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Stalin's mysterious death.

Faria MA - Surg Neurol Int (2011)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery (ret.) and Adjunct Professor of Medical History (ret.), Mercer University School of Medicine; President, www.haciendapub.com , Macon, Georgia, USA.

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You can go to bed too. ” But there was more to the story, and many years later after painstaking persistence, Radzinsky tracked down Peter Vasilievich Lozgachev, and the old guardsman, “still robust in spite of his age,” finally agreed to an interview about Stalin's final days... According to Lozgachev “only light wine was drunk, no cognac, no particularly strong drink to make him ill. ” Lozgachev's account differs from Tukov's in that according to Lozgachev, it was not Stalin who gave that unusual order but another guardsman, attachment Khrustalev, who had left the dacha at 10:00 a.m. on March 1... I shouldn’t need you today. ’” To Radzinsky, there was more here than meets the eye, and he clarifies the situation, “To be precise, [Lozgachev] heard it not from the Boss but from the attachment Khrustalev, who passed down the order, and left the dacha the next morning. ” Radzinsky included the following narrative as recounted by Lozgachev: “The next day was Sunday... At eight — nothing... We did not know what to do... We normally went in making some noise — sometimes even banged the door on purpose — to let him know we were coming... He did not like it if you came in quietly... Radzinsky hypothesized that Lavrenti Beria feared that Stalin intended to proceed not only with the conspiracy against the Jewish doctors, but also against some of the members of his inner circle, particularly Beria himself... They’ll just put us in the car and it's goodbye... But no, thank God, the doctors came to the conclusion that he’d had a hemorrhage... So away they went. ” Radzinsky asked him, “And what became of Khrustalev?” Lozgachev responded, “Khrustalev fell ill and died soon after… Orlov and Starostin were given jobs in Vladimir, and I stayed at ‘the facility’ — the facility was empty, with me as superintendent... On March 5, the sweating became profuse and the pulse undetectable... Stalin did not respond to oxygen or injections of camphor and adrenaline... While prudently citing hypertension as the culprit, the good doctors left behind enough traces of pathological evidence in their brief report to let posterity know they fulfilled their professional duties, as best they could, without compromising their careers or their lives with the new masters at the Kremlin... High blood pressure, per se, commonly results in hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and stroke but does not usually produce concomitant hematemesis (vomiting blood), as we see here in the clinical case of Stalin, and a further bleeding diathesis affecting the heart muscle, scantily as it is supported by the positive autopsy findings.

No MeSH data available.


Joseph Stalin's Body Lies in State
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Figure 4: Joseph Stalin's Body Lies in State

Mentions: Final Diagnosis: “Arising on March 5 in connection with the basic illness — hypertension and the disruption of circulation in the brain — a stomach hemorrhage facilitated the recurrent collapse, which ended in death.” [Figure 4]


Stalin's mysterious death.

Faria MA - Surg Neurol Int (2011)

Joseph Stalin's Body Lies in State
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3228382&req=5

Figure 4: Joseph Stalin's Body Lies in State
Mentions: Final Diagnosis: “Arising on March 5 in connection with the basic illness — hypertension and the disruption of circulation in the brain — a stomach hemorrhage facilitated the recurrent collapse, which ended in death.” [Figure 4]

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery (ret.) and Adjunct Professor of Medical History (ret.), Mercer University School of Medicine; President, www.haciendapub.com , Macon, Georgia, USA.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

You can go to bed too. ” But there was more to the story, and many years later after painstaking persistence, Radzinsky tracked down Peter Vasilievich Lozgachev, and the old guardsman, “still robust in spite of his age,” finally agreed to an interview about Stalin's final days... According to Lozgachev “only light wine was drunk, no cognac, no particularly strong drink to make him ill. ” Lozgachev's account differs from Tukov's in that according to Lozgachev, it was not Stalin who gave that unusual order but another guardsman, attachment Khrustalev, who had left the dacha at 10:00 a.m. on March 1... I shouldn’t need you today. ’” To Radzinsky, there was more here than meets the eye, and he clarifies the situation, “To be precise, [Lozgachev] heard it not from the Boss but from the attachment Khrustalev, who passed down the order, and left the dacha the next morning. ” Radzinsky included the following narrative as recounted by Lozgachev: “The next day was Sunday... At eight — nothing... We did not know what to do... We normally went in making some noise — sometimes even banged the door on purpose — to let him know we were coming... He did not like it if you came in quietly... Radzinsky hypothesized that Lavrenti Beria feared that Stalin intended to proceed not only with the conspiracy against the Jewish doctors, but also against some of the members of his inner circle, particularly Beria himself... They’ll just put us in the car and it's goodbye... But no, thank God, the doctors came to the conclusion that he’d had a hemorrhage... So away they went. ” Radzinsky asked him, “And what became of Khrustalev?” Lozgachev responded, “Khrustalev fell ill and died soon after… Orlov and Starostin were given jobs in Vladimir, and I stayed at ‘the facility’ — the facility was empty, with me as superintendent... On March 5, the sweating became profuse and the pulse undetectable... Stalin did not respond to oxygen or injections of camphor and adrenaline... While prudently citing hypertension as the culprit, the good doctors left behind enough traces of pathological evidence in their brief report to let posterity know they fulfilled their professional duties, as best they could, without compromising their careers or their lives with the new masters at the Kremlin... High blood pressure, per se, commonly results in hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and stroke but does not usually produce concomitant hematemesis (vomiting blood), as we see here in the clinical case of Stalin, and a further bleeding diathesis affecting the heart muscle, scantily as it is supported by the positive autopsy findings.

No MeSH data available.