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Elevated fasting insulin predicts the future incidence of metabolic syndrome: a 5-year follow-up study.

Sung KC, Seo MH, Rhee EJ, Wilson AM - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2011)

Bottom Line: We identified 2, 350 Koreans subjects who did not have MS in 2003 and who were followed up in 2008.This predictive importance remained significant even after correcting for all the individual features of MS.These data suggest that high baseline fasting insulin levels are independent determinants for the future development of MS.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. kcmd.sung@samsung.com

ABSTRACT

Background: There is controversy about the specific pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome (MS) but several authors have argued that hyperinsulinemia is a key feature of the cluster. We aimed to assess whether the baseline insulin levels could predict the development of MS in a well characterised cohort of otherwise healthy adults who were followed over a five year period.

Methods: We identified 2, 350 Koreans subjects who did not have MS in 2003 and who were followed up in 2008. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the baseline quartiles of fasting insulin, and the predictors of the incidence of MS were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis.

Results: Over the follow up period, 8.5% of the cohort developed MS. However, 16.4% of the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels developed MS. In a model that included gender, age, the smoking status, the exercise level, alcohol consumption and the systolic blood pressure, the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels had more than a 5 times greater risk of developing MS compared that of the subjects in the lowest quartile. This predictive importance remained significant even after correcting for all the individual features of MS.

Conclusions: These data suggest that high baseline fasting insulin levels are independent determinants for the future development of MS.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Selection of study population.
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Figure 1: Selection of study population.

Mentions: The study population consisted of apparently healthy Koreans who had a comprehensive health examination in 2003 and they were re-examined 5 years later (2008) at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University. Initially 3, 153 individuals were identified. Among these participants, 803 were excluded. Individuals were excluded if they were on medication for T2DM (n = 58) or hypertension (n = 142) and/or if they had an elevated fasting plasma glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL (n = 382). Three hundred forty two participants were excluded for being diagnosed with MS at baseline. Individuals were also excluded for absence of data including fasting insulin level (n = 168). Thus, 2, 350 participants were eligible and included for the study (Figure 1).


Elevated fasting insulin predicts the future incidence of metabolic syndrome: a 5-year follow-up study.

Sung KC, Seo MH, Rhee EJ, Wilson AM - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2011)

Selection of study population.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3275515&req=5

Figure 1: Selection of study population.
Mentions: The study population consisted of apparently healthy Koreans who had a comprehensive health examination in 2003 and they were re-examined 5 years later (2008) at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University. Initially 3, 153 individuals were identified. Among these participants, 803 were excluded. Individuals were excluded if they were on medication for T2DM (n = 58) or hypertension (n = 142) and/or if they had an elevated fasting plasma glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL (n = 382). Three hundred forty two participants were excluded for being diagnosed with MS at baseline. Individuals were also excluded for absence of data including fasting insulin level (n = 168). Thus, 2, 350 participants were eligible and included for the study (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: We identified 2, 350 Koreans subjects who did not have MS in 2003 and who were followed up in 2008.This predictive importance remained significant even after correcting for all the individual features of MS.These data suggest that high baseline fasting insulin levels are independent determinants for the future development of MS.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. kcmd.sung@samsung.com

ABSTRACT

Background: There is controversy about the specific pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome (MS) but several authors have argued that hyperinsulinemia is a key feature of the cluster. We aimed to assess whether the baseline insulin levels could predict the development of MS in a well characterised cohort of otherwise healthy adults who were followed over a five year period.

Methods: We identified 2, 350 Koreans subjects who did not have MS in 2003 and who were followed up in 2008. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the baseline quartiles of fasting insulin, and the predictors of the incidence of MS were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis.

Results: Over the follow up period, 8.5% of the cohort developed MS. However, 16.4% of the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels developed MS. In a model that included gender, age, the smoking status, the exercise level, alcohol consumption and the systolic blood pressure, the subjects in the highest quartile of the insulin levels had more than a 5 times greater risk of developing MS compared that of the subjects in the lowest quartile. This predictive importance remained significant even after correcting for all the individual features of MS.

Conclusions: These data suggest that high baseline fasting insulin levels are independent determinants for the future development of MS.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus