised in the lower part of the vulva and the entrance of the vagina (Figure 1a); their removal was followed by mild bleeding. In 10 ewes, purulent vaginal discharge was evident (Figure 1b). The lesions progressively resolved and, subsequently, all ewes lambed normally. After lambing, cases of orf were detected in the teats of 24 ewes of those previously affected, as well as around the lips and the nostrils of their lambs. No cases of the disease were recorded in the farm staff.

Bottom Line: The homology of the nucleotide and amino-acid sequences between the two Greek isolates was 99.0% and 98.8%, respectively.We suggest that there can be differences between strains based on their geographical origin.However, differences in the origin of strains or in the clinical presentation of the disease may not be associated with their pathogenicity.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Faculty, University of Thessaly, Karditsa, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although orf is endemic around the world, there are few descriptions of Orf virus strains and comparisons of these strains. We report the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the partial B2L gene of Orf virus from two outbreaks of the disease in Greece. The first was an outbreak of genital form of the disease in a flock imported from France, whilst the second was an outbreak of the disease in the udder skin of ewes and around the mouth of lambs in an indigenous flock.

Results: Phylogenetic analysis was performed on a part (498 bp) of the B2L gene of 35 Parapoxvirus isolates, including the two Orf virus isolates recovered from each of the two outbreaks in the present study. This analysis revealed that the maximum nucleotide and amino-acid variation amongst Orf virus strains worldwide (n = 33) was 8.1% and 9.6%, respectively. The homology of the nucleotide and amino-acid sequences between the two Greek isolates was 99.0% and 98.8%, respectively. The two Greek isolates clustered only with Orf virus strains.

Conclusions: We suggest that there can be differences between strains based on their geographical origin. However, differences in the origin of strains or in the clinical presentation of the disease may not be associated with their pathogenicity. More work is required to determine if differing clinical presentations are linked to viral strain differences or if other factors, e.g., flock immunity, method of exposure or genetic susceptibility, are more important to determine the clinical presentation of the infection.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus